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Eureka just made ‘handle flipping’ illegal to curb car break-ins

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Eureka just made ‘handle flipping’ illegal to curb car break-ins

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. — The City of Eureka passed an ordinance that makes it illegal for people to check door handles to see if they can find one that is unlocked.

“If you’re going to steal a car, steal it somewhere else. Don’t steal it in Eureka,” said Eureka Mayor Sean Flower.

The mayor said the new ordinance is part of the city’s crackdown on car break-ins and thefts.

“It makes it illegal for someone to go and check a bunch of car doors by pulling on the handles to find one that’s unlocked,” said Flower. “You can’t get in somebody else’s car or tamper with it inside if it’s not your car.”

Mayor Flower said this is considered a lower-level crime but hopes it will stop further car crimes. He said if authorities catch someone committing these crimes, the police department will now have their information on record too.

“We can have our cops get involved early, and really try and discourage people from doing that early, and plus we can also get their information, we can start trying to prevent crime as opposed to waiting for it to happen afterward,” Flower said.

He said other municipalities and police departments have been contacting them to get guidance on the language of their ordinances. Flower said he hopes other cities follow suit.

Eureka’s neighbor, the city of Wildwood, has already started to. Wildwood Mayor Jim Bowlin said the city is introducing similar ordinances at its meeting Monday. Mayor Bowlin said Wildwood has seen a 300% increase in car break-ins in recent years. He said he would be surprised if the ordinances don’t pass.

“It’s going to send a message — don’t commit crimes in Wildwood,” Wildwood Mayor Jim Bowlin said. “The western part of St. Louis County is seeing an uptick in these car crimes.”

Similar bills were introduced in St. Louis County but have not been officially passed yet.

In St. Louis City, a bill was passed that makes it “unlawful for an individual to lift the door handles or otherwise try the doors and locks of successive vehicles to gain entry to the vehicles unless the individual is the owner of the vehicles or has the owners’ permission to enter the vehicles.”

However, St. Louis City Mayor Tishaura Jones said in October that she wants to work on the provisions of the bill. Despite that, the bill went into effect without her signature.

other coverage to link to https://fox2now.com/news/missouri/st-louis-county-council-introduces-3-bills-to-curb-increase-in-car-crime/

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Streaking Nuggets not apologizing for close call vs. Nets: “We’re not judging the wins”

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Streaking Nuggets not apologizing for close call vs. Nets: “We’re not judging the wins”

BROOKLYN, N.Y. – Somewhere over Ohio, Nuggets coach Michael Malone found some enlightenment.

As the Nuggets bounced from the Midwest to New York amid the start of their latest six-game road trip, it dawned on Malone that something about this season wasn’t the same as his previous two decades in the NBA.

The veteran coach realized that the COVID-crunched schedule had all-but eliminated practice times. The only reason the Nuggets were in Brooklyn on Wednesday night for their 124-118 win over the Nets – the team’s third trip to New York in less than two months – was to make up a postponed game. Which meant a six-game road trip instead of five, and three games in four nights instead of a rare, extended stay in New Orleans.

Malone reasoned that he was getting unnecessarily upset with his team for defensive mistakes or other simple fixes that often come with practice time. In fact, in poring over game film, he spotted the same miscues with other teams, too.

“When you don’t have that (practice), sometimes it’s infuriating,” he said. “I just gotta calm the hell down.”

All you need to do is keep one eye trained on the action and one eye on Malone to get a pulse for what the team’s huddles sound like. The fiery coach is not subtle. He’ll dip his face into his hands, lean back and stare at the ceiling or sometimes just turn his back to the action in disgust. The tells occurred several times at Barclay’s Center on Wednesday night.

But in the lighter moments after Wednesday’s win, the team’s third in a row and eighth in its last 11, Malone acknowledged that he needs to recalibrate at times.

“Enjoy the wins,” he said. “Was it pretty? Did we play great? Could we have been better? Of course we could.”

It’s a lesson team president Tim Connelly is constantly harping on. Buried in the trenches of the nightly schedule, it’s hard to see a bigger picture, for anyone, let alone a coach so invested in his team’s result.

Which brought him to halftime of Wednesday night, with his team trailing by 11 to the skeleton Nets. Kevin Durant hadn’t splashed jumpers, Kyrie Irving hadn’t criss-crossed defenders and James Harden hadn’t bullied his way to the free-throw line. The Nets’ Big 3 were all out.

Instead of laying into his team, something he said he was tired of doing, he challenged them. He put the onus on their effort, and the Nuggets responded. Their 70-53 second half was a resounding affirmation of his decision to let his players dictate the result.

Austin Rivers came alive, skipping into timeouts and jousting with the crowd, in a way that energized Denver on the second night of a back-to-back. His 25 points and seven 3-pointers were a beautiful reminder that on a team as unselfish as the Nuggets, almost anyone has the potential to go off.

And Rivers, a 10-year veteran who’s seen the business end of the NBA more than once, knows how much harder this season is than most. He’s not apologizing for scraping out a victory against veterans like LaMarcus Aldridge or Patty Mills or a promising rookie like Cam Thomas.

“We’re taking wins,” Rivers said. “We’re not judging the wins.”

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Public health expert Dr. Ashish Jha: ‘We can’t be fearful of this virus’

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Public health expert Dr. Ashish Jha: ‘We can’t be fearful of this virus’

One of the world’s preeminent COVID-19 scholars joined Lowell U.S. Rep. Lori Trahan on Facebook Live, where he allayed fears about the omicron variant sweeping through the country.

“This virus is going to be with us for a long time,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, a physician, health policy researcher and the dean of the Brown University School of Public Health. “We can’t be locked down. We can’t be shut down. We also can’t be fearful of this virus — we now know how to manage it.”

Jha added that, both nationally and in Massachusetts, “we have turned the corner in the last five, seven days,” he said. Although the Bay State saw very high rates of infection, they’re now down about 50% from their peak. Although he expects hospitalizations to soon decrease, “it’s going to be a little bit longer before hospitals really feel any sense of relief.”

Given these numbers, Jha said it’s still prudent to wear a mask. However, he said it would also make sense to pull back on the mask restrictions when cases drop in a few weeks.

Jha later expanded on this idea, envisioning a future where mayors or governors recommend or require mask-wearing for a month at a time while infections or a new variant spread, then drop it again as cases subside. He noted on Twitter that doing so keeps people from becoming restriction-fatigued.

Jha offered a series of recommendations for combating COVID-19, including rapid testing before spending time with senior or other immunocompromised people.

On a broader scale, he recommended using a lull in infections to make bigger investments in public health.

“Let’s make sure we have just an absolutely massive amount of testing widely available, so that the next time there’s a surge that begins to happen, we flood the zone,” he said. “Let’s make sure that we build up our stockpile of therapeutics. We now have treatments that are gonna make an enormous difference in making this virus even less deadly.”

He also advocated for expanding the wastewater surveillance system that began here in Massachusetts, eventually expanding to other pathogens beyond COVID-19, and to the entire U.S.

Overall, “we have to invest in the science,” he said. “I mean, what’s bailed us out of this pandemic is the science.”

He advocated for increased investments in the NIH and other public health entities.

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Massachusetts could miss out on same-day voter registration if House leaders get their way

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Massachusetts could miss out on same-day voter registration if House leaders get their way

House lawmakers have teed up debate on a voting rights reform bill that would permanently expand early voting opportunities and make voting-by-mail a standard option in future elections, but excludes same-day registration provisions already approved by the state Senate.

“We’ll listen to the debate and see if someone changes my mind,” House Speaker Ron Mariano said on Monday, when asked if he would support same-day registration. The Quincy Democrat previously voted against the provision last year when it was offered unsuccessfully as an amendment to a broader COVID-19 relief bill.

House members will debate the so-called VOTES Act on Thursday. Unless same-day registration is included, it sets up a showdown with Senate, which in October passed it’s own version of the bill intended to enshrine into law popular changes in voting rules made to minimize health risks amid the pandemic.

While the decision to leave out same-day voter registration puts them at odds with their colleagues in the Senate, it could be a strategy to avoid a potential veto on the larger voting rights expansion package from Gov. Charlie Baker.

The outgoing Republican governor last year knocked “the complexity” of the provision.

But U.S. Rep. Ayanna Pressley, who represents parts of Boston, weighed in saying she’s “deeply disappointed” that the House bill excluded same-day voter registration and urged House lawmakers to “swiftly reverse course.”

“Same-day registration is critical to boosting voter turnout, especially among Black, brown, low-income, and immigrant communities, and arbitrary voter registration deadlines should not be a barrier to exercising the right to vote,” Pressley said in a statement.

There’s still a chance House lawmakers could slip same-day registration into the bill via an amendment. Rep. Lindsay Sabadosa of Northampton had already filed a same-day registration amendment by Wednesday afternoon. And 84 House members co-sponsored the original VOTES Act filed by Rep. John Lawn, of Watertown, which included same-day registration.

“We have talked to so many legislators over the past few days and same-day registration is still so popular, so we are excited about working with many members of the House on an amendment,” said Geoff Foster, executive director of Common Cause Massachusetts.

Herald wire services contributed to this report.

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