Connect with us

News

Mike Pence’s former top aide cooperating with Jan. 6 panel

Published

on

Mike Pence’s former top aide cooperating with Jan. 6 panel

WASHINGTON — The former chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence is cooperating with the House panel investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Marc Short was at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and accompanied Pence as he fled his post presiding over the Senate and hid from rioters who were calling for his hanging. Short is cooperating with the panel after receiving a subpoena, according to the person, who was granted anonymity to discuss the private interactions.

Former President Donald Trump was openly criticizing his vice president even as the insurrectionists broke into the building because Pence had said he would not try to unilaterally reject the electoral count as Congress certified President Joe Biden’s victory. Pence didn’t have the legal power to do so, but Trump pressured him anyway.

As Pence’s top aide, Short was also present for several White House meetings ahead of the insurrection. At one point, Trump banned Short from the White House grounds because he objected to the pressure on Pence to reject the legitimate election results.

CNN first reported Short’s cooperation and subpoena.

Some people close to Pence were furious about the way that Trump tried to scapegoat the former vice president on Jan. 6 and became even more incensed after Pence, his closest aides and his family were put in physical danger by the rioters.

Alyssa Farah, who served as Pence’s press secretary before taking on other roles and left her job at the White House before Jan. 6, voluntarily met with Republicans on the House select committee and provided information.

In a series of tweets as the insurrection unfolded, Farah urged Trump to condemn the riots as they were happening and call on his supporters to stand down. “Condemn this now, @realDonaldTrump,” she tweeted. “You are the only one they will listen to. For our country!”

The panel in November subpoenaed Keith Kellogg, who was Pence’s national security adviser, writing in the subpoena that he was with Trump as the attack unfolded and may “have direct information about the former president’s statements about, and reactions to, the Capitol insurrection.” The committee wrote that according to several accounts, Kellogg urged Trump to send out a tweet aimed at helping to control the crowd.

google news

News

Boston Police commissioner search committee hears input

Published

on

Boston Police commissioner search committee hears input

The search committee for the next Boston Police commissioner hasn’t settled on any candidates yet, Mayor Michelle Wu said at the start of a meeting geared toward getting locals’ opinions about what they want in the city’s next top cop.

Wu told the 200-plus people assembled that the commission hasn’t “ID’d or spoken with” anyone yet to lead the department, and said that they want to hear from the community first, starting with the meeting Thursday night and then with at least one more.

The suggestions came in largely around what priorities for the new top cop should be. Different people suggested focuses on gun violence, mental health — both responding to calls about it and also the cops’ own wellbeing — response times, “social justice,” gender violence, transparency and accountability for officers who break the rules.

Of course, some people had completely different options about who should be commissioner. One man toward the start of the meeting said the city should look outside the department for a fresh set of eyes and a willingness to shake things up. Near the end, another man said the city should promote from within to find someone who knows the streets.

The next police commissioner will be the first permanent head of the department in what will be more than a year. Now-former Police Commissioner William Gross departed in the early days of last February amid rumors of a mayoral run — though health issues ultimately sidelined him. Then-Mayor Martin Walsh quickly appointed Gross’ replacement, the commissioner’s chief of staff Dennis White, but White only lasted a couple of days on the job before decades-old domestic allegations surfaced.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Long COVID study: Boston researchers recruiting long haulers who are having trouble concentrating, experiencing strong fatigue

Published

on

Long COVID study: Boston researchers recruiting long haulers who are having trouble concentrating, experiencing strong fatigue

As tens of millions of Americans continue to battle long-term coronavirus symptoms, Boston researchers are hoping to crack the mystery of Long COVID and what’s sparking the debilitating condition for so many people.

Hub scientists are recruiting adults who had acute COVID-19 more than two months ago and are still experiencing symptoms, such as trouble concentrating and abnormally strong fatigue.

The brain scan study will be done in-person in Charlestown, so the long hauler study participants must be in the Boston area.

“We’re looking to try to understand what’s happening,” neuroscience researcher Michael VanElzakker, with the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital, told the Herald on Thursday.

Since VanElzakker put out the call for long haulers on social media, people have been “really appreciative,” he said.

“Those who are dealing with this condition are really worried, and they’re hoping they get studied,” he added.

Nearly 20 million Americans are suffering from Long COVID, which is scientifically termed Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC).

That 20 million American estimate is from the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Of those 20 million people, about 387,000 long haulers live in Massachusetts.

VanElzakker had been studying chronic fatigue syndrome before the pandemic. Many people with that disease initially have some type of viral infection.

“Studying that, I knew what was coming when COVID hit,” VanElzakker said. “There would be a subset of people who wouldn’t get better.”

google news
Continue Reading

News

Boston College’s $100M Pine Manor Institute for Student Success to offer free courses

Published

on

Boston College’s $100M Pine Manor Institute for Student Success to offer free courses

Boston College will introduce a free summer enrichment program in June for middle and high schoolers, and an associate’s-degree-granting two-year residential college in 2024, both to broaden opportunities for underrepresented, first-generation students, the university said Thursday.

Both initiatives are part of the university’s $100 million Pine Manor Institute for Student Success, established in 2020 when Boston College and Pine Manor College signed an integration agreement that included a $50 million commitment from Boston College, which has grown to $100 million through investment returns and an anonymous pledge of $25 million.

Through the Pine Minor Institute for Students Success, the residential summer enrichment program for middle and high school students, called the Academy, will be hosted on the BC campus.

“Boston College realizes there are students who need a college degree or an opportunity to do better in middle or high school,” said University President William P. Leahy. “The goal is to match need with opportunity … so that their world’s been widened, their horizon’s been broadened.”

Beginning with a group of 40 middle school students, the Academy will offer summer courses in English, math and science for students nominated by principals, teachers, counselors or religious and community leaders.

During the school year, the students will receive academic support from trained BC success coaches and mentoring from BC undergraduate and graduate students to help the Academy students navigate the journey from middle school to college.

As they advance through high school, students also will receive training in public speaking, time management, SAT/ACT prep, and the college application process. In the summer before their senior year, they will take a college-credit course to help enhance their college readiness.

The two-year college division of Boston College will be called Messina College, named after the first Jesuit school founded in Sicily in 1548. It will offer an associate’s degree program for 100 students annually, beginning in the 2024-25 school year, with the goal of preparing students for continued studies in a bachelor’s degree program or for a professional career.

Messina College will be located on the former Pine Manor College campus in Brookline, and its students will have full access to Boston College’s campus programs and facilities. Successful students will be eligible to apply to transfer to Boston College to complete a bachelor’s degree.

The final component of the Pine Manor Institute will be an ongoing outreach initiative that will provide support for graduates of the Academy and Messina College throughout the completion of their academic studies and into their professional careers.

Together, these offerings aim to expand upon Boston College’s success in educating under-resourced, first-generation students, while continuing Pine Manor College’s legacy of outreach to underserved communities.

 

 

 

 

 

google news
Continue Reading

Trending