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Trial underway for wife in death of Missouri snake breeder

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Trial underway for wife in death of Missouri snake breeder

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The wife of a Missouri snake breeder who was found dead in 2017 is on trial for first-degree murder.

Lynlee Renick is charged in the death of Ben Renick, whose body was found at his snake breeding business in New Florence.

Authorities said Lynlee Renick initially told investigators her husband was crushed by one of his snakes.

During opening arguments Monday in Boone County, Renick’s attorney said one of Lynette Renick’s ex-boyfriends, Michael Humphrey, was solely responsible for Ben Renick’s death.

Prosecutors said Lynlee Renick killed her husband because she was a beneficiary of his $1 million life insurance policy and her spa business was struggling financially.

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More cowbell: Protests outside of Michelle Wu’s house continue, but sound a bit different

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More cowbell: Protests outside of Michelle Wu’s house continue, but sound a bit different

The anti-vaccine-mandate protesters outside Mayor Michelle Wu’s house have swapped out bullhorns for cowbells after the cops reportedly made it clear they’d start confiscating noise amplifiers.

On Thursday morning, protesters clanged cowbells and blew whistles as they saw Wu off as she left her house for work.

They ditched their characteristic bullhorns after the police precinct commander told residents in a small community meeting that police would confiscate bullhorns, which locals have complained protesters have used in ways that have woken up kids and elderly relatives early in the morning. The police comments were first reported by Universal Hub following the meeting earlier in the week.

Anti-vaccine-mandate protesters have demonstrated on and off outside of Wu’s house for weeks after the mayor announced a pair of changes that went into effect this past weekend. Now, city workers all need to get vaccinated against COVID-19, and many Boston businesses including restaurants must require proof of vaccination from patrons.

Wu’s complained of the heated rhetoric from the protesters, who have yelled obscenities at her and called her “Hitler” along with more common types of chants like “Shame on Wu.”

The protesters had diverted from Wu’s Roslindale home for a few days to heckle Council President Ed Flynn outside his South Boston residence. They called the Navy vet a “communist” and “traitor” for siding with the mayor.

Protesters have tended toward hitting pols’ houses — with varying degrees of legality — over the past couple of years in the Bay State. Gov. Charlie Baker faced demonstrators from the left and the right, who essentially alternated protesting at his Swampscott home. At one point, a demonstrator protesting the situation at Mass and Cass threw used syringes on the sidewalk. Another man just strolled on into the governor’s house.

In Boston, left-wing protesters advocating for more police cuts in 2020 used heavy-duty glue to paste report cards on the property of all of the city councilors who voted for the mayor’s budget.

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New Hampshire detectives pin cold case murder of Massachusetts woman on dead man

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New Hampshire detectives pin cold case murder of Massachusetts woman on dead man

Investigators have pinned the New Hampshire murder of a Haverhill woman that had remained unsolved for nearly 50 years on a man who died in 2019.

Arlene Clevesy was 48 years old when her nude body was spotted by a local fisherman near Hume Brook in Newton, N.H., on June 4, 1972, according to a N.H. Attorney General Office report. An autopsy found the cause of death to be “traumatic asphyxia, including drowning.”

Investigators re-opened the case in 2015 and announced Thursday they had determined Albert Francis Moore Jr. was the killer. In 1977, Moore was indicted by a grand jury on a second-degree murder charge in connection with Clevesy’s death. Prosecutors decided not to pursue the case in 1979 because Moore was serving a life sentence for the 1972 killing of Donald Rimer in Salem.

Moore, 88, died on Nov. 11, 2019, of metastatic prostate cancer, the N.H. Cold Case Unit said.

Harold Clevesy, Arlene’s husband, had told police they had gone out for drinks in Haverhill the night before. She had stayed out when he left for home. Witnesses later said that they had seen Arlene Clevesy leave in a truck with Moore.

The attorney general’s office said through the years, Moore “made a series of admissions … about his responsibility for Ms. Clevesy’s death,” including that he had “beaten” a polygraph exam when he was asked questions about her.

Moore also had admitted in other accounts during the 1970s that he had driven Clevesy to a wooded, secluded area, became violent with her, killed her and left her lying face-down in the water, the report said.

Herald wire services contributed to this report.

A 1972 artist sketch of the Arlene Clevesy homicide scene in Newton, N.H. (N.H. Attorney General’s Office)
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Jamaica Plain public housing development targeted for big investments this year

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Jamaica Plain public housing development targeted for big investments this year

A large Jamaica Plain public housing complex is in for a big year, as Mayor Michelle Wu is looking to put $50 million toward capital improvements to the Mildred C. Hailey apartments — which already are set as the site of a big project this year.

Wu swung by the 766-unit Hailey complex — named after a longtime housing activist who lived there — on Thursday to make the announcement alongside residents and other officials.

“These funds will go toward improving plumbing and ventilation, renovating windows, kitchens and bathrooms across 526 units of housing,” Wu said.

She added that the money, which requires the approval of the City Council to go forward, would come from a combination of federal recovery funds and the city’s capital budget.

“When we make an investment in public housing, we are making an investment in the working class people of the city,” new City Councilor Kendra Lara said.

The Mildred C. Hailey apartments were built in stages — one chunk in 1941, another 1952 and a third in 1964. People in the apartments — officials said about 50% of residents are seniors and 30% children — generally pay 30% of their income as rent.

“The only thing pulling the median income down from being stratospherically high is the public housing that we built in the 1940s,” said Kenzie Bok, a city councilor who formerly worked on policy for the Boston Housing Authority. “It is the only way that we are keeping low-income people in many of the neighborhoods of the city including JP.”

This is actually just one of two big changes coming to the Hailey apartments starting this year. The BHA is entering into a public-private partnership that would result in a developer knocking down and rebuilding 253 public housing units, and adding about 435 new “affordable and upper middle-income apartments,” according to the Boston Planning & Development Agency’s summary of the project.

The BHA is working with The Community Builders, the JP Community Development Corp. and Urban Edge — for the purposes of this project they’re all are coming together as Centre Street Partners — who all are developers that focus on affordable housing.

This overhaul didn’t come up much at the press conference, but construction is expected to start this fall. It’s the latest of various versions of this approach. The BHA has similar plans on deck at the Mary Ellen McCormack development in Southie and Bunker Hill in Charlestown.

“These renovations combined with the new housing plan with Centre Street Partners will really bring this site forward to serve generations of families,” Bennett said at the press conference.

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