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Michigan teen charged in Oxford High School shooting

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Oxford High School shooting: Fourth student dies

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE

OXFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — A 15-year-old boy was charged Wednesday with murder, terrorism and other counts for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured others at Michigan’s Oxford High School.

Charges against Ethan Crumbley were announced Wednesday, a few hours after authorities reported the death of a fourth teen from the school in southeastern Michigan. Crumbley is charged as an adult with one count of terrorism causing death, four counts of first-degree murder and seven counts assault with intent to murder.

Prosecutor Karen McDonald did not reveal a possible motive for the shooting Tuesday at Oxford High School, located in a community of about 22,000 people roughly 30 miles (48 kilometers) north of Detroit. However, she said prosecutors are “confident” they can show the crime was premeditated.

“There is a mountain of digital evidence. Videotape, social media, all digital evidence possible,” she said.

Deputies rushed to the school around lunch time and arrested the suspect in a hallway within minutes. He put his hands in the air as deputies approached, Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said late Tuesday at a news conference.

The boy’s father on Friday bought the 9 mm Sig Sauer used in the shooting, Bouchard said. He did not know why the man bought the semi-automatic handgun, which his son had been posting pictures of and practicing shooting, Bouchard said.

The four students who were killed were identified as 16-year-old Tate Myre, 14-year-old Hana St. Juliana, 17-year-old Madisyn Baldwin and 17-year-old Justin Shilling, who died Wednesday.

Bouchard said Myre died in a patrol car as a deputy tried to get him to an emergency room.

A teacher who received a graze wound to the shoulder left the hospital, but seven students ranging in age from 14 to 17 remained hospitalized through the night with gunshot wounds, he said.

The gun the boy was carrying had seven more rounds of ammo in it when he surrendered, Bouchard said.

Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the student’s parents advised their son not to talk to investigators. Police must seek permission from a juvenile’s parents or guardian to speak with them, he added.

After the attack, authorities learned of social media posts about threats of a shooting at the roughly 1,700-student school. The sheriff stressed how crucial it is for such tips to be sent to authorities, while also cautioning against spreading social media rumors before a full investigation.

McCabe downplayed the significance of a situation in early November when a deer’s head was thrown off the school roof, which he said was “absolutely unrelated” to the shooting. The incident prompted school administrators to post two letters to parents on the school’s website, saying they were responding to rumors of a threat against the school but had found none.

Bouchard said the student in custody in the shooting had no previous run-ins with his department, and he was not aware of any disciplinary history at school.

“That’s part of our investigation to determine what happened prior to this event and if some signs were missed, how were they missed and why,” he said.

The district said in a statement that all schools would be closed for the rest of the week.

Isabel Flores, a 15-year-old ninth grader, told Detroit television station WJBK that she and other students heard gunshots and saw another student bleeding from the face. They then ran from the area through the rear of the school, she said.

A concerned parent, Robin Redding, said her son, 12th-grader Treshan Bryant, stayed home Tuesday after hearing threats of a possible shooting.

“This couldn’t be just random,” she said.

Bryant said he had heard vague threats “for a long time now” about plans for a shooting.

At a vigil Tuesday night at LakePoint Community Church, Leeann Dersa choked back tears as she hugged friends and neighbors. Dersa has lived nearly all of her 73 years in Oxford. Her grandchildren attended the high school.

“Scared us all something terrible. It’s awful,” Dersa said of the shooting.

Pastor Jesse Holt said news of the shooting flooded in to him and his wife, including texts from some of the 20 to 25 students who are among the 400-member congregation.

“Some were very scared, hiding under their desks and texting us, ‘We’re safe, we’re OK. We heard gunshots, but we’re OK.’ They were trying to calm us, at least that’s how it felt,” he said.

___

Associated Press journalists Ryan Kryska, Mike Householder and David Aguilar in Oxford Township, Michigan; Kathleen Foody in Chicago; and Josh Boak in Rosemount, Minnesota, contributed to this report.

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Mystery bump needs to be checked out

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Mystery bump needs to be checked out

Our dog is now almost 13. He has never really had any serious problems. He is about a 35-lb. mixed breed dog. We did not think much of his occasionally licking his left front paw for several weeks and he never exhibited any signs of lameness. Luckily, our daughter was home from college when she noticed that there was an olive-sized bump on the leg where his dewclaw had been.

We had our vet examine the dog and it was pointed out that the nail was missing for the most part but there was still something there that felt like a nail. Our vet thought that possibly the nail had been caught and torn off, so our dog was started on both antibiotics and anti-inflammatory oral medications. After two weeks, not much has changed. The swelling is about the same size and the dog seems oblivious to what is going on.

What should be done next? Our vet suggested the possibility of a tumor that might need to be removed but what kind could it be and what is the likelihood of malignancy? Since our dog is old, will there be much benefit to surgery given the fact that he seems to show no discomfort whatsoever?

There are several possibilities as to what might be going on. I am sure that, given the findings, your veterinarian had a reason for trying the medications that were given to your dog. Torn off dewclaws are not uncommon and can lead to localized swelling and discomfort. When acute, there is usually more pain and discomfort associated with the lesion and since your dog has not exhibited those signs, there might be something else going on.

Your comment that there was still some tissue that feels like a nail leaves me curious. My initial thought is that your dog may have a localized mass that is developing that can originate either in soft tissue or in the bones. Since not much has changed in two weeks, I would suggest doing two things starting with a radiograph and then doing a needle aspirate to see if whatever is there does histologically appear as neoplasia or not, benign or malignant, or anything else. Without needle aspirate or surgical biopsy, it is impossible to say what kind of tumor might be there.

Your veterinarian’s suggestion for surgical excision would follow these two initial steps and biopsy would likely be diagnostic. If there is a tumor, benign or malignant, surgical removal could be curative and be beneficial to your dog. Some tumors stay localized whereas others can metastasize and only following up on these steps will give you the answers that you seek. Hopefully, it is nothing serious and your dog will be fine.


Dr. John de Jong owns and operates the Boston Mobile Veterinary Clinic. He can be reached at 781-899-9994.

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Everyone’s a suspect in Apple TV+ comedy whodunit ‘The Afterparty’

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Everyone’s a suspect in Apple TV+ comedy whodunit ‘The Afterparty’

A murder at a high school reunion sets the stage for multiple suspects, perspectives and genres in a “Rashomon”-like whodunit comedy set to begin streaming on Apple TV+.

In “The Afterparty,” premiering Friday, the murder of class nerd-turned-music star Xavier (Dave Franco) at a party following their 15-year reunion makes suspects of a group of friends, each with a possible motive.

Among them are Zoe (Zoe Chao, “Love Life”), the former fun girl stuck in a dull administrator position at the same school; Brett (Ike Barinholtz, “The Mindy Project”), class bully and Zoe’s estranged husband; Aniq (Sam Richardson, “Veep”), a nice guy who carries a torch for Zoe; Yasper (Ben Schwartz, “Space Force”), Aniq’s best friend; and popular girl Chelsea (Ilana Glazer, “Broad City”).

Interviewing them is Detective Danner (Tiffany Haddish, “Girls Trip”), who takes statements from the suspects. So each episode is an account of the evening from the perspective of a given character. And the episodes have different genres, ranging from musical and Hitchcockian thriller to cop drama and comedy.

It was quite the exercise in storytelling for series creators Chris Miller and Phil Lord (“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” “The LEGO Movie”). But it was no walk in the park for the actors, either, as they had to juggle genres and keep track of where their character was at any point in each account.

Zoe Chao stars in “The Afterparty,” premiering Friday on Apple TV+.

Chao said with all the shifting around, “my brain would hurt by the time (we finished) every day but it felt like we were using everything we’ve got, which was fulfilling.”

“It really makes you have to revisit the tenets of acting,” she added, “like the moment before, the moment after. Like where are you in the story at any given moment? And you just had to hone in on the art. I mean, you do that with any project but we’re revisiting the same story from multiple angles and hitting similar beats but in different ways and in different genres. So it made you have to be really present and specific and intentional, which is great.”

The series was shot during the pandemic, so after the actors filmed scenes repetitively, they then went back to their quarters and into isolation. So the shooting days took on a surreal quality as one blended into the next.

“It did have this ‘Groundhog Day’ feeling,” Chao said, “because we were revisiting the same evening every single day in the same costume every single day for like five months while also returning home to COVID life, which was its own exercise in repetition and isolation. So it was kind of a trippy experience.”

— Zap2It

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HBO’s ‘Gilded Age’ spotlights upheaval in late-1800s New York

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HBO’s ‘Gilded Age’ spotlights upheaval in late-1800s New York

Old money clashes with new amid the changing economic order of late-1800s New York in a period drama from “Downton Abbey” creator Julian Fellowes that is upcoming on HBO.

In “The Gilded Age,” premiering Monday, it’s 1882 and there is a growing conflict between the old ways and the new. One side is represented by New York socialites Agnes van Rhijn and Ada Brook (Christine Baranski, “The Good Fight,” Cynthia Nixon, “And Just Like That …”), old money sisters who take young niece Marian Brook (Louisa Jacobson, “Gone Hollywood”) into their Fifth Avenue brownstone following the death of her father.

To their dismay, their new neighbors are George and Bertha Russell (Morgan Spector, “The Plot Against America,” Carrie Coon, “The Nest”), whom they regard as new money riffraff despite that he has made a fortune in railroads and she is a social climber and a capable woman in her own right.

Caught between these worlds is Marian, who must decide whether her future lies with the established order or in going her own way.

The nine-episode first season was filmed in late 2020 and early 2021 around New York City as well as in Newport, R.I., and Troy, N.Y. The turn-of-the-century architecture at these locations was a source of fascination for Spector, who embraced the chance to play someone from that era, albeit with some trepidation.

“You know, I’m married to a British actor,” Spector, the husband of Rebecca Hall (“Passing”), noted, “and when they start they do a lot of this type of drama, this sort of this era, the sort of high-style, high-language stuff. I’d done it in school but never really professionally so I was a little nervous about approaching it.

“But I think it’s sort of a testament to Julian’s abilities as a writer,” he said, “that you sort of slip into it quite easily, actually. But yeah, I really loved George. I love his combination of ruthlessness and deep love for his family and sweetness with his children. It gives you a lot to sort of oscillate between.”

Carrie Coon stars in “The Gilded Age,” premiering Monday on HBO.

Coon, meanwhile, loved that Bertha was her own woman with her own mind and thinks that had she existed in a later time, could conceivably be a senator or an entrepreneur.

“What I related to particularly with Bertha was an egalitarian marriage where her husband was not intimidated by her ambitions,” she said. “That’s certainly something I share with my husband (actor/playwright Tracy Letts, ”Divorce“) and so he’s my biggest champion. And I loved that Bertha and George have this passionate, equal, sexual relationship at the center of this story.

“I found that very relatable and very compelling — and very fresh and contemporary-feeling,” she added. “You know, not some stodgy period piece. These are people with the flesh-and-blood compulsions and I really appreciated that about them.”

— Zap2It

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