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Broncos Journal: Twenty-two years after first meeting, Vic Fangio and Andy Reid match wits again

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Broncos Journal: Twenty-two years after first meeting, Vic Fangio and Andy Reid match wits again

Ten things about the Broncos entering Sunday night’s game at Kansas City:

1. Despite their significant play-calling experience, teams with Broncos coach Vic Fangio (18th year as a play-caller) and Chiefs coach Andy Reid (23rd year) have met only nine times. Reid (Kansas City and Philadelphia) has a 5-4 edge with averages of 25.2 points and 343.4 yards against Fangio (Indianapolis, Houston, San Francisco, Chicago and the Broncos). Fangio’s defenses have forced 14 turnovers.

2. The first Fangio-Reid game was in 1999 when Fangio was with Indianapolis and Reid was the Eagles’ first-year coach. The Colts won 44-17, holding Philadelphia to 212 yards and forcing five turnovers. In 2011, Fangio’s 49ers won 24-23 despite allowing 513 yards (they forced three takeaways). Reid has won all four games against the Fangio-coached Broncos.

3. Reid on Fangio: “He does a great job every year. His mind is special when it comes to the defensive side of the football. They have an influx of young players and new players and they’re playing their tails off. You put the tape on and they’re playing hard and they’re very sound at what they do.”

4. Fangio on Reid: “It’s a difficult offense to defend by the design of it. It’s a spread-out offense. The guys running the offense are really, really fast. You have those ingredients and then put (Patrick) Mahomes in there. They run a similar offense that they ran when Alex Smith was there. Mahomes is Mahomes. That makes it a lot better.”

5. Do the Chiefs just run more stuff offensively? Yes. “There is a variety of things,” defensive backs coach Christian Parker said. “You talk about formations, the actual concepts, where guys line up; a lot of teams, you can dial in and say, ‘This guy does this, that guy does that.’ You can’t dial in with these guys. They do a good job breaking their tendencies each and every week so you have to know yourself, know your rules and go play ball.”

6. Even though he’s eligible to return from injured reserve, Broncos cornerback Bryce Callahan (knee) never got out of the blocks and will miss a fourth consecutive game. Kyle Fuller will get the call as the nickel back and he’s had his moments playing in tight quarters, but the Chargers completed eight of nine passes in man coverage against him last week.

7. Parker on Fuller making the adjustment to a nickel role: “Even when he wasn’t playing, he was practicing hard and he was running extra gassers on the sideline during the special teams periods to stay in shape because he’s been in this game long enough, he knows he can be called on in a moment’s notice and it happened when we played the Raiders (in Week 6). Pat (Surtain II) got banged up and you didn’t even need to look for Kyle to go in — he was on the field, they targeted him and he made a stop on third down.”

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Boston College’s $100M Pine Manor Institute for Student Success to offer free courses

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Boston College’s $100M Pine Manor Institute for Student Success to offer free courses

Boston College will introduce a free summer enrichment program in June for middle and high schoolers, and an associate’s-degree-granting two-year residential college in 2024, both to broaden opportunities for underrepresented, first-generation students, the university said Thursday.

Both initiatives are part of the university’s $100 million Pine Manor Institute for Student Success, established in 2020 when Boston College and Pine Manor College signed an integration agreement that included a $50 million commitment from Boston College, which has grown to $100 million through investment returns and an anonymous pledge of $25 million.

Through the Pine Minor Institute for Students Success, the residential summer enrichment program for middle and high school students, called the Academy, will be hosted on the BC campus.

“Boston College realizes there are students who need a college degree or an opportunity to do better in middle or high school,” said University President William P. Leahy. “The goal is to match need with opportunity … so that their world’s been widened, their horizon’s been broadened.”

Beginning with a group of 40 middle school students, the Academy will offer summer courses in English, math and science for students nominated by principals, teachers, counselors or religious and community leaders.

During the school year, the students will receive academic support from trained BC success coaches and mentoring from BC undergraduate and graduate students to help the Academy students navigate the journey from middle school to college.

As they advance through high school, students also will receive training in public speaking, time management, SAT/ACT prep, and the college application process. In the summer before their senior year, they will take a college-credit course to help enhance their college readiness.

The two-year college division of Boston College will be called Messina College, named after the first Jesuit school founded in Sicily in 1548. It will offer an associate’s degree program for 100 students annually, beginning in the 2024-25 school year, with the goal of preparing students for continued studies in a bachelor’s degree program or for a professional career.

Messina College will be located on the former Pine Manor College campus in Brookline, and its students will have full access to Boston College’s campus programs and facilities. Successful students will be eligible to apply to transfer to Boston College to complete a bachelor’s degree.

The final component of the Pine Manor Institute will be an ongoing outreach initiative that will provide support for graduates of the Academy and Messina College throughout the completion of their academic studies and into their professional careers.

Together, these offerings aim to expand upon Boston College’s success in educating under-resourced, first-generation students, while continuing Pine Manor College’s legacy of outreach to underserved communities.

 

 

 

 

 

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Netflix stock plunges as subscriber growth worries deepen

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Netflix stock plunges as subscriber growth worries deepen

Netflix delivered its latest quarter of disappointing subscriber growth during the final three months of last year, a trend that management foresees continuing into the new year as tougher competition is undercutting the video streaming leader.

The Los Gatos, Calif., company added 8.3 million worldwide subscribers during the October-December period, about 200,000 fewer than management had forecast. Besides releasing its fourth-quarter results Thursday, Netflix also projected an increase of 2.5 million subscribers during the first three months of this year, well below analysts’ expectations for a gain of 4 million, according to FactSet Research.

The disappointing news caused Netflix’s stock price to plunge by about 20% in extended trading after the numbers came out, deepening a steep decline during the past two months.

It capped a challenging year for Netflix after it reveled in eye-popping gains during the pandemic lockdowns of 2020 that drove homebound people to its service.

Netflix picked up 18.2 million worldwide subscribers during 2021, its slowest pace of annual growth in five years. It came after Netflix gained more than 36 million subscribers during 2020. The service now boasts nearly 222 million worldwide subscribers worldwide, more than any other video streaming leader.

But other services backed by deep-pocketed rivals such as Walt Disney Co. and Apple have been making inroads in recent years, and a bevy of other networks also are wading into video streaming in an attempt to grab eyeballs and a piece of household budgets. The escalating competition is one reason Netflix decided to expand into video games last year.

“The 2022 backdrop for Netflix seems to have been set with a theme of competition abound,” said Third Bridge analyst Joe McCormack.

While acknowledging the competition is having a “marginal” effects on its growth in its quarterly shareholder letter, Netflix emphasized its service is still thriving in every country where it’s available.

In a Thursday conference call, Netflix executives also said uncertainty caused by the ebb and flow of the pandemic during the past year has made it more difficult to gauge future growth.

COVID “has created a lot of bumpiness,” co-CEO Ted Sarandos said. The company’s other co-CEO, Reed Hastings, also expressed some frustration before adding, “For now, we’re just like staying calm and trying to figure (it) out.”

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Full schedule of concerts planned for Tanglewood this summer

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Full schedule of concerts planned for Tanglewood this summer

The Boston Symphony Orchestra announced Thursday that its summer home in Tanglewood will host a full schedule of concerts this year for the first time since 2019.

The 2022 season that runs from June 17 through Sept. 4 will include a 90th birthday celebration for John Williams with conductor Ken-David Masur leading the orchestra and featuring guest artists including Yo-Yo Ma and Branford Marsalis; a Boston Pops tribute to Stephen Sondheim; James Taylor’s traditional July Fourth show; and the popular artists series that includes Ringo Starr and his All-Starr Band, Brandi Carlile, Judy Collins and Earth, Wind & Fire.

The lineup includes eight world and American premieres and 28 works by living composers, as well as 21 artists in their Tanglewood or BSO debuts.

Boston Symphony Orchestra Music Director Andris Nelsons will lead nine programs, including the July 8-10 Opening Night program of Bernstein’s Symphony No. 2 with piano soloist Jean-Yves Thibaudet and Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring.”

“The 2022 Tanglewood season is filled with so many wonderful styles of composition, performed by the most extraordinary musicians working today, among them our very own Boston Symphony Orchestra,” Nelsons said in a statement.

Tanglewood, located in the towns of Lenox and Stockbridge in the Berkshire hills of western Massachusetts, has been the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra since 1937.

The 2020 season was canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic, and last year’s schedule was shortened.

Ozawa Hall and the Linde Center for Music and Learning, which were both closed in 2020 and 2021, will reopen this year for smaller audiences to take in recitals, chamber music and guest ensemble performances.

Given the ongoing pandemic, the BSO said it would announce updated health and safety measures closer to start of the summer season.

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