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Proposed bill would return control of St. Louis Police to state

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St. Louis City police to enforce curfew violations for juveniles

ST. LOUIS – A Missouri State representative has proposed a bill that would return the control of the City of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department back to the Board of Commissioners.

State Representative Nick Schroer pre-filed the bill on December 1 for the 2022 legislative session.

The bill says, “On or after July 1, 2023, the board of police commissioners shall assume control of any municipal police force established within any city not within a county…”

FOX2Now.com reached out to St. Louis Mayor Tishaura Jones’ office. A spokesperson said they do not comment on bills that have only been pre-filed.

State Rep. Schroer represents St. Charles County. Earlier this year, Schroer and other lawmakers took part in a press conference asking Gov. Mike Parson to call for a special session to discuss public safety and concerns over how police departments were being funded.

Schroer said that if the St. Louis City and its prosecutor do not get serious about arresting criminals and prosecuting cases he would push for the state to take back local control.

In 2013, St. Louis City gained local control of the police department. Missouri voters approved the plan.

Before local control, the chief of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department reported to the board of police commissioners. That board approves policies and purchases for the department. 

Until 2013, the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department had been under state control dating back to the civil war era.

The state of Missouri took over control of the St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri police departments in 1861.  This happened often in Border States at the start of the Civil War.  Supporters of the southern Confederate states were concerned the departments` vast arsenals and easy access to river traffic would be used by the northern Union army.  After the war, local control was returned to every other city in the country except St. Louis and Kansas City.

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Broncos interview Cincinnati assistant Brian Callahan two days before Bengals’ playoff game

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Broncos interview Cincinnati assistant Brian Callahan two days before Bengals’ playoff game

Two days ahead of his team’s first AFC Divisional round playoff game in 31 years, Cincinnati offensive coordinator Brian Callahan became the eighth head-coaching candidate to meet with Broncos officials.

Callahan was the first candidate to visit with Broncos general manager George Paton and Co., via video conference and the interview was completed around 4:45 p.m. The Broncos’ contingent flew from Philadelphia to Los Angeles earlier Thursday to interview Rams offensive coordinator Kevin O’Connell in-person later in the day.

Callahan, 37, was a Broncos assistant from 2010-15 and moved on to coach quarterbacks in Detroit (2016-17) and Oakland (2018) before coach Zac Taylor hired him as the Bengals’ offensive coordinator in ’19.

Callahan doesn’t call the plays but has merited head-coaching consideration as the Bengals have improved from two to four to 10 wins over three years and from 29th to 13th in scoring this year.

The Bengals play at Tennessee on Saturday and Callahan told reporters this week it has been “really easy” to keep his attention toward the game.

“My focus is 100% on this game and to our players; there is no other focus for me,” he said. “Anything I do outside of that framework, it’s on my own time late at night (or) early in the morning. These (interviews) are things you slowly prepare for over time and you get a chance to collect your thoughts.

“All of these things are personal accolades and it’s because the team has had success and you get individual benefit from the collective success and that’s certainly where I’m at right now. It’s an honor to be involved in a process like (the Broncos’).”

Callahan is the son of Bill Callahan, previously the head coach of the Raiders and Nebraska and currently the Cleveland Browns’ offensive line coach.

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CU Athletics launches Buffs NIL Exchange

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CU Athletics launches Buffs NIL Exchange

Colorado Athletics announced Thursday a partnership with INFLCR to launch the Buffs NIL Exchange.

The Exchange is a platform for businesses and individuals to connect with CU student-athletes on Name, Image and Likeness (NIL) opportunities. The Buffs NIL Exchange is a part of CU’s Buffs With A Brand program in helping student-athletes profit from their NIL.

“I’m thrilled we can offer the Buffs NIL Exchange as our NIL platform for all Buff supporters and current student-athletes,” CU athletic director Rick George said in a press release. “This platform will tremendously increase the NIL opportunities for our student-athletes while supporting local and national businesses.  We are excited for our student-athletes to capitalize in this new landscape and look forward to having our supporters and businesses utilize this platform.”

BOULDER, CO – FEBRUARY 12, 2020: University of Colorado athletic director Rick George addresses the media after Mel Tucker announces he is leaving.(Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)

Through the Buffs NIL Exchange, individuals and businesses can register through an online portal to partner directly with CU athletes. The brand-focused partnership must meet legal requirements, per Colorado legislature, and follow University of Colorado NIL protocols. Registration will be approved by CU Athletics in advance.

Following registration in the online portal, NIL negotiations will be done directly between the student-athletes and the outside parties. The Buffs NIL Exchange is free for student-athletes and businesses.

INFLCR is one of the national leaders in athlete brand building. According to CU’s press release, through INFLCR, student-athletes will have access to third parties who provide NIL opportunities such as autographs, social media brand promotion, endorsements and more.

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Post-COVID ‘brain fog’ could be result of virus changing patients’ spinal fluid

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Post-COVID ‘brain fog’ could be result of virus changing patients’ spinal fluid

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (StudyFinds.org) – Cases of “brain fog” among COVID patients are becoming more and more common, even among people recovering from mild infections. Now, new research is finally providing some potential answers to why people have difficulty concentrating, thinking clearly, and completing easy daily tasks after battling COVID. A team from the University of California-San Francisco say brain fog may result from how the virus alters a person’s spinal fluid — just like other diseases which attack the brain.

Their study finds certain patients who develop cognitive symptoms following a mild case of COVID-19 display abnormalities in their cerebrospinal fluid, similar to the kinds which appear in patients with diseases like Alzheimer’s. While this is only a start, study authors are optimistic this work is an important first step toward understanding what exactly SARS-CoV-2 can do to the human brain.

“They manifest as problems remembering recent events, coming up with names or words, staying focused, and issues with holding onto and manipulating information, as well as slowed processing speed,” explains senior study author Joanna Hellmuth, MD, MHS, of the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, in a university release.

Post-COVID brain fog is likely much more common than most people realize. One recently released study focusing on a post-COVID clinic in New York found that a staggering 67 percent of 156 recovered COVID-19 patients experienced some form of brain fog.

Brain fog patients experience more brain inflammation

This latest research featured 32 adults. All participants had recovered from a COVID-19 infection but did not require hospitalization. Twenty-two exhibited genuine cognitive symptoms, while the rest served as a healthy control group.

Among the entire group, 17 (including 13 with brain fog symptoms) agreed to have their cerebrospinal fluid analyzed. Scientists extracted the fluids from the lower back, on average, about 10 months after each patient’s first COVID symptoms.

Those tests showed 10 of the 13 participants with cognitive symptoms had anomalies within their cerebrospinal fluid. Importantly, the other four cerebrospinal fluid samples collected from people without brain fog showed no anomalies whatsoever. Participants experiencing cognitive issues tended to be older, with an average age of 48, while the control group’s average age was younger: 39 years-old.

All of the patients come from the Long-term Impact of Infection with Novel Coronavirus (LIINC) study, which tracks and assesses adults recovering from SARS-CoV-2.

Further analyses performed on the cerebrospinal fluid samples showed higher-than-normal protein levels and the presence of some unexpected antibodies usually found in an activated immune system. Researchers say these observations suggest a high level of inflammation. Some of these antibodies were seen in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid, implying a systemic inflammatory response. Some antibodies, however, were unique to the cerebrospinal fluid, which hints at brain inflammation specifically.

Study authors don’t know the intended target of these antibodies yet, but theorize they may attack the body itself, like an autoimmune disease.

“It’s possible that the immune system, stimulated by the virus, may be functioning in an unintended pathological way,” explains Dr. Hellmuth, who is the principal investigator of the UCSF Coronavirus Neurocognitive Study. “This would be the case even though the individuals did not have the virus in their bodies.”

Pre-existing conditions raise the risk of COVID brain fog

Notably, patients dealing with brain fog symptoms had an average of 2.5 cognitive risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or a history of ADHD, in comparison to an average of less than one average risk factor for participants without brain fog symptoms.

These cognitive risk factors are relevant because they potentially raise an individual’s risk of stroke, mild cognitive impairment, vascular dementia, and generally make the mind more susceptible to executive functioning issues. Additional risk factors include drug use, learning disabilities, anxiety, and depression.

Additionally, all participants underwent a series of cognitive tests with a neuropsychologist modeled after the criteria used for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). To the research team’s surprise, 59 percent of patients dealing with brain fog met HAND criteria, while 70 percent of the control subjects did the same.

“Comparing cognitive performance to normative references may not identify true changes, particularly in those with a high pre-COVID baseline, who may have experienced a notable drop but still fall within normal limits,” Dr. Hellmuth concludes. “If people tell us they have new thinking and memory issues, I think we should believe them rather than require that they meet certain severity criteria.”

The study is published in the journal Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology.

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