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Denver man dies in snowboarding accident at Aspen Highlands

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Denver man dies in snowboarding accident at Aspen Highlands

ASPEN — A snowboarder who died after crashing into a tree at Colorado’s Aspen Highlands Ski Area has been identified as 42-year-old Trevor Crandall of Denver.

Crandall’s name was released Thursday by the Pitkin County Coroner’s Office, which ruled his death was accidental.

Pitkin County sheriff’s officials have said Crandall was with a friend when he crashed in the Highlands Bowl on Wednesday afternoon. Ski patrollers performed CPR after finding him unconscious, but he was pronounced dead at the scene a short time later.

No one saw the accident, but rescuers determined he had crashed into a tree.

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New visitor center debuts at Historic Fort Snelling over Memorial Day weekend

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New visitor center debuts at Historic Fort Snelling over Memorial Day weekend

The Minnesota Historical Society announced on Tuesday that it is “reintroducing” Historic Fort Snelling to the public over Memorial Day weekend.

A new visitor center — located inside newly rehabilitated 1904 cavalry barracks — will open to the public on May 28.

Over Memorial Day weekend, visitors can check out the new visitor center as well as the site’s expanded interpretive spaces, scenic walking paths and improved overlooks, Indigenous landscapes with native plantings and other changes. The site, which is a National Historic Landmark, also has improved accessibility, parking and a picnic spot.

Thanks to staff and historians, the public can now come to Fort Snelling and learn about the site’s role over time, from when it was the homeland of the Dakota to its role in World War II and beyond.

The changes, made over more than two years, cost $34.5 million, with $19.5 million provided by the state of Minnesota and $15 million from private funding.

Public programming during Memorial Day weekend includes live music, a Civil War cannon demonstration, an 1890s mechanized infantry bicycle demonstration and a World War I demonstration that shows how the game of baseball was used to train soldiers on the use of gas masks.

With its reintroduction, the visitor center and the site will now be open throughout the year, instead of just seasonally.

Memorial Day weekend at Fort Snelling

  • Location: Historic Fort Snelling is located at Minnesota Highways 5 and 55 overlooking the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers, 200 Tower Ave., St. Paul.
  • Hours/dates: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Saturday, May 28, through Monday, May 30; Summer hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays – Sundays; closed Labor Day
  • Admission: $12 for adults, $10 for seniors (65 and older), college students and active military; $8 for children ages 5 to 17
  • Parking: $6 ($4 for members of the Minnesota Historical Society)
  • Info: Mnhs.org/fortsnelling
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ESPN Films producing ‘30 for 30′ documentary on Ravens’ 2000 Super Bowl team

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ESPN Films producing ‘30 for 30′ documentary on Ravens’ 2000 Super Bowl team

The Ravens’ first Super Bowl-winning team is getting a closer look.

ESPN Films announced Tuesday that production has started on a “30 for 30″ documentary on the 2000 Ravens, whose dominant defense powered the team to a Super Bowl XXXV title. ESPN Films said in its release that “no team in NFL history has boasted, bullied or brandished as much bravado” as those Ravens, who were led by colorful coaches like Brian Billick and players like inside linebacker Ray Lewis.

“The rest of the NFL hated the Ravens but no one could say a thing, because they couldn’t beat them on the field, especially facing, arguably, the greatest defense ever,” ESPN Films said in its release. “Luckily for sports fans, their full-throated reign coincided perfectly with the rise of the ‘reality television’ era via Hard Knocks.”

The documentary will be co-directed by Ken Rodgers, who has directed several NFL documentaries for ESPN Films’ “30 for 30″ series, and Jason Weber, a producer for the NFL. Further details will be announced later.

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Minnesota State students face likely 3.5% tuition increase

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Minnesota State students face likely 3.5% tuition increase

Almost every Minnesota State college and university is expected to increase tuition by 3.5 percent next year, system officials said Tuesday.

Budgets aren’t due to the system office till next week, but Bill Maki, vice chancellor of finance and facilities, said almost every campus plans to raise tuition by the maximum allowed by the Legislature.

Leaders of the public higher education system asked lawmakers to pay for a tuition freeze next year, but Maki said there was little interest.

The 3.5 percent figure happens to match what University of Minnesota President Joan Gabel has proposed for the Twin Cities and Rochster campuses, while Duluth, Morris and Crookston want 1.75 percent. Unlike Minnesota State, the U’s tuition increases are not constrained by the Legislature.

Maki said the cost of student housing and meal plans will go up by more than usual next year — 3.7 percent on average, he said, or $344.

The average annual cost of a 3.5 percent tuition hike would be $289 for Minnesota State universities and $185 for colleges.

Winona State University President Scott Olson told the Minnesota State Board of Trustees on Tuesday that next year’s incoming class is on track to be 15 percent larger. But prices are rising fast on library materials, he said, and the university is looking to increase wages for student workers so those jobs don’t go unfilled.

“Inflation is a big worry,” he said.

Joe Mulford, president of Pine Technical and Community College, said his school is “an expensive place” because it’s heavy on career and technical courses. Unlike other schools, Pine Tech’s enrollment has been strong, he said, but it hasn’t been enough to offset the rising cost of supplies.

Minnesota State system enrollment has fallen for 11 consecutive years. In just the last two years, its colleges have lost 13 percent of their students and universities 10 percent, Maki said.

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