Connect with us

News

Colorado weather: Major winter storm to drop up to 3 feet of snow

Published

on

Colorado weather: Major winter storm to drop up to 3 feet of snow

Winter weather alerts are posted for many mountain regions of Colorado as a potent storm is forecast to move across the state. This storm could drop upwards of 3 feet of snow and will pack winds of 50 mph.

First off, if you have travel plans in the mountains between now and Saturday morning, prepare for intense winter driving conditions with possible closures in numerous areas across the state. Some good travel advice can be found below.

There are two waves of snow coming toward Colorado. One will push through by Thursday morning bringing mountain locations light snow. Another will begin to move through Thursday afternoon and last through Friday, and this second pulse of snow is the one that will really pack a punch.

A deepening area of low pressure is forecast to move over Colorado and as it approaches, moisture will be picked up from the Pacific ocean. What the National Weather Service in Grand Junction is calling an Atmospheric river, an anomalous amount of moisture is supposed to funnel towards Colorado. This is arguably the most important factor of this storm — that several inches of liquid precipitation are going to stack up across the mountains bringing some much-needed drought relief. The current snowpack across Colorado is sitting at 52%t of normal and this storm is likely to give a great boost to the numbers statewide.

From Denver to Colorado Springs, this will be a much different storm as less than a quarter of an inch of moisture is expected — if that.

With moisture levels as high as they will be in the mountains, snowfall rates may exceed 2 inches per hour at times. The heaviest of snows will begin Thursday afternoon and last through Friday morning beginning initially in the northern mountains and then pushing south. Winds will be very high with the storm, gusting up to 50 mph at times. This will further exacerbate driving conditions as snow-packed roads are going to be very common anywhere you travel.

When talking snow totals, wind direction plays a huge role in producing big snows. The way this storm is approaching and how it will flow across our area will bring beneficial winds to just about all mountain ranges. From the San Juans near Wolf Creek and Telluride all the way to the Park Range near Steamboat, this storm is likely to deliver so much snow that we will measure it in feet. That means that major to extreme impacts on roads are possible.

Winter Storm Severity Index

 

Forecast snow totals

The Northern Mountains (including the Gore Range, Park Range, Flat Tops and the Gore Range)
1 to 2 feet of snow is expected. This includes areas like Steamboat and Vail.

The Central Mountains (including the Sawatch Mountains and the Elk and West Elk Mountains)
1to 2 feet of snow is expected. This includes areas like Crested Butte, Aspen, Sunlight and Monarch
There could be a few higher totals in these areas.

google news

News

Avalanche’s Nazem Kadri, former DU star Troy Terry voted to NHL All-Star Game

Published

on

Avalanche’s Nazem Kadri, former DU star Troy Terry voted to NHL All-Star Game

Avalanche center Nazem Kadri is headed to his first NHL All-Star Game. So is Colorado native and former Denver Pioneers standout Troy Terry.

google news
Continue Reading

News

DIA sets new record for the number of guns seized at airport security

Published

on

DIA sets new record for the number of guns seized at airport security

Denver International Airport ranked sixth nationally in 2021 for the number of firearms seized by TSA agents at security checkpoints, the Transportation Security Administration announced Tuesday.

In 2021, agents found 141 firearms in travelers carry-on luggage, more than any year since 2018, according to TSA data. Nationally, 5,972 guns were seized at airport security checkpoints. The 141 guns seized set a new record at the Denver airport, the TSA said in a news release.

“As the data suggests, travelers bringing firearms in carry-on luggage is not new and we have now reached an unacceptable level of carelessness by gun owners. Simply stated, one gun in carry-on luggage is one too many,” TSA Federal Security Director for Colorado Larry Nau said in a news release.

Still, the percentage of passengers trying to bring guns onto airplanes is small.

Security agents at DIA screened approximately 18.3 million departing passengers and crew in 2021, making it the sixth busiest airport for TSA security checkpoint screening operations. That is a 72% increase in passenger traffic over 2020, a year where air travel was marred by the coronavirus pandemic.

The airports with the most firearms seized at security in 2021 are:

  • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport , 507
  • Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, 317
  • Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport, 245
  • Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, 196
  • Nashville International Airport, 163.

Travelers caught with firearms at an airport security checkpoint face criminal and civil penalties. Even those with concealed carry permits must check their unloaded weapons in a hard-sided case.

For more information on carrying firearms on an airplane, visit https://www.tsa.gov/travel/transporting-firearms-and-ammunition.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Opinion: Colorado must address workforce age discrimination

Published

on

Opinion: Colorado must address workforce age discrimination

We have a paradox going on in Colorado: employers are desperately looking for talent, and older adults are desperately looking for work. But workforce age discrimination makes it difficult for older Coloradans to fully contribute to the labor market.

For years, older workers from every corner of the state have told me their frustrating and often heartbreaking stories of age discrimination that prevented them from landing needed jobs, that they faced once in the workplace, and that they felt as they were forced out.

Stories like these: a man who was a colleague of mine, a fundraising pro with decades of success who couldn’t get callbacks for development jobs; a former corporate marketing VP who was told that she lost out to a younger applicant because the hiring manager assumed she would not be social media savvy; a group of women in their 60s forced to live on small social security checks — this despite help-wanted signs in almost every store window in their Western Slope town.

Such age discrimination is common: studies from AARP and others show that 78% of workers over 45 have seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace and over one-half of long-time, employees age 50 and over are forced to leave positions before they would voluntarily choose to do so. Once this happens, only 10% of them ever regain their previous economic status.

Nationwide, the country lost $850 billion in GDP due to age discrimination and that could grow to $3.9 trillion by 2050, reports the AARP.

Discrimination based upon age has especially harmful consequences for already economically vulnerable groups like women, people of color, and those with low incomes.

There are many reasons to work toward ending workforce age discrimination. There are ways to do it, and there’s no time to waste.

First off, ending age discrimination is good for business. Older adults provide numerous benefits in the workplace. Intergenerational teams create mentoring opportunities, improve team problem-solving, and increase creativity born from combining different perspectives and histories.

Keeping older workers on the job strengthens economies from Main Street to Wall Street. Ongoing paychecks mean more disposable income spent and more taxes paid, while tax-supported benefits can be delayed.

Older adults also need to continue working: the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that 48% of households headed by a person aged 55 or older lack retirement savings. The median 401(k) balance for those between 55 and 64 is less than $15,000. For older adults who lack adequate savings, continuing to work past the traditional retirement age is an economic necessity.

Last, but not least, older adults want to continue working, and continued workforce participation may be connected to better physical and mental health for older adults.

When the legislature reconvenes in January, we can change our workforce discrimination laws so that our economy benefits from the experience and wisdom of older workers.

We must end requirements that job applicants write their high school graduation dates or other age-identifiers on application forms. Right now, it is illegal to ask someone their age, but not their high school graduation date.

And also, ensure that the penalties for age discrimination are commensurate with those for other forms of discrimination. Currently in Colorado, compensatory and punitive damages are allowed in race and gender discrimination cases, but not for age.

Make clear that Colorado’s age discrimination laws apply to hiring, and that the burden of providing age discrimination is not higher than for other forms of discrimination.

Some problems seem overwhelming and too big to solve, but this is one we can address. Certainly, we can’t legislate away ageism, but we can give older workers the same protections afforded to other groups — and we can help businesses get and keep the workers they need.

Janine Vanderburg directs Changing the Narrative, a Colorado-based campaign to change the way people think, talk and act about aging and ageism. The end game? To end ageism. You can read more about what they are doing to reduce workplace ageism.

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit online or check out our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

google news
Continue Reading

Trending