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A skier from Nederland died Tuesday at Eldora Ski Area

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A skier from Nederland died Tuesday at Eldora Ski Area

A local skier died Tuesday at the Eldora Ski Area after hitting a tree.

At about 10:25 a.m., ski patrol members found the 60-year-old man lying in the trees along the Hot Dog Alley ski run, according to a Boulder County Sheriff’s Office news release.

The skier, from Nederland, was unconscious and the ski patrol began first aid including CPR, the release said. The man, who was skiing alone, was pronounced dead, at 11 a.m. in a first-aid room.

On Nov. 30, a skier, a 72-year-old man, died in a collision with a snowboarder at Eldora.

 

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Ramsey County confronting some 200 employees in violation of vaccination policy; most are in sheriff’s office

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Ramsey County confronting some 200 employees in violation of vaccination policy; most are in sheriff’s office

Nearly a third of the Ramsey County sheriff’s office employees are in violation of the county’s policy to either get vaccinated against the coronavirus or be tested weekly, county officials said Tuesday.

The county’s policy went into effect Nov. 1 for its roughly 5,000 employees who are either permanent, temporary, intermittent or seasonal. Under the policy, employees who do not comply could face a five-day suspension starting Feb. 14, County Manager Ryan O’Connor told the County Board of Commissioners on Tuesday.

According to the county, nearly 94 percent of the employees have certified to their vaccination status, with 82 percent of them providing proof that they are fully vaccinated, which means they’ve taken two shots.

As far as actual numbers, 276 employees have not certified their vaccination status with the county, O’Connor said. Of those employees, 24 said they are fully vaccinated and uploaded proof of vaccination, but did not certify. Another 19 intermittent employees are not working, but said they would certify their status if called upon to work. Another 51 employees are on leave status.

That leaves 182 remaining employees who have not certified their status, with 134 from the sheriff’s office, according to O’Connor.

“So we are seeing a localized challenge of compliance at this point,” he said. “We continue to work directly with the sheriff and his leadership team to seek compliance.”

Ann Feaman, Ramsey County’s human resources deputy director, wrote in a Tuesday update to the county’s executive team that all departments have reported that they either issued written reprimands to employees who remain out of compliance or they are in the process of doing so this week “with one exception — the sheriff’s office.”

“I have not heard anything official from the sheriff’s office except that they acknowledged receipt of HR’s message,” she wrote.

Ramsey County Sheriff Bob Fletcher did not return a call Tuesday seeking comment.

Allison Schaber, president of the Ramsey County Deputies’ Federation, said Tuesday night that it supports the policy, “while recognizing that it gives our employees the right to choose whether or not to be vaccinated or get tested.” However, she said, Tuesday was the first the federation heard of the scope of the noncompliance with the county policy.

“So for them to jump right to a five-day suspension without prior notice of noncompliance, we feel is excessive and out of step with progressive discipline,” she said.

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U.S. Senate debate: Michael Bennet’s GOP challengers talk immigration, spending, national defense and more

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Biden decries ‘big lie,’ blames Trump for insurrection

Republicans aiming to unseat U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet stated their cases Tuesday night to challenge the incumbent Democrat in November.

There’s a lot they agreed on: The country needs stricter immigration enforcement, more policing and more military funding. Government spending is out of control. Ronald Reagan was a hero. It’s important for Republicans to make greater efforts to connect with non-white and unaffiliated voters.

The debate, held at Colorado Christian University in Lakewood, was hosted by the state Republican Party and was moderated by its chair, Kristi Burton Brown, and Michael Fields, who works to advance conservative fiscal policy and leads the newly formed Advance Colorado Institute. As a result, none of the candidates were challenged directly or made to field uncomfortable questions.

Participating Tuesday were Eli Bremer, a former Olympian and El Paso County GOP official; Gino Campana, a Fort Collins developer and Donald Trump appointee; Ron Hanks, a state representative from Fremont County who once ran unsuccessfully for Congress in California; Deborah Flora, a former talk radio host and parental rights advocate; Greg Moore, a political scientist who works at Colorado Christian University; and Peter Yu, a Loveland native who previously ran and lost the race for Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District.

Candidate Joe O’Dea, a construction company owner who has loaned himself about half a million dollars, recently took a break from campaigning to have back surgery and was absent for the forum.

Burton Brown has sought to cast the Colorado GOP as the party of affordability, low crime and educational opportunity. She has said she’s severed ties with FEC United, the grassroots conservative group that has an active citizen militia wing and many ties to 2020 election denial efforts. The line of questioning from she and Fields reflected the attempt to focus the party on “kitchen-table” issues in 2022.

But the issues that matter to FEC United’s leadership evidently matter greatly to many Republican voters, who at multiple candidate forums this year have chosen Hanks as their favorite in post-forum straw polls. They’re supported in elected office, too; just last week most state House Republicans voted on failed amendments to thank people who marched at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, and to call into question the results of the 2020 election.

Hanks is the candidate among the bunch who is by far the most vocal in his belief that there was widespread voter fraud in 2020, and he marched in D.C. on Jan. 6.

He distinguished himself from the rest on Tuesday by speaking with a uniquely uncompromising tone — including when he proposed to do away entirely with permits for gun ownership and likened the government to a “cancer.” Asked which Republican official he identifies most with, Hanks said he’s his own person and doesn’t want to emulate anyone else.

To that same question, Bremer and Moore responded Fla. Gov. Ron DeSantis; Campana responded U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton; Yu responded S.D. Gov. Kristi Noem; and Flora said she admires U.S. Sen. Rand Paul.

“I could not wait to join him and take Fauci on,” said Flora, criticizing U.S. pandemic response.

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Where did D’Angelo Russell learn to draw fouls? ‘Lou Will University’

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Where did D’Angelo Russell learn to draw fouls? ‘Lou Will University’

The Timberwolves’ D’Angelo Russell rarely attacks the rim. He takes fewer than four shots a game from inside 10 feet.

Yet somehow the guard averages 3.5 free-throws a game — the same number as Anthony Edwards, who penetrates into the paint on a regular basis. While Edwards draws his fouls via shear brute force, Russell does so with craft.

The 25-year-old — who was averaging eight free-throws a game over Minnesota’s last two contests entering Tuesday’s game in Portland — is adept at sensing when something as simple as a defender’s hands are in the wrong place, and is able to move his arms to draw contact and a whistle.

The “rip through” move in which the offensive player swings his arms through the defender’s hands was declared to not be a shooting foul in recent years, leading fewer players to use the move. Yet Russell still goes to it whenever Minnesota is in the bonus, giving him two easy free-throws whenever it’s called.

“He’s such a smart basketball player, he knows what’s going on at every little moment. He’s always thinking the game, knows all of the situations,” Timberwolves coach Chris Finch said. “He’s pretty crafty with the ball in traffic. He does have a knack for drawing fouls.”

Minnesota’s rotational choices of late have had Russell off the floor at the end of the first and third quarters, even when the Wolves are in the bonus. But, Finch noted, when the opportunity to get to the line presents itself, Russell seizes it.

When Russell was a young player in the league, playing for the Los Angeles Lakers, he said he attended “Lou Will University.” He watched veteran teammate Lou Williams draw contact and calls through a variety of subtle methods. Russell took note.

“I learned all of that from him. Guarding him in practice, watching him do it from the bench, fool the refs every night,” Russell said. “I just felt like that I could add it to my game.”

BEVERLEY OUT AGAIN

Patrick Beverley missed his second straight game with a sprained ankle that Finch described as not “too, too severe,” though the coach added injuries like that often lead to more than one missed contest.

TOWNS ON BONDS

Count Karl-Anthony Towns as a member of the camp that was disgruntled by Barry Bonds’ omission from the Baseball Hall of Fame. Towns stumped for Bonds’ inclusion in the hall earlier in the day Tuesday, tweeting “This man should be in the HOF @BarryBonds. Ya’ll trippin if you think otherwise.”

When news circulated that Bonds did not receive the call, Towns quote-tweeted the news with a facepalm emoji.

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