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Step aside, Banksy and Van Gogh: An immersive Frida Kahlo exhibit is coming to Denver

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Step aside, Banksy and Van Gogh: An immersive Frida Kahlo exhibit is coming to Denver

A new exhibit featuring the work of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo is coming to Denver in 2022 and, in the spirit of recent art trends, it will be an “immersive” experience that engulfs visitors in animated projections that highlight the painter and many iconic pieces and portraits from her storied career.

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New Hampshire detectives pin cold case murder of Massachusetts woman on dead man

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New Hampshire detectives pin cold case murder of Massachusetts woman on dead man

Investigators have pinned the New Hampshire murder of a Haverhill woman that had remained unsolved for nearly 50 years on a man who died in 2019.

Arlene Clevesy was 48 years old when her nude body was spotted by a local fisherman near Hume Brook in Newton, N.H., on June 4, 1972, according to a N.H. Attorney General Office report. An autopsy found the cause of death to be “traumatic asphyxia, including drowning.”

Investigators re-opened the case in 2015 and announced Thursday they had determined Albert Francis Moore Jr. was the killer. In 1977, Moore was indicted by a grand jury on a second-degree murder charge in connection with Clevesy’s death. Prosecutors decided not to pursue the case in 1979 because Moore was serving a life sentence for the 1972 killing of Donald Rimer in Salem.

Moore, 88, died on Nov. 11, 2019, of metastatic prostate cancer, the N.H. Cold Case Unit said.

Harold Clevesy, Arlene’s husband, had told police they had gone out for drinks in Haverhill the night before. She had stayed out when he left for home. Witnesses later said that they had seen Arlene Clevesy leave in a truck with Moore.

The attorney general’s office said through the years, Moore “made a series of admissions … about his responsibility for Ms. Clevesy’s death,” including that he had “beaten” a polygraph exam when he was asked questions about her.

Moore also had admitted in other accounts during the 1970s that he had driven Clevesy to a wooded, secluded area, became violent with her, killed her and left her lying face-down in the water, the report said.

Herald wire services contributed to this report.

A 1972 artist sketch of the Arlene Clevesy homicide scene in Newton, N.H. (N.H. Attorney General’s Office)
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Jamaica Plain public housing development targeted for big investments this year

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Jamaica Plain public housing development targeted for big investments this year

A large Jamaica Plain public housing complex is in for a big year, as Mayor Michelle Wu is looking to put $50 million toward capital improvements to the Mildred C. Hailey apartments — which already are set as the site of a big project this year.

Wu swung by the 766-unit Hailey complex — named after a longtime housing activist who lived there — on Thursday to make the announcement alongside residents and other officials.

“These funds will go toward improving plumbing and ventilation, renovating windows, kitchens and bathrooms across 526 units of housing,” Wu said.

She added that the money, which requires the approval of the City Council to go forward, would come from a combination of federal recovery funds and the city’s capital budget.

“When we make an investment in public housing, we are making an investment in the working class people of the city,” new City Councilor Kendra Lara said.

The Mildred C. Hailey apartments were built in stages — one chunk in 1941, another 1952 and a third in 1964. People in the apartments — officials said about 50% of residents are seniors and 30% children — generally pay 30% of their income as rent.

“The only thing pulling the median income down from being stratospherically high is the public housing that we built in the 1940s,” said Kenzie Bok, a city councilor who formerly worked on policy for the Boston Housing Authority. “It is the only way that we are keeping low-income people in many of the neighborhoods of the city including JP.”

This is actually just one of two big changes coming to the Hailey apartments starting this year. The BHA is entering into a public-private partnership that would result in a developer knocking down and rebuilding 253 public housing units, and adding about 435 new “affordable and upper middle-income apartments,” according to the Boston Planning & Development Agency’s summary of the project.

The BHA is working with The Community Builders, the JP Community Development Corp. and Urban Edge — for the purposes of this project they’re all are coming together as Centre Street Partners — who all are developers that focus on affordable housing.

This overhaul didn’t come up much at the press conference, but construction is expected to start this fall. It’s the latest of various versions of this approach. The BHA has similar plans on deck at the Mary Ellen McCormack development in Southie and Bunker Hill in Charlestown.

“These renovations combined with the new housing plan with Centre Street Partners will really bring this site forward to serve generations of families,” Bennett said at the press conference.

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Lydia Edwards sworn in as state senator

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Lydia Edwards sworn in as state senator

State senators welcomed their newest member, former City Councilor Lydia Edwards of East Boston, into the chamber Thursday after she was elected in a special ballot where she was unopposed.

Edwards, the first Black woman to serve the First Suffolk and Middlesex district, was sworn in wearing suffragette white on Thursday afternoon.

In her inaugural speech, Edwards thanked her “four mothers” and spoke directly to her biological mother, Bridget Edwards.

“I hope you know the reason why I won was because of you. Your story — you’re more popular than I am, mom,” the senator said.

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