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Opinion: Colorado must address workforce age discrimination

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Opinion: Colorado must address workforce age discrimination

We have a paradox going on in Colorado: employers are desperately looking for talent, and older adults are desperately looking for work. But workforce age discrimination makes it difficult for older Coloradans to fully contribute to the labor market.

For years, older workers from every corner of the state have told me their frustrating and often heartbreaking stories of age discrimination that prevented them from landing needed jobs, that they faced once in the workplace, and that they felt as they were forced out.

Stories like these: a man who was a colleague of mine, a fundraising pro with decades of success who couldn’t get callbacks for development jobs; a former corporate marketing VP who was told that she lost out to a younger applicant because the hiring manager assumed she would not be social media savvy; a group of women in their 60s forced to live on small social security checks — this despite help-wanted signs in almost every store window in their Western Slope town.

Such age discrimination is common: studies from AARP and others show that 78% of workers over 45 have seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace and over one-half of long-time, employees age 50 and over are forced to leave positions before they would voluntarily choose to do so. Once this happens, only 10% of them ever regain their previous economic status.

Nationwide, the country lost $850 billion in GDP due to age discrimination and that could grow to $3.9 trillion by 2050, reports the AARP.

Discrimination based upon age has especially harmful consequences for already economically vulnerable groups like women, people of color, and those with low incomes.

There are many reasons to work toward ending workforce age discrimination. There are ways to do it, and there’s no time to waste.

First off, ending age discrimination is good for business. Older adults provide numerous benefits in the workplace. Intergenerational teams create mentoring opportunities, improve team problem-solving, and increase creativity born from combining different perspectives and histories.

Keeping older workers on the job strengthens economies from Main Street to Wall Street. Ongoing paychecks mean more disposable income spent and more taxes paid, while tax-supported benefits can be delayed.

Older adults also need to continue working: the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that 48% of households headed by a person aged 55 or older lack retirement savings. The median 401(k) balance for those between 55 and 64 is less than $15,000. For older adults who lack adequate savings, continuing to work past the traditional retirement age is an economic necessity.

Last, but not least, older adults want to continue working, and continued workforce participation may be connected to better physical and mental health for older adults.

When the legislature reconvenes in January, we can change our workforce discrimination laws so that our economy benefits from the experience and wisdom of older workers.

We must end requirements that job applicants write their high school graduation dates or other age-identifiers on application forms. Right now, it is illegal to ask someone their age, but not their high school graduation date.

And also, ensure that the penalties for age discrimination are commensurate with those for other forms of discrimination. Currently in Colorado, compensatory and punitive damages are allowed in race and gender discrimination cases, but not for age.

Make clear that Colorado’s age discrimination laws apply to hiring, and that the burden of providing age discrimination is not higher than for other forms of discrimination.

Some problems seem overwhelming and too big to solve, but this is one we can address. Certainly, we can’t legislate away ageism, but we can give older workers the same protections afforded to other groups — and we can help businesses get and keep the workers they need.

Janine Vanderburg directs Changing the Narrative, a Colorado-based campaign to change the way people think, talk and act about aging and ageism. The end game? To end ageism. You can read more about what they are doing to reduce workplace ageism.

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit online or check out our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

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UCF offers Daytona Beach Mainland 2024 safety Zay Mincey

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UCF offers Daytona Beach Mainland 2024 safety Zay Mincey

The last few players rom Daytona Beach Mainland High to play for UCF turned out to be quite productive. Knights coaches are hoping 2024 safety Zavier “Zay” Mincey is next.

Mincey was offered a scholarship by UCF on Tuesday, one of numerous offers the big defensive back — 6-foot-3, 190 pounds — has picked up recently. Mincey now has 13 offers from schools including Auburn, Notre Dame, Ole Miss and Texas A&M, so the Knights have their work cut out for them to win him over,

Mincey, a multi-sport standout, competed at the Florida Track and Field Championships in Gainesville this past week. He didn’t have his best performances, but finished 10th in the long jump (21 feet, 4¾ inches) and 11th in the high jump (5 feet, 11½ inches).

Last season for Mainland, Mincey averaged 3.2 tackles per game and had 1 tackle for loss. He also had 2 interceptions and 6 pass deflections.

The recent history of success for Mainland players at UCF was highlighted by the self-proclaimed fastest man in college football Adrian Killins, who finished his UCF career as the fifth-best rusher in UCF history with 2,459 career rushing yards and 25 touchdowns. Killins was last in the NFL as a roster player with the Denver Broncos. He is a free agent.

Offensive tackle Marcus Tatum also had a solid stay at UCF after transferring from Tennessee. Tatum earned all-AAC honors in each of his final two seasons as a Knight. Tatum recently signed a free-agent contract with the Jacksonville Jaguars.

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The Staircase Episode 5: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations

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The Staircase Episode 5: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations

An American crime drama mini-series, The Staircase, will release its 5th episode on May 19th. The episode titled “The Beating Heart” would air on HBO Max. The true-crime drama is created by Antonio Campos and stars Colin Firth and Toni Collette as the main protagonist. The drama is based on the famous Michel Peterson trial.

Produced by Annapurna Television, What’s up Films, and Emi pop, the mini-series is distributed by Warner Bros Discovery Global Streaming & Interactive Entertainment. Michael Stuhlbarg, Sophie Turner, Dane DeHaan, Olivia DdeJonge, Patrick Schwarzeneggar, and Rosemarie DeWitt assist Firth and Collette in their roles play important characters in the drama.

Here’s all you need to know before watching the episode.

Michael Peterson Trial

Based on a true crime story and the docuseries by Jean-Xavier de Lestrade with the same name; the Staircase premiered on HBO Max on May 5th; and received great, positive reception for the stellar cast performances (especially by Firth).

It is based on the Michael Peterson trial, which was a pretty deal as it remains one of the longest trials in the history of North Carolina. In 2001, Peterson’s wife, Kathleen, was reported by him to be found unconscious; at the bottom of the stairs in their home in Durham, North Carolina.

She was later declared dead, and her autopsy result showed that she died of several injuries that hint at homicide.

Peterson was bisexual; and that upon finding his sexuality and his adultery with another male, Kathleen had confronted him. And in a bid of rage, he had killed her. The American novelist was arrested on the charge of murdering his wife in 2001.

In 2003, he was guilty and was sentenced to life in prison, getting released in 2011.

1652901008 32 The Staircase Episode 5 May 19 Release Time And Plot

The Staircase Episode 5: What To Expect? Plot Speculation 

The eight-episode mini series following the trial and appeal period of Michael Peterson will be releasing its 5th episode coming May 19th.

The last episode saw the trial reaching its final verdict; with Elizabeth Ratliff’s autopsy result coming to the forefront, giving the whole case a new perspective. Ratliff have injuries similar to Kathleen; and it is proven that Peterson is the last person to be with her before she was found dead the next morning.

It leads to further doubts in Martha and Margaret, Elizabeth’s daughters and Michael’s adoptive daughters, who have started to turn against him.

The next episode (episode 5) will have the viewers see the consequences of the verdict that Peterson; and his family would be dealing with and the full aftermath of the jury’s decision.

On the other hand, the last episode also left viewers at a stump when it revealed during the 2017 documentary interview that Sophie Brunet has been with Peterson for the past 12 years.

When And Where To Watch Episode 5? 

Episode 5 of The Staircase will release and available to stream on HBO max on May 19th, Thursday at 3 AM ET.

The post The Staircase Episode 5: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations appeared first on Gizmo Story.

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2 killed in Anoka crash that following police pursuit

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2 killed in Anoka crash that following police pursuit

ANOKA, Minn. (AP) — Two men died after fleeing from an attempted traffic stop and later crashing into a pickup truck in Anoka County, sheriff’s officials said.

Police in Coon Rapids tried to make the traffic stop shortly before midnight Tuesday. The driver took off and police pursued the car, but broke off the chase once the vehicle crossed into Anoka.

Officials said the car and pickup collided about a mile away. The force of the crash took down at least three light poles, according to witnesses.

The driver was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash. His passenger died at a nearby hospital. The driver of the pickup was treated for minor injuries. The victims have not been identified.

The crash remains under investigation by the Anoka Police Department, Coon Rapids Police Department, Minnesota State Patrol, Anoka County Sheriff’s Office and the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office.

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