Connect with us

News

Congressional leaders reach deal to hike debt limit

Published

on

Congressional leaders reach deal to hike debt limit

WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders reached an elaborate deal Tuesday that will allow Democrats to lift the nation’s debt limit without any votes from Republicans, likely averting another last-minute rush to avoid a federal default. Hours later, the House passed legislation overwhelmingly along party lines that kicked off a multi-step process.

Congress approved a $480 billion increase in the nation’s debt limit in October. That’s enough for the Treasury to finance the government’s operations through Dec. 15, according to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen’s projection.

But Republicans have warned they won’t vote for any future debt ceiling increase to ensure the federal government can meet its financial obligations, and instead, the politically unpopular measure would have to be passed entirely by the Democratic majority in both chambers of Congress.

President Joe Biden had called on Republicans to “get out of the way” if they won’t help Democrats shoulder the debt responsibility. But rather than step aside and allow for a quick vote, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has helped engineer an unusual legislative process that will play out over the next several days. Donald Trump, the former president, ridiculed McConnell for allowing any action, showing just how politically toxic the routine act of paying the nation’s bills has become.

“I think this is in the best interest of the country,” said McConnell, R-Ky. “I think it is also in the best interest of Republicans, who feel very strongly that the previous debt ceilings we agreed to when President Trump was here carried us through August. And this current debt ceiling is indeed about the future and not about the past.”

The agreement spelled out in the House bill passed Tuesday establishes the days-long process ahead. In short, it would tuck a provision to fast-track the debt limit process into an unrelated Medicare bill that will prevent payment cuts to doctors and other health care providers. That measure passed the House by a vote of 222-212 with only Republican, Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, siding with Democrats in voting for the measure.

“House Republicans can’t support using patients and access to local doctors as leverage to increase the national debt on our children,” said Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas.

The measure now goes to the Senate, and if the Medicare bill becomes law, it will open the process for the Senate to raise the debt ceiling through subsequent legislation with a Democrats’ only majority vote.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., struck an optimistic note that the debt ceiling plan will pass.

“This is a very good outcome for the American people. We will avoid default, which would have been disastrous. Democrats have always said that we were willing to shoulder the load at 50 votes to get this done as long it was not a convoluted or risky process, and Leader McConnell and I have achieved that.”

Key to the agreement is that Democrats will have to vote on a specific amount by which the debt ceiling would be lifted. The amount has not yet been disclosed, but it is sure to be a staggering sum. Republicans want to try to blame Democrats for the nation’s rising debt load and link it to Biden’s $1.85 trillion social and environmental bill.

“To have Democrats raise the debt ceiling and be held politically accountable for racking up more debt is my goal, and this helps us accomplish that,” said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas.

The increase in the debt ceiling, however, is needed to meet financial obligations accrued by both parties under past legislation. The vast majority of it predates Biden’s presidency.

“This is about meeting obligations that the government has already incurred, largely during the Trump Administration,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a letter to Democratic colleagues. “Only three percent of the current debt has been accrued under President Biden.”

Pelosi said that addressing the debt limit will prevent a drastic increase in interest rates for car loans, student debt, mortgages and other types of borrowing for Americans.

The legislation before the House on Tuesday establishes a fast-track process for the days ahead. A subsequent vote will be needed to pass the debt ceiling increase itself. Once the Senate has done so, the House will take up the bill and send it to Biden to be signed into law.

At their private luncheon Thursday, Republican senators sounded off against the plan. Many of them will not support it.

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., a member of GOP leadership, said the lunch discussion went about as would be expected — though he said the plan at least allows Republicans to achieve their goal of forcing Democrats to vote on their own to raise the debt ceiling by a specific amount.

The parliamentary machinations struck some House lawmakers as an “absurd” but necessary way to deal with the Senate, where the filibuster rules allow the Republican minority to block action.

“We’re tying ourselves into parliamentary contortions to try to help the Senate deal with this straitjacket they have put themselves into,” Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., said.

google news

News

Two new Denver bars that’ll feel like vacation in January

Published

on

Two new Denver bars that’ll feel like vacation in January

You deserve a vacation this month. But if you’re like me, you aren’t taking one (because the holidays were expensive, because omicron still surges, and because there just isn’t any time for that).

Enter two new Denver destinations where you can at least feel transported for a night. One will take you to Paris by way of Montreal, and the other will give you a taste of Oaxaca and Mexico City all in one bite.

Cantina Loca

This is the Denver tasting room and bar for chef Dana Rodriguez’s own Doña Loca spirits brand. Rodriguez launched her mezcal and tequila line in 2021 and has been planning this cantina extension of it — her first solo restaurant project — all along.

Hi-Rez Photography, Provided by Cantina Loca

Cocktails from Cantina Loca, which specializes in mezcal and tequila drinks made with Doña Loca house spirits.

“This concept is my dream,” Rodriguez said in a release. “It’s the ultimate representation of Mexican culture through food and drink, in an atmosphere that feels like a true Mexico City cantina.”

Why make the trip: If you’ve been to Rodriguez’s restaurants Work & Class and Super Mega Bien (or even if you haven’t) you’ll want to check out this latest addition to the family. It’s a casual cantina with an artistic streak. Local builders FinArt furnished the space on the ground floor of a LoHi extended stay, and muralist John Rumtum warmed up the concrete walls and brickwork with a loving ode to the agave plant.

Order like a local: There are plenty of agave spirit-based cocktails to order (see requisite palomas and margaritas), but you should also peruse the menu of aguas benditas so you can sip the house brand mezcal on its own, in three distinct styles, and also try other traditional Mexican spirits, such as raicilla (pronounced rai-see-yuh) and sotol (pronounced so-toll). See also tacos and snacks such as tempura cactus, or nopales fritos, and stuffed corn sopes, or picaditas vegetarianas.

Exchange rate: Snacks will set you back $7-$13, tacos cost $3.75-$5 and big plates such as pollo adobado and lamb mixiote are priced at $15-$26. Expect to pay $11-$14 for cocktails, and $9-$30 for sipping mezcal. Beers are also available for $5-$8, and four N/A drinks including horchata and chicha morada cost $6.

Travel plan: The cantina is open Sunday-Thursday from 4-10 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 4-11 p.m. It’s closed on Monday and Tuesday, at 2880 Zuni St., and cantinaloca.com.

1642597461 332 Two new Denver bars thatll feel like vacation in January

Provided by Au Feu Brasserie

Au Feu Brasserie is a new French wine bar and restaurant in Wash Park. You’ll find French bottles and cocktails on the menu alongside a strong selection of Cognac, Armagnac and Eau de Vie.

Au Feu Brasserie

Meet a former RiNo food hall stall that’s all grown up and sophisticated in Washington Park. This French-inspired restaurant started out at Zeppelin Station in 2018 but recently advanced to a brick-and-mortar space next door to Uncle ramen on Pennsylvania Street. And the two businesses make for great date-night neighbors, depending on your mood. At the brasserie, owners Jared and Amanda Leonard were inspired by Montreal’s food scene.

“We ate our way through Montreal while researching the Au Feu concept and fell in love with the French culture of the city,” Jared Leonard said in a release. “We were particularly inspired by restaurants like Joe Beef and Au Pied du Cochon.”

Why make the trip: It’s hard to recognize this space that was once occupied by a burger shop. Now it’s all velvet seating and art deco decor, with the air of a Parisian sitting room. Pair that with a barbecue master’s expert food, which includes a mix of French and Canadian influences (see boeuf bourguignon and house poutine), and you’ll start to see why the Leonards are calling it a “casually indulgent” after-work escape.

Au Feu Brasserie is a new ...

Provided by Au Feu Brasserie

Au Feu Brasserie is a new wine bar and restaurant in Wash Park. You’ll find Montreal-inspired French food, such as this short rib bourguignon.

Order like a local: Leonard tapped Dutch sommelier Jeroen Erens to pick the 65-bottle, all-French wine list, so you’ll want to get his input for your drink order. Aside from wine, there’s a great selection of pre-prohibition European-inspired cocktails (Prince of Wales, Fleur de Lis), as well as cognac, armagnac and eau de vie.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Former CSU Rams football commits search for new opportunities after Jay Norvell pulls scholarship offers

Published

on

Former CSU Rams football commits search for new opportunities after Jay Norvell pulls scholarship offers

Bryce Johnson went to Colorado State last summer on a football recruiting visit and left Fort Collins with a dream scholarship offer to play for the Rams.

“It was Division I football and a full ride in your home state,” said Johnson, a star two-way player for Lutheran High School, and a finalist for The Denver Post’s annual Gold Helmet Award. “That’s a huge opportunity. I jumped on that right away.”

Johnson’s dream turned into a nightmare six months later.

That’s because Johnson’s commitment became null and void in December after the program hired former Nevada coach Jay Norvell to replace fired Steve Addazio as head coach. Johnson is not alone. Norvell’s re-evaluation of the Rams’ 2022 recruiting class led to offers being pulled for a handful of local commits seen as improper fits.

Among those taking their spots: previous Nevada commits and transfers.

“Their staff came in with an entirely different scheme on both sides of the ball. They had a lot of changes that needed to be made. So, they ended up pulling my scholarship to use in the JUCO and transfer portal,” said Johnson, who is now considering New Mexico State, South Dakota State and others. “They talked to me about blue-shirting and getting me in the 2023 class. But they said that wasn’t approved by their compliance.”

Norvell didn’t hide from that uncomfortable truth when speaking to reporters last month during the early signing period.

“It’s not a thing that people like to hear,” Norvell said back on Dec. 15. “That they had a scholarship, they had committed (to CSU) and you’ve got a new coaching staff and you kind of have to start all over again. It’s unfortunate. But it is the reality.”

Where do those former commits go from here? CSU’s 2022 sendoffs are scrambling for new opportunities. Highlands Ranch tight end Jade Arroyo — with 107 career receptions for 1,515 yards and 16 touchdowns — pledged to the Rams back in July. He’s now considering multiple Ivy League programs.

“It’s kind of hard right now. Most schools have already filled up their class for this year,” Arroyo said. “Especially with COVID, there are limited scholarships. I’m just talking to schools with coaches (direct messaging) me on Twitter. I’m just trying to build relationships at the moment.”

The list goes on: Arapahoe outside linebacker Jareb Ramos is also no longer committed to the Rams but recently picked up a scholarship offer from Penn. Addazio’s staff stayed close to home offering scholarships at Fort Collins High School to wide receiver Dorion McGarity and safety Dontay Johnson. Neither player signed with the Rams and their college destinations are still undetermined.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Tensions rising in Boston over mask mandates as pizza manager gets punched by maskless customer

Published

on

Tensions rising in Boston over mask mandates as pizza manager gets punched by maskless customer

In the latest disturbing escalation of tension over COVID-19 mandates, a Regina Pizzeria employee who asked a customer to wear a mask got punched in the face as a response, police reports show.

The maskless suspect entered the legendary pizza restaurant in the North End about 9 p.m. Sunday night and was stopped at the entrance, according to Boston Police.

The suspect pushed his way in, then pushed the victim, a male store general manager, against the register before getting off a punch to the employee’s left side of the face, police reported.

The suspect, a white male believed to be in his mid-20s, fled down the street and has not yet been apprehended, but Boston Police are investigating.

The victim told police that the suspect “stated that he was from the neighborhood” and refused to put on a mask before pushing his way in.

A spokesman for Regina Pizzeria confirmed the assault took place because of the city’s mask mandate but would not give any further details.

“It’s a police (investigation) and we can’t make any comment,” the spokesman said.

The victim experienced “swelling to (his) left cheek” but refused medical treatment at the scene.

This is the second COVID mandate related incident in a Regina Pizzeria in the last few days.

google news
Continue Reading

Trending