Connect with us

News

Dazzle Jazz almost closed during the pandemic. Now it’s celebrating its 25th anniversary.

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Dazzle Jazz Almost Closed During The Pandemic. Now It’s Celebrating Its 25Th Anniversary.
google news

The pandemic has beaten so many artists and clubs into the ground that it’s tempting to think of it as the sort of highly pressurized environment that produces diamond-hard resolve.

That only happens if there’s enough support on all sides.

“In a weird way, it’s been good. It’s taught us to do what we do best, and push all that other stuff to the side,” said Donald Rossa, 62, the longtime owner of Dazzle, Denver’s flagship jazz club that’s celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2022.

Rossa is gracious in his assessment of the past couple of years, which have been as rough for Dazzle as for any other independent music venue. A lack of revenue, potentially crushing refund requests, furloughed employees and more could have swiftly driven the club into the ground early on.

But as one of the region’s most important jazz players, Dazzle has felt the community love since COVID-19 froze the music industry in its tracks in early 2020, with tens of thousands of dollars in donations and grants, in addition to volunteer work.

Not that it was easy, or automatic. The club has faced months-long stage blackouts, even as it continued to pay musicians for virtual concerts (a rarity over the last two years). It raised $40,000 for employees through GoFundMe, Westword reported, despite a near-total lack of cashflow during the shutdowns. And the club has provided for Denver musicians of all genres with its free-food program, which stocked an honest-to-God pantry with canned and dry goods, and fresh vegetables.

“We all started talking when the shows first stopped,” Rossa said of his peers in the Front Range jazz scene. “And it enraged us that they were cutting off a lifeline to these musicians. It was a bunch of bull(crap), so what were we going to do to fight for them?”

Music fans enjoy the Roberta Gambarini Quintet as it performs on Friday, Jan. 7, in Dazzle’s 9,000-square-foot showroom. The club has a full slate of shows scheduled for the next three months. (Photo by Daniel Brenner/Special to the Denver Post)

The pantry eventually was retired in favor of paying his musicians more, Rossa said. But that spirit continues to go both ways: Dazzle is now raising money for a different nonprofit each month by adding the option to donate through its ticketing system. (In January, the club is supporting the James Dewitt Yancey Foundation.)

“I was in awe of the whole place, and the scene,” said general manager and co-owner Matt Ruff, who joined Dazzle immediately after moving here from El Paso, Texas, in 2003. That was back when the club was a railroad car-shaped bar with an adjacent, upscale dinner stage, located at 930 Lincoln St.

“I had a really great (job) interview with Donald, and he invited me back that evening to see Future Jazz Project and Andrew Hudson’s Latin jazz band,” Ruff said. “I thought I was interviewing for a bartender or server position, but I came in as GM that first holiday season.”

Like Ruff, others found their way to Rossa thanks to the club’s reputation for booking freshly minted local acts as much as Grammy-winning touring artists. That includes the upcoming Christian McBride and Inside Straight shows (scheduled for May 10-12), hip trios such as The Bad Plus (a perennial Denver and Dazzle favorite), and boundary-pushing locals such as Los Mochochetes.

As a result, Dazzle has been consistently named the city’s best jazz club in critics’ and reader polls, and proven its mettle in roundups such as Downbeat’s “100 Best Jazz Clubs in the World.”

1642425200 839 Dazzle Jazz Almost Closed During The Pandemic Now Its Celebrating

Daniel Brenner, Special to the Denver Post

DENVER, COLORADO – JANUARY 7: Paul Romaine, drums, part of the Roberta Gambarini Quintet performs Friday, Jan. 7, 2022 at Dazzle. The Jazz club celebrates its 25th anniversary this year and recently moved to a new location on Curtis Street. (Photo by Daniel Brenner/Special to the Denver Post)

“The only thing I’ve said is, ‘We’ve got to make money to stay open for this next year,’ ” Rossa said. “And if we do that, we got another year. But the beauty of this business is that we’re all ages, and that jazz can be defined in a lot of ways.”

Denver’s jazz scene is compact but strong, and Rossa and his team are arguably the core of it. With the help of the nationally acclaimed KUVO Jazz station (89.3 FM) and other names such as the Live @ Jack’s production company (formerly Jazz @ Jack’s venue), Nocturne, The Mercury Cafe, Soiled Dove, Muse Performance Space, and the late, great El Chapultepec in Lower Downtown — among many other boosters — Dazzle has become a safe stop for top talent.

That’s also thanks to a long line of savvy bookers, Rossa said, thanking too many of them to list here, and the bar’s co-founders, Karen Storck and Miles Snyder (from whom Rossa bought Dazzle in 2003). Now located in a lofty, 9,000-square-foot space in the Baur’s building at 1512 Curtis St., Dazzle has continued to evolve — particularly after it decamped there from Lincoln Street in 2017, following potential renovation issues that would have pulled it under at Lincoln Streeet.

That’s when seasoned jazz singer Jan Cleveland joined the team.

“People like myself and Austin Andres came on board (as co-owners) with the hope that we could give Donald some energy to keep going,” said Cleveland, who’s also an attorney who has overseen Dazzle’s legal affairs since 2017.

“Jan and I were talking about opening a jazz club on our own, and then talking to Donald about maybe purchasing Dazzle at some point,” said Andres, who pitches in with talent buying and booking. “But Donald was really invested and invited us to partner with him.”

google news

News

Oscar-winning ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ star Louise Fletcher dies at 88

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Oscar-Winning 'Cuckoo'S Nest' Star Louise Fletcher Dies At 88
google news

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Louise Fletcher, a belated star whose gripping performance as the cruel, calculating nurse Ratched in “Flight Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” set a new standard for on-screen villains and won her an Oscar, died at 88.

Fletcher died in her sleep surrounded by her family at her home in Montdurausse, France, her agent David Shaul told The Associated Press on Friday. No cause was given.

After putting her career on hold for years to raise her children, Fletcher was in her early 40s and little known when she was cast opposite Jack Nicholson in the 1975 film by director Milos Forman, who had admired her work the previous year in director Robert Altman’s “Thieves Like Us.” At the time, she was unaware that many other top stars, including Anne Bancroft, Ellen Burstyn and Angela Lansbury, had turned it down.

“I was the last person cast,” she recalled in a 2004 interview. “It wasn’t until halfway through filming that I realized the role had been offered to other actresses who didn’t want to appear so horrible on screen.”

‘Flight Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ became the first film since 1934’s ‘It Happened One Night’ to win Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay .

American actress Louise Fletcher as Nurse Ratched in ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’, directed by Milos Forman, 1975. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

Clutching his Oscar at the 1976 ceremony, Fletcher told the audience, “Looks like you all hate me.”

She then addressed her deaf parents in Birmingham, Alabama, speaking and using sign language: “I want to thank you for teaching me to dream. You see my dream come true.

A minute of silence was followed by thunderous applause.

Later that night, Forman made the wry comment to Fletcher and his co-star, Jack Nicholson, “Now we’re all going to have huge flops.”

In the short term, at least, he was right.

Forman then directed “Hair,” the film version of the hit Broadway musical that failed to capture the appeal of the stage version. Nicholson directed and starred in “Goin’ South,” widely regarded as one of his worst films. Fletcher signed on for “Exorcist II: The Heretic,” an ill-conceived sequel to the historic original.

Far more than her male peers, Fletcher was hampered by her age from finding major roles in Hollywood. Yet she worked continuously for most of the rest of her life. His post-“Cuckoo’s Nest” movies included “Mama Dracula,” “Dead Kids,” and “The Boy Who Could Fly.”

She was nominated for Emmys for her guest roles on the television series “Joan of Arcadia” and “Picket Fences,” and had a recurring role as Bajoran religious leader Kai Winn Adami on “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. “. She played the mother of musical duo Carpenters in “The Karen Carpenter Story” in 1989.

Oscar-Winning 'Cuckoo's Nest' Star Louise Fletcher Dies At 88

THE 48TH ANNUAL ACADEMY AWARDS – Show cover – Air date: March 29, 1976. (Photo by ABC Photo Archives/Disney General Entertainment Content via Getty Images)

Fletcher’s career was also hampered by his height. At 5ft 10in, she was often fired from an audition immediately because she was taller than her leading man.

Fletcher had moved to Los Angeles to launch her acting career shortly after graduating from North Carolina State University.

Working as a doctor’s receptionist by day and studying by night with famed actor and teacher Jeff Corey, she began getting day jobs on such TV shows as “Wagon Train,” “77 Sunset Strip,” and ” The Untouchables”.

Fletcher married producer Jerry Bick in the early 1960s and gave birth to two sons in quick succession. She decided to put her career on hold to become a stay-at-home mom and did not work for 11 years.

“I made the choice to quit working, but I didn’t see it as a choice,” she said during the 2004 interview. home.”

She divorced Bick in 1977 and he died in 2004.

In “Cuckoo’s Nest,” based on the novel Ken Kesey wrote while on an experimental LSD program, Nicholson’s character, RP McMurphy, is a swaggering petty criminal who feigns insanity to be transferred from prison. to a mental institution where he won’t have to work so hard.

Once institutionalized, McMurphy finds that his psychiatric ward is run by Fletcher’s towering and cold nurse, Mildred Ratched, who keeps her patients under her control. As the two face off, McMurphy virtually takes over the room with her bravado, resulting in severe punishment from Ratched and the institution, where she restores order.

The character was so memorable that she would become the basis for a Netflix series, “Ratched,” 45 years later.

Estelle Louise Fletcher was born the second of four children on July 22, 1934 in Birmingham. His mother was born deaf and his father was a traveling Episcopal minister who lost his hearing when he was struck by lightning when he was 4 years old.

“It was like having immigrant parents who don’t speak your language,” she said in 1982.

The Fletcher children were helped by their aunt, with whom they lived in Bryant, Texas, for a year. She taught them to read, write and speak, as well as to sing and dance.

It was these latest studies that convinced Fletcher she wanted to act. She was even more inspired, she once said, when she saw the movie “Lady in the Dark” starring Ginger Rogers.

This film and others, Fletcher said, taught him “your dream could come true if you wanted it enough”.

“I knew from the movies,” she said, “that I wouldn’t have to stay in Birmingham and be like everyone else.”

Fletcher’s death was first reported by Deadline.

She is survived by her two sons, John and Andrew Bick.

___

The late AP Entertainment Writer Bob Thomas provided biographical material for this report.

Breitbart News

google news
Continue Reading

News

Russia bombs Ukrainian towns amid Kremlin-organized votes – The Denver Post

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Russia Bombs Ukrainian Towns Amid Kremlin-Organized Votes – The Denver Post
google news

By KARL RITTER and HANNA ARHIROVA

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian forces launched new strikes on Ukrainian cities on Saturday as Kremlin-orchestrated votes were held in occupied areas to create a pretext for their annexation by Moscow, while hundreds of people were arrested in Russia for trying to protest a mobilization order that commits more troops to the fight in Ukraine.

Ukraine’s presidential office said the latest Russian bombardment killed at least three people and injured 19. Oleksandr Starukh, the Ukrainian governor of Zaporizhzhia, one of the regions where Moscow-based officials have held referendums on the accession to Russia, said a Russian missile hit a building in the city of Zaporizhzhia, killing one person and injuring seven others.

Ukraine and its Western allies claim that the ongoing referendums in Kherson and Zaporizhzhia in the south and in the eastern regions of Lugansk and Donetsk have no legal value. They alleged the votes were an illegitimate attempt by Moscow to seize Ukrainian territory stretching from the Russian border to the Crimean Peninsula.

Luhansk Governor Serhiy Haidai said the vote “was more like an opinion poll under the guns”, adding that Moscow-backed local authorities had sent armed escorts to accompany election officials and take down the names of the candidates. people who had voted against joining Russia.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has urged Ukrainians in occupied regions to undermine the referendums and share information about who is carrying out “this farce”. He also called on Russian recruits to sabotage and desert the army if called up as part of the partial troop mobilization announced by President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday.

“If you enter the Russian army, sabotage any enemy activity, obstruct any Russian operation, provide us with any important information about the occupiers – their bases, their headquarters, their ammunition warehouses,” Zelenskyy said.

Putin on Saturday signed a hastily approved bill that toughens the penalty for soldiers who disobey officers’ orders, desert or surrender to the enemy.

To carry out the referendums which began on Friday, election officials accompanied by police carried ballots to homes and set up mobile polling stations, citing security concerns. Voting is due to end on Tuesday. Donetsk Governor Pavlo Kyrylenko said

“Half the population fled from the Donetsk region because of Russian terror and constant shelling, voting against Russia with their feet, and the second half were deceived and scared”, .

In the Ukrainian capital, around 100 people from the Russian-occupied city of Mariupol, which is part of the Donetsk region, gathered to protest against the referendum, covering themselves with Ukrainian flags and carrying posters reading “Mariupol, c is Ukraine”.

“They destroyed the city, killed thousands of people, and now they are doing some kind of desecration there,” said Vladyslav Kildishov, who helped organize the rally.

Elina Sytkova, 21, a protester who still has many relatives in Mariupol even though the city has spent months under bombardment, said the vote was ‘an illusion of choice when there is none’ .

It’s ‘like a joke, because it’s the same as in Crimea, that is, it’s fake and not real,’ she said, referring to a referendum of 2014 that took place in Crimea before Moscow annexed the peninsula in a move that most of the world considered illegal.

The mobilization ordered by Putin marked a dramatic departure from his efforts to portray the seven-month war as a “special military operation” that does not interfere with the lives of most Russians.

Russian police moved quickly to break up anti-mobilization protests held in several cities across Russia on Saturday, arresting around 500 people. More than 1,300 protesters were arrested in a previous wave of demonstrations on Wednesday, and many of them immediately received summonses.

Russian leader and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said the order applied to reservists who had recently served or had special skills, but almost all men are considered reservists until age 65 and the Putin’s decree left the door open for a broader appeal.

The Russian ministry said the partial mobilization was initially aimed at adding around 300,000 troops to bolster its outnumbered volunteer forces in Ukraine. The Ukrainian government stopped allowing most men between the ages of 18 and 60 to leave the country immediately after the February 24 Russian invasion under a general mobilization order to build up an army of one million. ‘men.

Across Russia’s 11 time zones, men hugged weeping family members before being gathered for service, fearing a wider call would follow. Some media claimed that the Russian authorities planned to mobilize more than a million recruits, which the Kremlin denied.

To allay public fears the appeal could erode Putin’s grip on power, authorities announced that many Russians working in high tech, communications or finance would be exempt.

After some of the pilots of Russian airline Aeroflot and other airlines reportedly received appeal notices, the pilots and traffic controllers unions moved quickly to secure the government’s promise that they too would be excluded of mobilization.

Many Russian men bought scarce and exorbitantly priced plane tickets out of the country amid rumors of an impending border closure. Thousands more fled by car, creating lines of traffic for hours or even days at some borders. The mass exodus underscored the unpopularity of the war and fueled public outrage.

In a sign that the Kremlin was beginning to worry about a backlash, the head of a major state-controlled television station harshly criticized military authorities for hastily sweeping up random people to achieve targets mobilization instead of calling in people with specific skills and recent military service, as Putin had promised.

RT chief Margarita Simonyan slammed military conscription offices for “driving people crazy” by rounding up those who weren’t supposed to be conscripted. “It’s as if they were instructed by Kyiv to do this,” she said.

Ramzan Kadyrov, the Kremlin-backed Chechnya regional leader who has sent his forces to fight in Ukraine and has repeatedly called for tougher action, has suggested that Moscow should engage law enforcement personnel more extensively in the fights.

He denounced those fleeing the mobilization as cowards and argued that the police and various paramilitary agencies which altogether number 5 million along with the military would be a far better trained and motivated fighting force.

“If we let 50% of the personnel do their jobs, another 2.5 million will blow up any Western army and we won’t need reservists,” Kadyrov said.

Putin’s mobilization order followed a swift Ukrainian counteroffensive that forced Moscow to withdraw from large swathes of the northeast Kharkiv region, a humiliating defeat that exposed flaws in military planning from Moscow.

The Ministry of Defense announced on Saturday the dismissal of General Dmitry Bulgakov from the post of Deputy Minister of Defense in charge of logistics. He did not mention the cause of his ousting, but the move was widely seen as punishment for failures to support operations in Ukraine.

___

Follow AP coverage of the war at

denverpost

google news
Continue Reading

News

Dave Hyde: It’s Dolphins versus Bills after years, even decades, in the waiting

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Dave Hyde: It’s Dolphins Versus Bills After Years, Even Decades, In The Waiting
google news

Pull up a chair and sit on the edge of it, folks. This one could be worth the wait — and, thanks to everyone from Cam Cameron to Steve Ross, it’s been quite a wait.

The Miami Dolphins play the Buffalo Bills on Sunday in either the biggest game of the NFL weekend or the biggest game at Hard Rock Stadium since it was called Dolphin Stadium three name changes ago.

Take your pick for how big this game is. And round up the kids while you’re deciding. It’s time this next generation knew. This is what Dolphins weekend once were always about, if you can remember back to yesteryear when Dan Marino was a player and not a consultant or the 1970s was an era and not a sit-com.

Big games. Big rivals. Big hoo-hahs. Big consequences, too.

The horse is admittedly ahead of the cart of consequence. It’s just Game 3 in, as linebacker Jerome Baker says, “a marathon of a season” — though the marathon is a sprint if you’ve watched the Dolphins run.

But there’s been a generational void of consequence involving the Dolphins. And these Dolphins want in. They don’t want to be the next edition with their nose pressed against the glass. One of first-year coach Mike McDaniel’s pet phrases to his players is, “We know we’re going to be special,” and that can fit a timeline of this Sunday or next season.

“It’s something we’re believing,” defensive tackle John Jenkins says. “You can see it coming together.”

Winning is the magnet in that regard, not just bringing the locker room together but fans willing to believe again, too. A 2-0 start with a ho-hummer against rival New England and an epic comeback at Baltimore have changed some minds.

Now comes Buffalo and no season will be conclusively made or broken Sunday. So what? You’re allowed some overhype considering you have to go back to Jan. 4, 2009 against Baltimore since the Dolphins played as big a home game. That was a playoff game, too (and it wasn’t pretty).

For a regular-season home game of this intrigue, you have to shuffle through history to … Jimmy Johnson’s 1999 Dolphins going 7-1 in November after beating Tennessee … Shula’s 1993 Dolphins entered 9-2 against the New York Giants in December?

The point is, forgive the overhype, but there’s a lot of unused hype for a couple of decades. Something will be learned about the Dolphins, and the obvious question is whether the Dolphins have closed the continental stretch of distance between them and the Super-Bowl-trending Bills.

Las Vegas doesn’t think so. You can see why. Buffalo came within 13 mismanaged seconds of a second-straight AFC Championship Game last season. It began this season beating the defending Super Bowl champ Los Angeles Rams and No. 1 AFC seed Tennessee by a combined score of 72-17.

That’s one reason why Buffalo is a whopping six-point favorite even in the September heat of South Florida. The other reason is they’ve beaten the Dolphins seven straight times. It’s not been close, either, with an average margin of 16.3 points. Only two games have been in single digits.

That underscores a larger point here. If Buffalo is playing with Vegas’ money, the Dolphins are playing with house money. This is a rare instance where a win says more about them than a loss. A win says they’re ready to contend in a manner they haven’t in decades.

And a loss? It says they have work to do. The issue would be how much.

“It’s a big game,” Baker says, “because it’s the next game. It’s the only one we’re looking at. But at the same time we know there’s a long way to go.”

The Dolphins have spent three years of a perplexing rebuild getting to an important game again. Or they’ve spent 14 years wandering the wilderness getting to a home game like it. Either way, pull up a seat Sunday and let’s hope you’re on the edge of it.

()

google news
Continue Reading

News

Literary pick: Carol Dines’ new YA novel explores teen girl friendship

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Carol Dines Portrait
google news

Teenage girls’ lives are filled with drama, especially when it comes to friends who may or may not be good for a young woman trying to figure out who she is and with whom she should share her most intimate secrets. And if the friendship goes wrong, the emotional toll can be devastating.

That’s the conflict Carol Dines explores in her involving and beautifully-written new young adult novel, “The Take-Over Friend.”

Carol Dines (Courtesy of Fitzroy Books)

Dines, who lives in Minneapolis with her husband, Jack Zipes (the fairy tale expert), says she was inspired to write this book after supporting her own daughter through a devastating friendship breakup, which made her recall her own experiences with her best friend when she was growing up.

Francis is a shy, introverted girl whose best friend just moved away, but she finds a new friend in Sonja, who has been in school in France. Sonja is witty, worldly and outgoing and seems eager to get close to Francis when they meet on the first day of their freshman year of high school.

Soon the girls are inseparable and they share secrets about their families. Sonja’s parents are in the middle of a bitter divorce and Frances’ father suffers from bipolar disorder. Dines’ depiction of this man’s suffering, and his wife’s no-nonsense demand he take his meds, is as interesting as his daughter’s story.

Francis has second thoughts about her admiration for Sonja when her friend starts insinuating herself into Francis’ family. A frequent sleep-over guest, Sonja boldly works her way into traditions Francis cherishes, such as making pies with her older sister and mother on Thanksgiving morning. Francis also realizes Sonja is using her to get close to her older brother, Will, who is totally into sports. And Sonja spends long afternoons with Francis’ dad, which makes her mom very uneasy.

Both girls are impacted. Francis resents lonely Sonja for trying to become part of the family and ignoring boundaries. Sonja feels betrayed when Francis can’t understand her need for a loving home.

When there is a violent act of cruelty, the friendship is over.

“The Take-Over Friend” will be understood by girls (and maybe some boys) and their mothers, who try to support their teens as they deal with new experiences in their relationships. The story is involving, with both characters so clearly drawn the reader feels she knows them, or was one of them at one time. Francis, though, is more likable than Sonja, but Sonja is the most needy underneath her grown-up veneer. It’s clear who is the take-over friend.

Dines, born in Rochester, Minn., is the author of two previous novels and a short story collection for teens

She will celebrate the publication of ‘The Take-Over Friend” (Fitzroy Books, $16.95 paperback)  at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, in conversation with Minnesota author Patricia Cumbie at Magers & Quinn, 3038 Hennepin Ave. S., Mpls., and at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 12, in conversation with Gary Eldon Peter, moderated by Judith Katz, at the Red Balloon, 891 Grand Ave., St. Paul.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Pope Francis, 85, uses a wheelchair to tell young people they must help save the Earth

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

The Pope Was Once Again Seen Being Pushed Around In A Wheelchair During A Trip To Assisi In Central Italy
google news

Pope Francis, 85, was seen pushed in a wheelchair on Saturday as he traveled to Assisi to tell young people it was their duty to protect the planet and change the course of the Earth.

Francis was visiting his namesake saint’s birthplace which was close to nature when he called for ‘courage’ to give up fossil fuels and lamented that older generations don’t know how to protect the planet and ensure peace .

He told the young people that he pinned his hopes on their efforts to save the planet and make the global economy more pro-poor.

The health of the aging pope has been in the spotlight for some time as worried onlookers wonder if he still has the vitality to maintain his duties as pontiff.

He is believed to use a wheelchair due to a serious knee problem which limits his mobility, although it was also reported that he underwent colon surgery in July to remove 33cm (13 inches) of intestine.

The Vatican described it as a “planned procedure” because the pope’s innards had “shrunk”.

The Pope Was Once Again Seen Being Pushed Around In A Wheelchair During A Trip To Assisi In Central Italy

The pope was once again seen being pushed around in a wheelchair during a trip to Assisi in central Italy

Francis, 85, Is Believed To Be Using A Wheelchair Due To A Serious Knee Problem Which Limits His Mobility, Although It Was Also Reported That He Underwent Colon Surgery In July To Remove 33Cm Of 'Intestine.

Francis, 85, Is Believed To Be Using A Wheelchair Due To A Serious Knee Problem Which Limits His Mobility, Although It Was Also Reported That He Underwent Colon Surgery In July To Remove 33Cm Of 'Intestine.

Francis, 85, is believed to be using a wheelchair due to a serious knee problem which limits his mobility, although it was also reported that he underwent colon surgery in July to remove 33cm of ‘intestine.

Francis Was Visiting The Birthplace Of His Namesake Saint Who Was Close To Nature When He Called For

Francis Was Visiting The Birthplace Of His Namesake Saint Who Was Close To Nature When He Called For

Francis was visiting his namesake saint’s birthplace which was close to nature when he called for ‘courage’ to give up fossil fuels and lamented that older generations don’t know how to protect the planet and ensure peace

And in August, Francis created the post of Personal Health Assistant to the Holy Father to complement the personal doctor he already has. Italian Massimiliano Strappetti has been appointed to the post, the Holy See announced the same month.

On his July trip to Canada – where the pontiff apologized for the role of the Catholic Church in removing Indigenous children from their families and placing them with Canadian families – he was accompanied by a nurse in all time.

During his brief visit to the hill town in central Italy on Saturday, Francis addressed a gathering of some 1,000 young people, including some young economists. Others are involved in efforts, including start-ups, focused on helping the environment.

Participants came from all over the world. Among them was a woman who told the pope how she and her husband were helped to flee Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover last year by an organization called The Economy of Francis, which is inspired by the life of Saint Francis, with his attention to the poor and other needy.

The pope said there needs to be a global economy that expresses “a new vision for the environment and the Earth”.

“There are many people, companies and institutions that are making an ecological conversion. We need to move forward on this path and do more,” Francis said.

The pontiff cited an urgent need to discuss development models.

Pope Francis Attends The Economy Of Francesco (Eof) Event In Assisi, Central Italy, Where He Told Young People He Pinned His Hopes On Their Efforts To Save The Planet And Make The Economy Global More Attentive To The Poor

Pope Francis Attends The Economy Of Francesco (Eof) Event In Assisi, Central Italy, Where He Told Young People He Pinned His Hopes On Their Efforts To Save The Planet And Make The Economy Global More Attentive To The Poor

Pope Francis attends the Economy of Francesco (EoF) event in Assisi, central Italy, where he told young people he pinned his hopes on their efforts to save the planet and make the economy global more attentive to the poor

Francis Smiles For A Selfie With A Participant During Francesco's Economy (Eof)

Francis Smiles For A Selfie With A Participant During Francesco's Economy (Eof)

Francis smiles for a selfie with a participant during Francesco’s Economy (EoF)

“Now is the time to show new courage in moving away from fossil fuels to accelerate the development of zero- or positive-impact energy sources,” Francis said.

He told the young people: “Our generation has left you a rich legacy, but we have failed to protect the planet and we are not ensuring peace.

He lamented a lack of “creativity, optimism, enthusiasm” and told the young people that “we are grateful to God that you are here”. Not only will you be here tomorrow, but you are here today.

The pope’s faith in young people could be bolstered by the horrors he admitted to being perpetrated in Ukraine, revealing that his charity leader who brings aid to Ukraine had to run to safety after coming under fire. gunshots last week.

Cardinal Konrad Krajewski, who is Polish, was forced to dodge bullets on his fourth humanitarian and pastoral mission to Ukraine, sending supplies along with a Catholic bishop, a Protestant bishop and a Ukrainian soldier.

The pope said he spoke yesterday with Krajewski, who had visited Ukrainian mass graves outside Izium in northeastern Ukraine.

Francis said today: “He (Krajewski) told me about the pain of these people, the savage acts, the monstrosity, the tortured bodies that they find.

“Let us unite with this noble and martyred people.

dailymail us

google news
Continue Reading

News

Bill Madden: Aaron Judge, Albert Pujols giving fans something to cheer for even as MLB strikes out

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Bill Madden: Aaron Judge, Albert Pujols Giving Fans Something To Cheer For Even As Mlb Strikes Out
google news

Years ago, a wise person once said: “Baseball is the greatest game of all in spite of the people who run it.”

This has never been truer than this weekend when, despite Rob Manfred’s Apple streaming MLB greed grab that deprived most of the country from TV viewership Friday night, Aaron Judge and Albert Pujols calmly went about their business of cleansing baseball’s soul from the steroids plague which previous commissioner Bud Selig took too long to get a handle on.

Suddenly, and somewhat unexpectedly, baseball has found itself with a season of celebration of not one but two “clean” sluggers closing in on home run milestones — Judge breaking Roger Maris’ 61-year-old American League record of 61 homers and Pujols becoming only the fourth player in history with 700 career homers.

And wouldn’t you know, Pujols hit his two homers Friday night to join the exclusive club in the Cardinals’ game that was also exclusively Apple-streamed — so hardly anyone witnessed it unless you were in the ballpark. Shame on baseball.

While Pujols’ feat will be his last hurrah as he heads into retirement, Judge is potentially looking at becoming the highest paid position player in the game after not only breaking Maris’ record but putting together one of the greatest seasons in baseball history. Going into the weekend, he led the AL in batting and the majors in homers, RBI, runs, OBP, slugging, OPS and total bases. His 60 homers being 20 more than runner-up Kyle Schwarber of the Phillies.

Putting that in perspective with some of the other greatest seasons since World War II:

In Frank Robinson’s 1966 AL MVP year for the Orioles, he won the Triple Crown (.316/49 HR/122 RBI) and also led the league in runs (122), OBP (.410), slugging (.637) and OPS (1.047). But Mickey Mantle’s 1956 Triple Crown MVP year was even better as he led the majors in batting (.353), homers (52), RBI (130), runs (132), slugging (.705), OPS (1.169) and total bases (376). In 1949, Ted Williams won his second AL MVP award with a monster season in which he hit .343 and led the AL in homers (43), RBI (159), runs (150), OBP (.490), slugging (.650), OPS (1.141) and total bases (368).

There is no question Judge’s historical season in which he bet on himself has earned him a substantial increase from the seven-year/$213.5 million ($30.5M AAV) he turned down from the Yankees back in April. The question is how substantial? Judge, in so many words, told the Yankees he felt he should be paid commensurate to Mike Trout’s major league high $35.54 million AAV for position players. At this point, that’s probably not going to be a problem for the Yankees, so the battle is going to come down to the number of years.

For it doesn’t matter how many homers Judge winds up hitting, he will still be a 31-year-old player next year and, as the Yankees (and all the other clubs as well) are fully aware of, contracts of eight or more years to players 31 or older are doomed to ill fortune — the two classic examples being Miguel Cabrera’s eight-year/$248 million signed with the Tigers in 2016 and Pujols’ $10-year/$240 million with the Angels in 2011.

Cabrera, who never again hit over .300 or drove in more than 75 runs after 2016, is staggering to the finish line. Pujols, a .328 lifetime hitter when he defected from the Cardinals to Angels in 2012, never again hit .300, his career average having fallen to .296, and had only three 100-RBI seasons in his nine years with the Angels.

More than likely, given the analytic philosophy throughout baseball about long-term contracts to players in their 30s, the Yankees will be bidding against themselves for Judge. The teams that can afford to go toe-to-toe with them either have expensive free agents of their own they need to re-sign (Dodgers and Trea Turner, Red Sox and Xander Bogaerts) or, in the case of the Giants and Cubs, have too many other holes to fill than to tie up $37 million of payroll on one player in his 30s.

My guess is the Yankees re-sign Judge for somewhere between $260-$300 million, depending on the years — while resigned to the fact it will very likely wind up being the worst contract they ever gave a player.

IT’S A MADD, MADD WORLD

The Royals firing of President of Baseball Operations Dayton Moore, one of the most respected execs in the industry, sent shockwaves through the game last week, especially when combined with owner John Sherman’s decision to replace him with his top assistant and longtime ally GM J.J. Picollo. As one longtime scout and friend to both of them told me Thursday: “I don’t really understand this. Dayton hired J.J. They both came from the Braves. They’re both the same guy. J.J. was probably even more involved in all the hirings, etc., in player development than Dayton.”

But Sherman, who bought the Royals in 2019, four years after they won the World Series under Moore’s direction, has seen nothing but losing teams — they’re closing in on their third 100-loss season in the last five years — and, as he said Wednesday, he was expecting them to at least be around .500 this season.

According to sources within the Royals, Sherman was frustrated by Moore’s lack of aggressiveness in making moves to improve the team. He was also said to be not all that enthralled with manager Mike Matheny, who Moore hired in 2019 after he’d been found wanting by the cross-state Cardinals after seven years in St. Louis. It’s a given that one of Picollo’s first moves will be to hire a new manager. Perhaps the biggest criticism of Moore was the Royals’ inability to develop quality starting pitchers. Since 2015, they’ve drafted eight starting pitchers in the first round and so far only one of them, Brady Singer, has lived up to that No. 1 promise. …

As much as the Royals’ may have disappointed Sherman, no team in the AL Central underperformed more this year than the overwhelming division favorite White Sox, who completed their implosion last week by getting swept by the Guardians, to fall seven games off the pace, under interim manager Miguel Cairo (so it wasn’t all Tony La Russa’s fault as many in the Chicago media corps have maintained.) Now the question is will White Sox board chairman Jerry Reinsdorf, who fielded the highest payroll in his 40-year tenure as owner this year, likewise shakes up his own front office. But there is no more loyal owner in baseball than Reinsdorf — some would say loyal to a fault — and if longtime president of baseball operations Kenny Williams and GM Rick Hahn are safe, then a major roster re-shuffling is definitely in order, starting with catcher/DH Yasmani Grandal and utilityman Leury Garcia, who this year may have been the two worst players in baseball with the two lowest total base counts of any regulars (minimum 300 plate appearances) in the game. Grandal, who’s always been a below average catcher, is the second player in history with 300-plus plate appearances to score less than 15 runs (as of Friday) and strike out over 60 times, while Garcia’s .500 OPS is the lowest ever by a White Sox player with 300-plus plate appearances. And then there’s Luis Robert, the one-time wunderkind White Sox center fielder who just a year ago was being hailed as a future Willie Mays, but who’s been marked absent both literally (constant minor injuries that keep him out of the lineup) and figuratively (the only player in the American League with 65-plus at-bats in the second half with two or fewer RBI, and no home runs since the All-Star break.)

()

google news
Continue Reading

Trending