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On MLK Day, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says US economy is unfair to Black people

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Atlanta church service will celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.

ATLANTA (AP) — The U.S. economy “has never worked fairly for Black Americans — or, really, for any American of color,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in a speech delivered Monday, one of many by national leaders acknowledging unmet needs for racial equality on Martin Luther King Day.

Major events for the holiday also included the annual Martin Luther King Jr. service at the slain civil rights leader’s Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, whose senior pastor, U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock, was hosting Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and other politicians.

Monday would have been the 93rd birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who was just 39 when he was assassinated in 1968 while helping sanitation workers strike for better pay and workplace safety in Memphis, Tennessee.

King, who delivered his historic “I Have a Dream” speech while leading the 1963 March on Washington and was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, remains one of the world’s most beloved figures. He considered racial equality inseparable from alleviating poverty and stopping war. His insistence on nonviolent protest continues to influence activists pushing for civil rights and social change.

Yellen referred to King’s famous speech in remarks she recorded for delivery at the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network breakfast in Washington, noting the financial metaphor he used when describing the founding fathers’ promises of equality.

King said on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that “America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned.” He called it ”a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds. But we refuse to believe the bank of justice is bankrupt!”

“It is compelling rhetoric, but I also think Dr. King knew it was a more than a metaphor. He knew that economic injustice was bound up in the larger injustice he fought against. From Reconstruction, to Jim Crow, to the present day, our economy has never worked fairly for Black Americans – or, really, for any American of color,” Yellen said.

She said the administration of President Joe Biden has sought to ensure that no economic institution fails to work for people of color. Equity was built into the American Rescue Plan so that communities of color would get pandemic relief, and Treasury is injecting $9 billion into Community Development Financial Institutions and Minority Depository Institutions traditionally poorly served by the financial sector.

“There is still much more work Treasury needs to do to narrow the racial wealth divide,” she said.

The King Center said the 10 a.m. service, featuring a keynote by the Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church, would be broadcast live on Atlanta’s Fox TV affiliate and on Facebook, YouTube and thekingcenter.org. Atlanta’s planned events also included a march, a rally and a voter registration drive by the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda and Youth Service America.

“On this King Holiday, I call us up to shift our priorities to reflect a commitment to true peace and an awareness of our interconnectedness, interdependence, and interrelatedness,” King Center CEO Bernice King said in a statement. “This will lead us to a greater understanding of our responsibilities to and for each other, which is crucial for learning to live together, achieving ‘true peace,’ and creating the Beloved Community.”

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So You Think You Can Dance: Season 17 – When And Where To Watch It?

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So You Think You Can Dance: Season 17 – When And Where To Watch It?

There are other dance competition reality shows in America. Still, SYTYCD has been on a completely different level. It has been nominated for the Emmys award 68 times, winning 17 of them, including the Outstanding Lighting Design, Outstanding Choreography, and Amazing Costumes.

Each season offers a lot of dancers to prove their worth and step into the stardom of the dancer community all around the world. The Contestants will have to be versatile and diverse to get through the auditions, stay put to the show, and be one of them can be America’s best dancers. The last time it was aired was in 2019 for the 16th season, with Bailey Munoz as the winner.

What Happened Earlier?

So You Think You Can Dance is an American dance competition reality show. It was originally planned to be premiered in the summer of 2020, which was to be judged by series creator Nigel Lythgoe (on would be his 17th consecutive season as the judge), Mary Murphy, and Laurieann Gibson. But due to COVID-19, it was postponed.

Now, the roles for the judging panel have been completely changed and will be formed by Stephen “tWitch” Boss(a freestyle hip-hop dancer and season 4 runner-up of the same show), JoJo Siwa (he will be new to the judging panel, and he is a reality TV star), and Matthew Morrison(he will be the second and third judge during the auditions and live shows). They are to replace the previous judges.

1652905627 333 So You Think You Can Dance Season 17 – When

Auditions

The auditions will be starting from March 2022 as it was postponed amid the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The eligibility for the auditions is just that the participants must be from 18 to 30 years of age. It will continue its auditions from where it was discontinued due to COVID-19.

Those originally registered in 2020 could be getting an extended age limit to 32. Production was rescheduled for March 2022, with the auditions to be held at the start.

When And Where To Watch

After a long wait for the most beloved show in America, it is finally making its comeback. The first episode will be aired on FOX on Wednesday, May 18, 2022, at 9 pm ET/PT. It will also be available on several other platforms on-demand like fuboTV, FOX Now, Hulu, and On Demand, and there are other options too.

The first episode will be aired on May 18, 2022, and the following episode will follow after six days, one at a time.

Season 17 of So You Think You Can Dance will be hosted by presenter Cat Deeley, who has been hosting every season since season 2 in 2006, after replacing Lauren Sanchez for the same role.

The Contestants will be highly skilled in various dancing styles like contemporary, hip-hop, breakdancing, tap, classical, etc. They will have to prove themselves as the best of the best to be the winner of this season and will be crowned as ‘America’s favorite dancer.’

The post So You Think You Can Dance: Season 17 – When And Where To Watch It? appeared first on Gizmo Story.

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Ex-Minneapolis officer pleads guilty in George Floyd killing

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Ex-Minneapolis officer pleads guilty in George Floyd killing

By AMY FORLITI, STEVE KARNOWSKI and MOHAMED IBRAHIM

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A former Minneapolis police officer pleaded guilty Wednesday to a state charge of aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter in the killing of George Floyd, admitting that he intentionally helped restrain the Black man in a way that created an unreasonable risk and caused his death.

As part of Thomas Lane’s plea agreement, a more serious count of aiding and abetting second-degree unintentional murder will be dismissed. Lane and former Officers J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao have already been convicted on federal counts of willfully violating Floyd’s rights. While they have yet to be sentenced on the federal charges, Lane’s change of plea means he will avoid what could have been a lengthy state sentence if he was convicted of murder.

The guilty plea comes a week before the two-year anniversary of Floyd’s May 25, 2020, killing. Floyd, 46, died after Officer Derek Chauvin, who is white, pinned him to the ground with a knee on Floyd’s neck as Floyd repeatedly said he couldn’t breathe. The killing, captured on widely viewed bystander video, sparked protests in Minneapolis and around the globe as part of a reckoning over racial injustice.

Lane and Kueng helped restrain Floyd, who was handcuffed. Lane held down Floyd’s legs and Kueng knelt on Floyd’s back. Thao kept bystanders from intervening during the 9 1/2-minute restraint.

All three are free on bond; the state trial scheduled for June is expected to proceed for Kueng, who is Black, and Thao, who is Hmong American.

Lane is scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 21.

In his plea agreement, Lane admitted that he knew from his training that restraining Floyd in that way created a serious risk of death, and that he heard Floyd say he couldn’t breathe, knew Floyd fell silent, had no pulse and appeared to have lost consciousness.

The plea agreement says Lane knew Floyd should have been rolled onto his side — and evidence shows he asked twice if that should be done — but he continued to assist in the restraint despite the risk. Lane agreed the restraint was “unreasonable under the circumstances and constituted an unlawful use of force.”

The state and Lane’s attorneys agreed to a recommended sentence of three years — which is below state sentencing guidelines — and prosecutors agreed to allow him to serve that penalty at the same time as any federal sentence, and in a federal prison. One legal expert said this would appeal to Lane because he would have less chance of being incarcerated with people he had arrested.

Lane, who is white, told Judge Peter Cahill that he understood the agreement. When asked how he would plead, he said: “Guilty, your honor.”

Attorney General Keith Ellison, whose office prosecuted the case, issued a statement saying he was pleased that Lane accepted responsibility.

“His acknowledgment he did something wrong is an important step toward healing the wounds of the Floyd family, our community, and the nation,” Ellison said. “While accountability is not justice, this is a significant moment in this case and a necessary resolution on our continued journey to justice.”

Lane’s attorney, Earl Gray, said in a statement that Lane did not want to risk a lengthy prison sentence if convicted of murder, so he agreed to plead guilty to manslaughter.

“He has a newborn baby and did not want to risk not being part of the child’s life,” Gray said.

Wednesday’s hearing was streamed over Zoom for Floyd’s family members. Their attorneys issued a statement afterward, saying Lane’s plea “reflects a certain level of accountability,” but that it came only after his federal conviction.

“Hopefully, this plea helps usher in a new era where officers understand that juries will hold them accountable, just as they would any other citizen,” family attorneys Ben Crump, Jeff Storms and Antonio Romanucci said. “Perhaps soon, officers will not require families to endure the pain of lengthy court proceedings where their criminal acts are obvious and apparent.”

Chauvin pleaded guilty last year to a federal charge of violating Floyd’s civil rights and faces a federal sentence ranging from 20 to 25 years. The former officer earlier was convicted of state charges of murder and manslaughter is currently serving 22 1/2 years in the state case.

Lane’s plea comes during a week when the country is focused on the deaths of 10 Black people in Buffalo, New York, at the hands of an 18-year-old white man, who carried out the racist, livestreamed shooting Saturday in a supermarket.

Lane, Kueng and Thao were convicted of federal charges in February, after a monthlong trial that focused on the officers’ training and the culture of the police department. All three were convicted of depriving Floyd of his right to medical care and Thao and Kueng were also convicted of failing to intervene to stop Chauvin during the killing.

After their federal conviction, there was a question as to whether the state trial would proceed. At an April hearing in state court, prosecutors revealed that they had offered plea deals to all three men, but they were rejected. At the time, Gray said it was hard for the defense to negotiate when the three still don’t know what their federal sentences would be.

Rachel Moran, a law professor at the University of St. Thomas, said it’s possible Lane received a better offer, though the public doesn’t know what happened behind the scenes. As for the other officers, she said Lane’s guilty plea has “got to make them think.”

“Particularly when I think most people would conceive of Thomas Lane as the least culpable of the three — and he’s the one pleading guilty,” Moran said. “Now if you are one of the other two left standing, it might change your position. … They may have less appealing offers to work with, but it still puts pressure on them.”

Under state sentencing guidelines, a person with no criminal record could face a sentence ranging from just under 3 1/2 years to four years and nine months in prison for second-degree unintentional manslaughter, with the presumptive sentence being four years. Lane’s recommended sentence of three years, which still must be approved by the judge, would be five months less than the low range.

If Lane had been convicted of aiding and abetting second-degree murder, he would have faced a presumptive 12 1/2 years in prison. And prosecutors served notice in 2020 that they intended to seek longer sentences for Lane, Kueng and Thao — as they did for Chauvin.

“That’s a very sweet deal,” John Baker, a former defense attorney who teaches aspiring police officers at St. Cloud State University, said of Lane’s agreement.

Baker said a guilty plea makes sense and he would not be surprised if at least one of the other former officers also took a deal.

An attorney for Thao, Robert Paule, was in the courtroom for Lane’s plea hearing. When asked if his client would also plead guilty, he replied “No comment.”

Kueng’s attorney, Tom Plunkett, also declined to comment.

Storms, one of the Floyd family attorneys, said the deal with Lane happened “very quickly.” When asked if he knew of any other possible negotiations with Thao or Kueng, he declined to comment on that, but said: “I think the family is hopeful, now that a state and federal jury have spoken, that the other officers will voluntarily be held accountable.”

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Mohamed Ibrahim is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

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Find AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd at:

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Amar’e Stoudemire clarifies comments on Kyrie Irving and leaving the Nets

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Amar’e Stoudemire clarifies comments on Kyrie Irving and leaving the Nets

Former Nets assistant Amar’e Stoudemire suggested there’s no bad blood between him, the Nets or Kyrie Irving, and that the media took his words in an appearance on ESPN’s First Take out of context.

Stoudemire, who broke the news of his departure from Steve Nash’s coaching staff in a May 12 nationally-televised conversation with ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith, posted a video with a caption that categorized the media as “misinformed” on Wednesday for the widespread reporting that he quit on the Nets after two failed seasons in Brooklyn without an NBA title – or a trip beyond the second round of the playoffs.

“I want to clarify something: I’m seeing articles right now popping up saying ‘Amar’e quits the Nets and criticized Kyrie on his way out,’” the former Phoenix Suns All-Star forward said in the video. “That’s not the case.”

In his discussion on ESPN, Stoudemire also admitted Irving’s decision not to get vaccinated against COVID-19 played a role in the Nets’ early season struggles that eventually led to them not being prepared or cohesive enough to secure a win against the Celtics in the first round of the playoffs.

New York City’s vaccine mandate rendered the All-Star guard ineligible for home games until late March, and the Nets moved in lockstep with the city mandate, ruling Irving ineligible for road games and home practices until making him eligible in mid-December with his debut coming in early January.

“Yeah, I think (not having Kyrie) hurt us,” Stoudemire said on May 12. “It definitely hurt us because we didn’t have the consistency with Kyrie enough to build chemistry for the group with the team. He plays only on away games depending on which city it is, can’t play in New York, therefore you have different lineups and different matchups depending on the game schedule.

“So it made it difficult for us coaches to figure out who’s going to play in spite of Kyrie. The chemistry is not where we would like it to be, so it was difficult for us to manage that.”

Stoudemire clarified those comments on Instagram on Wednesday after multiple local and national news outlets posted stories suggesting his comments were a dig at Irving on his way out the Nets’ doors.

“Why would I criticize someone who’s as similar as I am? I also fast during the NBA season for Yom Kippur,” he said. “I’m also a guy who has religious intake. I’m also a guy who’s an activist, who speaks about African-American communities. So why would I criticize someone who’s as similar as I am?

“The media will try to turn your words against your fellow friend or organization to provide more viewers or clicks to their article,” he continued. “I’m not gonna allow that to happen. You’re not gonna turn me against Kyrie, you’re not gonna turn me against the Nets, you’re not gonna turn me against anyone. So you can forget about it.”

The short-lived Nets player development coach also said he spoke to Steve Nash prior to going onto First Take and left his job because he didn’t feel it was a good fit from a scheduling standpoint.

Stoudemire converted to Judaism in August of 2020 and said his inability to work during Shabbat – from sunset on Friday to sunset on Saturday – made him feel he couldn’t grow in the coaching space.

“Not working on Friday night and Saturdays is difficult for anyone to grow in the coaching space because coaching is such a grind. It requires you to be there full-time,” he said. “And for me, I was unable to grow in that space, so I did not want to continue coaching, and on the flip side, the Nets organization wants people who can be there full-time, and I totally understand that. Therefore, it was a mutual organization between them and I.

“(The Nets are a) beautiful organization, Sean Marks and I are great friends, Steve Nash and I are good friends,” he continued. “I had a beautiful time, an amazing experience with the organization. There’s no hard feelings no way, no how. There’s no quitting on my side. I was there for 2 years sacrificing my time away from my family for those 2 year but still was able to hold down the fort and fulfill my obligation. So there’s no quitting from that standpoint.”

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