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‘The View’: Joy Behar Calls Out Dr. Oz For COVID Stance — He’s On ‘The Dark Side’

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Dr. Oz, Joy Behar

The ladies of ‘The View’ criticized the TV doctor for comments he made during an interview with Sean Hannity, ahead of his campaign for the Senate.

It’s no secret that the co-hosts of The View are strongly in favor of people taking serious precautions when it comes to COVID-19. The women called out Dr. Oz during a hot topics discussion on Wednesday December 1, after the medical TV personality gave an interview to Fox’s Sean Hannity, where he criticized lockdowns. The women pointed out the Senate hopeful’s past controversial statements about reopening schools amid the pandemic.

In the clip from the Hannity interview, Dr. Oz, who’s running for senator in Pennsylvania, he spoke out against shutdowns amid the pandemic. “Remember the phrase ‘two weeks to flatten the curve?’ That metastasized into this incredible authoritarianism overreaching that did not necessarily make us safer. Remember they closed the parks, they shamed people about beaches. Now they’re threatening the same overreach with the omicron that you were just talking about. I think those choices should be yours—the American people’s,” the 61-year-old TV personality said.

Dr. Oz is running for Senator of Pennsylvania. (MediaPunch/Shutterstock)

After the clip ended, Joy Behar, 79, seemed shocked. “What happened to him? He’s gone over to the dark side,” she said. Sunny Hostin, 53, brought up Dr. Oz’s past comments about opening schools during the pandemic and mentioned that the mortality rate could be 2 to 3 percent. “Any, you know, any life is a life lost, but to get every child back into a school where they’re being educated and fed and making the most of their lives, with the theoretical risk of the backside — that might be a tradeoff some folks would consider,” Dr. Oz said during an April 2020 interview with Hannity. After the backlash, he apologized and said he “misspoke.” Sunny brought up the comments to show she was against his campaign and COVID stance. “You’re willing to sacrifice the lives of our children? Was he willing to sacrifice the lives of his children and his grandchildren?” she said.

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Joy called out Dr. Oz for an interview he gave with Sean Hannity. (MediaPunch/Shutterstock)

Joy noted that while she was in shock over his stance, she did have a personal relationship with him, but mentioned that she felt like his politics were out of hand. “He’s very personally a doll. This is some political aspiration that he has that must be controlled,” she said, while Whoopi Goldberg, 66, mentioned that regardless of their relationship, she was against his campaign. “Kids going back to school deserve to be safe, and if you as a doctor and physician can’t see that, then you’re not somebody I want to vote for. No matter how much I like you,” she said.

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The case for an inquiry into Canada’s treatment of First Nations children

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People contribute to a hand painting during the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa on Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Cindy Blackstock: ‘Canada continues to treat First Nations people as if they are not worth the money by providing deficient public services on reserves and choosing to not implement solutions’

Cindy Blackstock, a member of the Gitxsan First Nation, is the executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and a professor at McGill University.

I really don’t like inquiries. They often amount to a lot of political show and not much action. But today I am making an exception—mostly out of profound desperation. We need a public inquiry into the departments of Justice and Indigenous Services Canada to stop their repeated abuses against First Nations children. In the wake of residential schools and tearful apologies from federal politicians and officials, Canada continues to treat First Nations people as if they are not worth the money by providing deficient public services on reserves and choosing to not implement solutions. The ongoing choices made by these two departments—and collateral departments, to ignore solutions to properly fix its inequitable First Nations public services and other injustices is literally costing the Canadian public tens of billions of dollars and costing First Nations children their childhoods and, in some cases, their lives.

Just earlier this month, three First Nations children died in a house fire at Sandy Lake First Nation. Community officials connect the deaths to woefully insufficient fire and emergency services, saying that “a lack of adequate water lines and infrastructure prevented the use of fire hydrants” to put out the fire. The lack of adequate resources and infrastructure on First Nations reserves is not news to Canada; the federal government has known about this problem for years and chose not to fix it. When stories of the injustices hit the media, Canada does sometimes act, but often in just a perfunctory way to defuse public pressure. Consider a recent Department of Justice’s news conference announcing $332,270 to support the families of over 4,000 murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls. That is about 83 cents per victim.

RELATED: Cindy Blackstock: A relentless champion for Indigenous children’s rights

The cost of this chronic negligence came into stark relief this past month when the government finally admitted that its ongoing discrimination towards First Nations children required $40 billion to compensate victims and fix inequalities in federally funded First Nations child welfare services. This federal announcement was not voluntary. It came after 15 years of litigation by the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society and the Assembly of First Nations, over 30 government losses in Canadian courts and significant public pressure. All of this was necessary to fix a problem that would have only cost hundreds of millions to fix back in 2000 when the federal government agreed its under-funding of First Nations child welfare was driving more First Nations children into child welfare than during residential schools. Instead of fixing the problem then, even though it had a surplus budget, the government chose to kick the problem downstream, and now the receipts have come due, and Canada has to pay. But First Nations children have already paid with their childhoods.

Half of the $40 billion will compensate First Nations children and families victimized by Canada’s apartheid public services; many of them are still children. Nearly 60,000 First Nations children (that is more than the populations of New Westminster, B.C., or Fredericton, N.B.) were removed from their homes since 2006 because Canada’s deficient public services denied families the chance to recover from the multi-generational harms of residential schools. Other children were denied public services because they were First Nations. Undisputed evidence shows that the government denied a four-year-old girl in palliative care respiratory equipment, capped the number of catheters and feeding tubes, and denied basic educational and respite supports for special needs children.

Even after Canada was ordered to cease its discriminatory conduct in 2016, it continued its wrongdoing. Over 20 non-compliance and procedural orders were required to get to the $40-billion announcement. During this time, First Nations children continued to go into foster care at record rates because service providers did not have the funding needed to keep families together, and at least three children died because Ottawa defied legal orders and failed to provide mental health supports.

This whole matter of the government’s choice to not do better for First Nations children when it knows better needs to be “ventilated” in a public inquiry. That is what Peter Henderson Bryce, Canada’s health inspector for the Indian Department, called for in his 1922 booklet called A National Crime. It was part of his repeated attempts to save the lives of “Indian” children in residential schools who were dying at a rate of 25 per cent per year from tuberculosis fuelled by Ottawa’s unequal health care funding for “Indians” and terrible health practices in the institutions, which he first reported on in 1907. Canadian media covering the story in 1907 characterized the government’s behaviour as “Absolute Inattention to the Bare Necessities of Health” and reported that “Indians are dying like flies.” In 1908, lawyer Samuel Hume Blake famously noted that, “[i]n doing nothing to obviate the preventable causes of death,” the Indian Department brings itself “within unpleasant nearness to the charge of manslaughter.”

When the images of the unmarked graves ignited a public outcry this past summer, I found myself wondering: how many of those children would have been saved had Canada listened to the people of that period? And how many children could be saved if Canada stopped fighting First Nations children in court and complied with the legal orders to stop its discriminatory conduct now?

Political claims that Canada has “done more than any other government,” is “making good first steps and is committed to reconciliation” are an affront to the suffering of First Nations children and families who continue to be treated as if they are not worth the money.

Once implemented, the $40 billion in support will help families, but it will not end all the inequalities in public services on reserves. To ensure Canada ends its repeated offences against First Nations children, we need a public inquiry into Canada’s continued failure to provide equitable infrastructure and services, and we need a public and comprehensive plan to fix the discrimination across the board. As Sandy Lake First Nations Chief Delores Kakegamic asserted after the tragedy in her community earlier this month: “We should have the same level of support as anyone else in Canada. Lives are at stake.”

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Drax Project Wants You To Have Some Fun While Going ‘Crazy’ With Their New Song

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Drax Project Wants You To Have Some Fun While Going ‘Crazy’ With Their New Song

After two year of madness and sadness, New Zealand’s Drax Project has dropped the next big party anthem, one that will make you go ‘Crazy’ out on the dance floor.

The new version of “the Roarin’ 20s” got off on the wrong foot, to say the least. Murder hornets. Pandemic lockdowns. The death of Betty White. It definitely feels like we’re in the darkest timeline, but Drax Project would rather make you feel like grooving, like cutting loose and getting wild. Maybe, go a little….crazy? With “Crazy,” the group — Shaan Singh (lead vocals, sax, keys), Matt Beachen (drums), Sam Thomson (bass, keys, vocals) and Ben O’Leary (Guitar, keys, vocals) – delivers audio serotonin with a neon-powered dance-pop banger, infused with R&B and soul that should put the pep back into your step.

With this new single, Drax Project is looking for a kiss – as in, “keep it simple,” silly. “It’s been a pretty tough last couple of years for everyone,” the band shares with HollywoodLife, “so with ‘Crazy’ we just wanted to make a song that was pure fun – no deeper meanings, just something that hopefully makes people forget their troubles and feel good in the moment.”

Drax Project has been making the world feel good for nearly a decade now. First starting off as a busker group on the streets of Wellington (New Zealand’s capital, in case you didn’t know), Drax Project released their first EP in 2014 on Bandcamp. From there, people began picking up what the group was laying down. Lorde had them open for her Auckland concert in 2017. Camila Cabello enlisted them to open the European leg of her 2018 Never Be The Same tour, after they opened for Ed Sheeran on three performances of his Division tour. In 2019, the group released their first studio album on Universal, and since then, it’s been certified double-platinum.

1642796482 735 Drax Project Wants You To Have Some Fun While Going

1642796482 455 Drax Project Wants You To Have Some Fun While Going

“Crazy” sees Drax Project work with Grey — who teamed with Zedd and Maren Morris for “The Middle” – and Grammy-award-winning mixer Tom Norris. “We were road tripping around America when ‘The Middle’ blew up,” the band tells HollywoodLife. “Every time it came on the radio we’d be like ‘turn it up,’ ‘damn this sounds good,’ and so on. So when the call came to work with Grey and Tom Norris we obviously jumped at it.”

While the pandemic isn’t over, it seems that things are adjusting to a place where live music can go on. This means that Drax Project will one day soon be road trippin’ across the U.S. again. “We’ve been super lucky to be in New Zealand during the pandemic,” says the group, “but we are missing America. In the 2 years before COVID, LA had become like a second home. It’s been really sad watching what our friends in the US have gone through, but hopefully, 2022 is the year where things turn around. We can’t wait to come back!” And when they do, get ready to go crazy at their shows!

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First Look At Madea & Her Good Wig In ‘Tyler Perry’s A Madea Homecoming’ Premiering On Netflix Next Month

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First Look At Madea & Her Good Wig In ‘Tyler Perry’s A Madea Homecoming’ Premiering On Netflix Next Month

Hellurrrr, it’s Madea again

Source: Netflix

Our fave gun-toting auntie is BACK for more hilarious shenanigans in “Tyler Perry’s A Madea Homecoming” that centers around Madea’s great-grandson’s college graduation where hidden secrets and family drama threaten to ruin the celebration.

Tyler Perry's A Madea Homecoming assets

Source: Netflix

The Netflix film features fan faves from across the Madeaverse including Tamela Mann (Cora), David Mann (Mr. Brown), Cassi Davis Patton (Aunt Bam) and a guest appearance from iconic Irish actor Brendan O’Carroll best known for portraying Madea-esque character Agnes Brown on stage and in the BBC sitcom ‘Mrs. Brown’s Boys.’

Tyler Perry's A Madea Homecoming assets

Source: Netflix

“I was looking at the state of the world and how polarized it is… nobody’s laughing,” said Perry in an exclusive interview with EW. “Nobody’s getting the chance to belly-laugh anymore. And I’m like, ‘What tool do I have in my arsenal that can bring that kind of laughter?’”

You may recall Perry retiring Madea as he premiered “A Madea Family Funeral” in 2019 but we had a feeling he’d un-retire the beloved character who launched him into mainstream stardom.

“I’ll be 50 this year and I’m just at a place in my life where this next 50 I want to do things differently,” he told CNN while promoting the film. “This character has been amazing. So many people have loved her. It’s been a great franchise.”

Naturally, Perry left the door open for his return as Madea that’s now a reality.

“She’s also run out of things to say in my point of view… so if there’s something else for her to say maybe one day she’ll return but for right now, no, I think I’m done.”

And based on his recent Instagram posts, he’s having wayyy too much fun promoting the upcoming film.

“A Madea Homecoming” premieres exclusively on Netflix on Feb. 25.

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