Connect with us

News

Major Case Squad investigates after St. Louis Metro bus driver shot, crashes into utility pole

Published

on

Major Case Squad investigates after St. Louis Metro bus driver shot, crashes into utility pole

ST. LOUIS – The Major Case Squad of Greater St. Louis is now investigating a shooting of a Metro bus driver who was shot while driving the bus, causing the bus to crash into a utility pole.

The driver is in the hospital in critical condition.

Police say this happened after 7 P.M. Friday night at the 3400 block of Lucas and Hunt Road. There were several passengers on the bus but no one was injured from the gunshot. Passengers reported it was a single gunshot from outside the bus that struck the driver while the bus was moving. 

Mayor of Beverly Hills Brian Jackson said it’s unfortunate that this happened in the quiet city.

“Just want the family to know on behalf of the City of Beverly Hills, the Mayor and the board, we send our prayers. Our heart goes out to the family, and pray that all the best comes out of this,” he said

The driver suffered a gunshot wound to the upper body and was transported to a local hospital.

A statement from President & CEO of Bi-State Development Taulby Roach said in part: “We are grieving this unexplainable event and ask the region to pray for the operator and their family. We also ask the public to recognize our heroic workforce who are understandably shaken by this event. Metro operators are true public servants and their bravery in the face of the ills of our region is courageous. They deserve much better than this.”

Police are asking anyone with information who wishes to remain anonymous to call 866-731-TIPS.

“We have a very quiet city. If you look around, we have some of the lowest crimes of any other municipality. And I’ve been living here almost 32 years and it’s always been a quiet city,” Mayor Jackon said.

Anyone with information can call CrimeStoppers at 866-371-TIPS and be eligible for a cash reward of up to $5,000.

google news

News

Editorial: A burning question for gov candidate Healey

Published

on

Editorial: A burning question for gov candidate Healey

After one of the longest drumrolls in history, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey has finally taken the stage and announced her candidacy for governor.

We’d hate to think she put on those waders for nothing.

Healey spent the last year on many photogenic outings, from touring the non-profit Food for Free site in Cambridge in March, to making some impressive moves in a game of kickball during the All Dorchester Sports and Leadership event in July, and finally, a visit to Plymouth’s Piney Wood cranberry bog in November, all while coyly deflecting questions about her running status.

Finally, on Thursday, Healey made it official — she’s in it to win it.

And already the 50-year-old Democrat is the front-runner, buoyed by name recognition across the state after two terms as AG, and an impressive war chest. As the Herald reported, Healey’s got more than $3.6 million salted away.

All she needs now is for Massachusetts voters to develop amnesia.

“We need a leader who sees everyone, who listens, and holds fast to their values. That’s the kind of campaign we’re going to run, and it’s the kind of governor I will be,” Healey said Thursday.

That’s not quite in line with her views from June 2020, when amid the riots following the killing of George Floyd by police officers in Minnesota, as cities were aflame. and  businesses vandalized and looted — including in Boston — Healey addressed the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce via Zoom and said, “Yes, America is burning. But that’s how forests grow.”

Listening to and seeing everyone would seemingly include those whose livelihoods could be destroyed in a riot, or the police officers injured trying to maintain order on the streets. But the looted and vandalized were merely collateral damage in a progressive backdraft. What good is holding fast to your values if your own leaders don’t respect you for it?

The question for Healey, and indeed for all the Democratic contenders for governor — state Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz and Harvard professor Danielle Allen — is will the race for the corner office be a battle to out-liberal each other?

All three are progressive Democrats, which, in a state as blue as Massachusetts, will find plenty of fans. But for Independents especially, a group that keeps expanding, agenda matters less than substance.

And as the country grows more dissatisfied with the president and Congressional Democrats look to the midterms with a sense of dread, riding a blue wave isn’t the guarantee it was two years ago.

The embers haven’t gone out from that burning forest statement — it’s up to Healey to convince us that she’s truly in the game to represent everyone.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Kimbler: No end in sight for L.A. train cargo thefts

Published

on

Kimbler: No end in sight for L.A. train cargo thefts

The shocking images of railroad tracks scattered with torn cardboard and slashed shipping containers left behind by freight rail thieves are likely to continue, experts say, thanks to an increase in criminal usage of new technology and a decline in enforcement.

Over the past year, Union Pacific has seen a 160% increase in thefts of freight rail containers at the Port of Los Angeles. In a letter from its Public Affairs Director Adrian Guerrero to Los Angeles District Attorney George Gascon, the company reports that, on average, 90 containers are compromised every day. And those thefts have been accompanied by an increase in assaults and even armed robberies of Union Pacific employees.

“Organized retail crime is one of the fastest-growing criminal enterprises in the world due to the dramatic growth of business-to-consumer online sales, which rose from $4.2 trillion in 2019 to $5.3 trillion in 2020 due to COVID-19,” said Matt Albence, spokesman for United to Safeguard Illegal Trade (USA-IT). Albance’s organization is a private-public partnership created to fight against the sale of stolen and counterfeit goods.

“The looting of packages from trains like those seen in Los Angeles County are tied to the same criminal networks connected to the ‘smash and grabs’ happening across the country — and for good reason: It is a low-risk, high-reward crime. Instead of drugs and guns, transnational criminal organizations — including drug cartels and terror networks — are using this form of illegal trade to profit and bolster their operations.”

Thieves are grabbing items like Amazon, UPS and FedEx packages. They’ve also targeted packages containing clothing and health supplies, including COVID-19 testing kits and even epi-pens, which in many cases can be a critical life-saving device.

Karen Smith, a criminal analyst and former investigator who lives in Los Angeles, tells InsideSources many factors are at play far beyond Gascon’s soft-on-crime approach. She says adding more cops on the beat around the tracks is no easy task — if they can be increased at all.

“When you have a huge caseload, you have to prioritize,” Smith said. “I am not saying it is right or wrong, but violent crimes get precedent.”

In addition, Union Pacific has its own officers protecting the trains and rail yards using drones and a high-tech detection system. Its officers have made hundreds of arrests and handed over suspects to L.A. County authorities. But many of them are never prosecuted.

“You are dealing with the prosecutor’s office,” Smith said, “who may also have a shortage of people and prioritizing calls and types of calls has become a precedent.”

The USA-IT strategy is to take enforcement to the commerce side of the equation, working with websites where the stolen goods are often sold. During a Washington, D.C., roundtable in December, Hernan Albamonte, head of U.S. Illicit Trade Prevention for Philip Morris International, said a national strategy is needed to make it harder to sell stolen goods online, reducing the profit margin for organized gangs.

“We need to change the ratio of risk to profit to make this business less attractive for the criminals,” Albamonte said. As long as the profitable pipeline for retail profits remains, thieves will find something, somewhere to steal to fill it.


Scott Kimbler is a veteran journalist based in Atlanta. He wrote this for InsideSources.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Little poetry, lots of partying in ‘The Laureate’

Published

on

Little poetry, lots of partying in ‘The Laureate’

MOVIE REVIEW

“THE LAUREATE”

Rated R. On VOD.

Grade: B

A biographical film about the World War I veteran, poet and novelist Robert Graves (Tom Hughes), “The Laureate” begins after the war when “war poet” Robert, his artist and illustrator wife Nancy Nicholson (Laura Haddock) and their young daughter Catherine (Indica Watson) live together at a cozy home dubbed World’s End. Their lives are happy aside from Robert’s frequent nightmares of the battlefield. Seriously wounded, Graves was thought to have been killed in France. His mother even received a telegram confirming it.

When Robert expresses admiration for the poetry of American writer and proto-feminist Laura Riding (Dianna Agron of “Glee,” also a producer), Nancy asks him to invite her to stay with them. As Nancy says in a voice-over, she “invited a serpent into (their) home.”

In London, Robert spends time with fellow poets T.S. Eliot (Christien Anholt) and Siegfried Sassoon (Timothy Renouf) and publisher Jonathan Cape (Edward Bennett). The expected flirtation with Laura begins. But, surprisingly, she and Nancy initiate an affair first. Laura is a Jew from New York City’s Lower East Side. But she looks and almost sounds like she could be English herself.

Soon, the three adults are enjoying a happy threesome, and Robert has broken free of the writer’s block he was experiencing. He gets a marvelous offer to write a biography of his friend T. E. Lawrence for the princely sum of 300 pounds. But it must be written in London in three months. Given the copious partying going on in London with Laura and Robert’s new friends, none of whom appear to have any pants, it’s amazing to hear later that Robert actually found time to write the book.

Enter Geoffrey Phibbs (Fra Fee), a young Irish poet that Laura takes a fancy to and who soon becomes part of this libidinous literary daisy chain. “The Laureate” is one of those biographical films that make the mistake of neglecting the artistry that makes its subject fascinating and famous and replacing it with the banal and familiar details of his or her rocky love life. Graves became famous to the world as the author of “I, Claudius,” “The Golden Fleece,” “The White Goddess” and his World War I memoir “Good-Bye to All That.” All of these are still in print. But you will hear very little about any one of them except an offhand reference by Graves about a book about ”ancient Rome.” Oh, that.

Tom Hughes stars in ‘The Laureate’ as World War I veteran, poet and novelist Robert Graves.

American writer-director William Nunez (TV’s “The Beat with Ari Melber”) gives “The Laureate” a “Downton Abbey” look and feel. Leading man Hughes (“Red Joan”) appears to have a chestnut-colored collie on top of his head. I thought of his dangling forelock as the creature’s wagging tail. His Graves seems literary enough, if also rather monotonous and gloomy. Why doesn’t he talk about his work? It has to be more interesting than that night’s tipsy shag.

As Nancy, Haddock has more to offer since Nancy is an artist, wife and mother, and she has more sexuality to bring to the table after Laura arrives. Laura awakens something within both Robert and Nancy. Agron is mysterious and charismatic as Cornell graduate and award-winning poet Riding. But she cannot do anything to stop Riding from being the venomous villain Nancy refers to in the opening voice-over.

“The Laureate” is not bad. But the author of “I, Claudius” deserves more than a soap opera.

(“The Laureate” contains sexually suggestive scenes, nudity and profanity.)

google news
Continue Reading

Trending

Continue in browser
To install tap Add to Home Screen
Add to Home Screen
RecentlyHeard News
Get our web app. It won't take up space on your phone.
Install
See this post in...
RecentlyHeard News
Chrome
Add RecentlyHeard News to Home Screen
Close

For an optimized experience on mobile, add RecentlyHeard News shortcut to your mobile device's home screen

1) Press the share button on your browser's menu bar
2) Press 'Add to Home Screen'.