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How will we eat in 2022? The food forecasters speak.

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How will we eat in 2022? The food forecasters speak.

Last year at this time, optimistic trend forecasters predicted that the cork would burst from the bottle by summer. With vaccines in arms, food culture would vibrate in a robust economy. American menus would be full of innovation driven by waves of international travel, and a new generation of digital-native cooks would rewrite the rules.

Clearly, the prediction game can be a losing one. But so what if things didn’t turn out like everyone thought they would? Trying to forecast food trends is still fun and sometimes even accurate. (Kudos to those professional prognosticators who in recent years nailed the mainstream rise of quesabirria, soufflé pancakes, delivery-only restaurants and CBD. And a special citation for those who saw early on that those ripples of veganism would become a plant-based tsunami.)

So, how are things looking for 2022? Not great. The year is starting with a surge of a highly contagious variant of COVID-19 that is only adding to the economic uncertainty. Social justice concerns remain top of mind for many, as does pressure from a fast-changing climate. All of it will affect how food is grown, cooked and packaged.

But don’t despair.

“Constraint breeds innovation,” said Anna Fabrega, a former Amazon executive who recently took over as CEO at the meal subscription service Freshly.

She and other food industry leaders in the United States say 2022 will be another pragmatic, roll-up-your-sleeves kind of year, shaped by the needs of people working from home and by the culinarily-astute-but-fickle Gen Z, whose members want food with sustainable ingredients and a strong cultural backstory, prepared without exploitation and delivered in a carbon-neutral way — within 30 minutes.

With that in mind, here are some potential developments, big and small, that could define how we eat in the new year, based on a review of dozens of trend reports and interviews with food company executives, global market researchers and others who make it their business to scour the landscape for what’s next.

Ingredient of the Year

Mushrooms have landed on many prediction lists, in almost every form, from psilocybin mushrooms (part of the renewed interest in psychedelics) to thick coins of king oyster mushrooms as a stand-in for scallops. The number of small urban farms growing mushrooms is expected to bloom, and mushroom fibers will start to proliferate as a cheap, compostable medium for packaging.

Drink of the Year

Even in the age of no-alcohol cocktails, all those 1980s drinks you can barely remember (for obvious reasons) are coming back. Look for Blue Lagoons, Tequila Sunrises, Long Island iced tea and amaretto sours re-engineered with fresh juices, less sugar and better spirits.

“We all need things that are sweet and colorful and joyful and playful, especially now,” said Andrew Freeman, president of AF & Co., the San Francisco consulting firm that for 14 years has published a popular food and hospitality trend report. (A corollary to the cocktails: the rise of ecospirits, made with ingredients from local farms or food waste and packaged and shipped using climate-friendly methods.)

Chicken, Re-hatched

Meat grown in laboratories from animal cells is on its way to winning federal approval as soon as the end of 2022, and chicken will be one of the first products to become available. But plant-based chicken from companies like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat have recently arrived in groceries and restaurants, and the battle is on to determine which substitute will dominate the market.

And in the real-chicken world, a shortage of wings has restaurants trying to persuade the masses to love a different part of the chicken. The Wingstop chain, for instance, has expanded its brand with Thighstop.

Seaweed to the Rescue

Kelp grows fast, has a stand-up nutritional profile and removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and nitrogen from the ocean. As a result, farmed kelp will move beyond dashi and the menus at some high-end restaurants and into everyday foods like pasta and salsa.

Candy Nostalgia

Nostalgic childhood favorites from China (White Rabbit candy and haw flakes) and South Korea (the honeycomblike treat ppopgi, aka dalgona candy, and Apollo straws) will work their way into American shopping carts and recipes for desserts and drinks.

Robusta Rising

The third-wave coffee movement was built on arabica, the world’s most popular coffee. But climate change is threatening production and driving prices up, said Kara Nielsen, who tracks food and drink trends for WGSN, a consumer forecasting and consulting firm. Enter robusta, the bitter, heavily caffeinated workhorse that is less expensive and easier to cultivate. It is the predominant bean grown in Vietnam, where coffee is made with a metal filter called a phin and sweetened with condensed milk and sometimes an egg yolk.

A new style of Vietnamese coffee shop is popping up in many U.S. cities, promising to take the robusta right along with it.

Tasty Tableware

The quality of edible spoons, chopsticks, plates, bowls and cups is going up and the price is going down, signaling the start of a full-fledged edible-packaging revolution aimed at reducing single-use containers and plastic waste.

Sugar and ‘Swice’

Mash-ups like “swicy” and “swalty” will join the linguistic mania that brought us unfortunate nicknames like char coot and Cae sal (charcuterie and Caesar salad, that is). The new phraseology reflects an even wider embrace of flavor fusions that marry savory spices and heat with sweetness. Nene, a South Korean-based fried chicken chain that is just starting to move into North America, has even named a sauce swicy. Its flavor profile mirrors what would happen if gochujang and ketchup had a baby.

Flavor of the Year

Yuzu has its fans, but the even money is on hibiscus, which is adding its crimson hue and tart, earthy flavor to everything from cocktails and sodas to crudos and yogurt.

A Focus on India

With COVID limiting international travel in 2021, U.S. cooks explored regional American food. In 2022, regional foods from India will get a lot of attention, with deep dives into dishes from Gujarat, Kerala, Kashmir, Tamil Nadu and the Awadh area.

Vibe of the Year

With the supply chain in tatters and restaurant staffs stretched nearly to the breaking point, demanding shoppers and diners are out, and patience is in. A growing interest in the historical and cultural nature of food and its impact on the climate will only add to what forecasters (optimistically) say will be a new emphasis on kindness and understanding.

As Jennifer Zigler, associate director of food and drink at the research firm Mintel, put it, “We’ve all gone through this stressful, anxious couple of years, and there’s that willingness to have some empathy and understanding.”

A Buffet of Other Bites

Beyond the big trends are a long menu of smaller ones: the growing popularity of Koji bacon, the Chinese spirit baijiu and the noodle soup laksa. Jollof rice will appear on menus and in the frozen-foods section. Seeds will muscle in on nuts as an alternative protein source, in products like butters and ice creams. And look for a burst of new interest in animal-free cheese, potato milk, moringa, Taiwanese breakfast dishes, high tea and olives.

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Vampire In The Garden On Netflix: Should You Stream It Or Skip It? What Our Critic Has To Say?

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Vampire In The Garden On Netflix: Should You Stream It Or Skip It? What Our Critic Has To Say?

Vampire In The Garden, released on 16th May, raises our curiosity about what it means. Therefore, to ease your curiosity a bit, we will help you with this article about what it is all about for you to decide whether to watch it. RyōtarōMakiharaand assistant Hiroyuki Tanaka directed the series is not your normal vampire and human story but is something that would take you on a roller coaster ride.

Skip It Or See It?

Wit Studio created series is a MUST SEE because it brings a post dystopian and grim reality of the war between Vampire and Humans, and the core theme of the show is desperation. It is not a normal vampire story based on the commonality between two opposite species – humans and vampires.

The story will bring tears after seeing the struggle, desperation, desire, relationship, and tragedy. There are also hints of love between Momo and Fine. It is violent and gory because vampires and humans cannot exist, resulting in war.

The visuals and art are something worth watching. The trailer and the series have both managed to grab the audience’s attention, as in the first few minutes, the attention has been captivated.

The series is not just revolving around one aspect but includes several emotions and metaphorically comments on the contemporary world. Several people are struggling to survive and are searching for peace either by dying or by living alone, making it somewhat relatable and thus a must-watch.

The series will be emotional as it was clear from the trailer itself that the bond between Momo and Fine is intense, and that would bring tears and the fact that in a society, its not just what you see. Still, some people might be enemies or opposites in some parts, but they coexist happily.

Love has no boundaries, and so does desperation, and that is what the show presents; And how can we forget about the animation and voice cast that hits the emotion directly into our hearts, making it even more watch-worthy?

1652828587 713 Vampire In The Garden On Netflix Should You Stream It

About The Series

Vampire in the garden is an anime series based on an unusual story about a human and a vampire. The story entails the battle where humanity loses against vampires and gets hold of most of the land. Some humans who survived the bloody battle set up a wall of light in a town to help them survive and protect one another from the monsters.

To save themselves, they even destroyed all forms of art, music and culture to keep the bloodthirsty monsters at bay. Momo, the protagonist, lives a difficult life and is tired of all the conflicts and wishes to have a way out so that she can be alone.

On the vampire’s side, there is Fine, the vampire queen who makes a great effort to exist with the vampires because she has given up on feeding on humans and surviving on blood and thus is finding a place to die peacefully.

The commonality between both Momo and Fine is that they want the conflict to stop. Thus when they encounter each other; this commonality se them off to search for a place called Eden where the vampire and humans play music together.

A garden that no one has seen before or heard of. Both of them are looking for a way to get out f the pain and troubles but do they succeed? To know that, you have to see the series.

The Cast

The cast of the show includes Yu Kobayashi; the voice actor for the character of Fine and Megumi Han, the voice actor behind the character Momo. Chiaki Kobayashi voices Allegro, Nobara is voiced by Rika FUkami, and Hiroki Tochi voices Kubo.

Where To Watch?

The animated series released on 16th May can be streamed exclusively on Netflix and consists of 5 episodes, almost 25-30 minutes long.

So please don’t wait and stream it now before you get spoilers from others. 

The post Vampire In The Garden On Netflix: Should You Stream It Or Skip It? What Our Critic Has To Say? appeared first on Gizmo Story.

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New visitor center debuts at Historic Fort Snelling over Memorial Day weekend

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New visitor center debuts at Historic Fort Snelling over Memorial Day weekend

The Minnesota Historical Society announced on Tuesday that it is “reintroducing” Historic Fort Snelling to the public over Memorial Day weekend.

A new visitor center — located inside newly rehabilitated 1904 cavalry barracks — will open to the public on May 28.

Over Memorial Day weekend, visitors can check out the new visitor center as well as the site’s expanded interpretive spaces, scenic walking paths and improved overlooks, Indigenous landscapes with native plantings and other changes. The site, which is a National Historic Landmark, also has improved accessibility, parking and a picnic spot.

Thanks to staff and historians, the public can now come to Fort Snelling and learn about the site’s role over time, from when it was the homeland of the Dakota to its role in World War II and beyond.

The changes, made over more than two years, cost $34.5 million, with $19.5 million provided by the state of Minnesota and $15 million from private funding.

Public programming during Memorial Day weekend includes live music, a Civil War cannon demonstration, an 1890s mechanized infantry bicycle demonstration and a World War I demonstration that shows how the game of baseball was used to train soldiers on the use of gas masks.

With its reintroduction, the visitor center and the site will now be open throughout the year, instead of just seasonally.

Memorial Day weekend at Fort Snelling

  • Location: Historic Fort Snelling is located at Minnesota Highways 5 and 55 overlooking the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers, 200 Tower Ave., St. Paul.
  • Hours/dates: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Saturday, May 28, through Monday, May 30; Summer hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays – Sundays; closed Labor Day
  • Admission: $12 for adults, $10 for seniors (65 and older), college students and active military; $8 for children ages 5 to 17
  • Parking: $6 ($4 for members of the Minnesota Historical Society)
  • Info: Mnhs.org/fortsnelling
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ESPN Films producing ‘30 for 30′ documentary on Ravens’ 2000 Super Bowl team

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ESPN Films producing ‘30 for 30′ documentary on Ravens’ 2000 Super Bowl team

The Ravens’ first Super Bowl-winning team is getting a closer look.

ESPN Films announced Tuesday that production has started on a “30 for 30″ documentary on the 2000 Ravens, whose dominant defense powered the team to a Super Bowl XXXV title. ESPN Films said in its release that “no team in NFL history has boasted, bullied or brandished as much bravado” as those Ravens, who were led by colorful coaches like Brian Billick and players like inside linebacker Ray Lewis.

“The rest of the NFL hated the Ravens but no one could say a thing, because they couldn’t beat them on the field, especially facing, arguably, the greatest defense ever,” ESPN Films said in its release. “Luckily for sports fans, their full-throated reign coincided perfectly with the rise of the ‘reality television’ era via Hard Knocks.”

The documentary will be co-directed by Ken Rodgers, who has directed several NFL documentaries for ESPN Films’ “30 for 30″ series, and Jason Weber, a producer for the NFL. Further details will be announced later.

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