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‘Godspeed, Chief’; Jefferson County law enforcement mourns police chief’s death

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‘Godspeed, Chief’; Jefferson County law enforcement mourns police chief’s death

ST. LOUIS (KTVI)–Law enforcement agencies around the Jefferson County region are remembering one of their own who died Thursday morning. Jefferson College Police Chief Don Riffe passed away, surrounded by loved ones, his family said. The school said he had been hospitalized for an extended period of time.

Riffe, who had been police chief at the school since July 2018, was also the primary firearms instructor at the Jefferson College Law Enforcement Academy and was active with JeffCo Shop-With-a-Cop.

“Chief Riffe had been with our organization from the start and he was instrumental in our growth. He gave so much to us with his volunteer work and financial contributions, but he never once asked for credit or anything in return. Every one of us have a great deal of love and respect for Chief Riffe, and we will all have his family in our thoughts and prayers,” Shop-With-A-Cop said in a Facebook tribute.

“On the range, Don blended technical instruction with life lessons, and helped mold an entire generation of new police officers who are collectively feeling this loss. Godspeed, Chief,” the Hillsboro Police Department said in another social media tribute.

“Any time we lose a member of the College family unexpectedly, our entire campus grieves. Don was a true professional in every sense of the word and his absence within the Jefferson College Police Department and Law Enforcement Academy will be felt by many. Our hearts go out to his family as we collectively mourn his passing,” Roger Barrentine, Director of Public Relations and Marketing for Jefferson College said in an email.

Funeral arrangements have not been announced. Riffe was 59.

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Salvation Army seeks 1,000 volunteers to deliver doughnuts to local heroes

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Salvation Army seeks 1,000 volunteers to deliver doughnuts to local heroes

Do you know a first responder, healthcare worker, teacher, veteran or helpful neighbor who could use a doughnut?

On June 3, which is National Donut Day, the Salvation Army Northern Division is looking for registered volunteers to fan out across the east metro and deliver a dozen doughnuts to their “local hero” of choice. The 12,000 doughnuts, which are being donated by Cub Foods, can be picked up from one of six metro Salvation Army locations.

Last year, the event drew just under 700 volunteers. This year, the goal is 1,000. Prospective doughnut deliverers must register in advance at SalvationArmyNorth.org/free-donuts.

As for recipients…

“It’s at the choosing of the volunteer,” said Dan Furry, a spokesman for the Salvation Army Northern Division. “We started doing this last year, and it worked very well. We’ll probably do it every year for Donut Day.”

Why doughnuts? Back in 1938, the Salvation Army’s “donut lassies” served up morale-boosting doughnuts, coffee and more to soldiers stationed in France, near the front lines of World War I. June 3 was set aside as a national recognition of their sweet service to the American troops, who returned home with a hankering for the fried confections.

Their appetites earned the returning soldiers the title “doughboys” and popularized the doughnut in post-war America.

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The Photographer: Murder in Pinamar On Netflix: May 19 Release, Time And What Is It About?

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The Photographer: Murder in Pinamar On Netflix: May 19 Release, Time And What Is It About?

Hold your seats fast! For there is another fiery documentary around the corner. On May 19, 2022, Netflix released The Photographer: Murder in Pinamar. The one hour and forty-six minutes long documentary will take us through the politically heated atmosphere of Argentina and focus on the death of Argentinian photojournalist Jose Luis Cabezas.

The co-writing team includes the names Tatiana Merenuk and Gabriel Bobillo. While Alejandro Hartmann is also one of the executive producers, Vanessa Ragone and Mariela Besuievsky have been a part of the executive production team.

The Plot

On the series’ description page on Netflix, the synopsis reads, “The crime of the photographer José Luis Cabezas, in the summer of 1997, shocks Argentina and reveals a mafia network in which the political and economic powers do not seem to be unrelated.

The consequences will be almost as dramatic as the crime itself, both for its instigator and the country.” The documentary again attempts to reassert the evil of governance and the mafia’s involvement in society’s underbellies, pulling the strings through the exploitation caused by money.

Freedom Of Press

The death of Jose Luis Cabezas was a lightning strike to every layman living in Argentina. This was a direct attack on the freedom of the press, for which people came out on the streets and protested this forced violence again.

It was a wake-up call for all; different media groups and human rights advocates asked for justice for Cabezas. The murder occurred during the times that one can  consider the golden age of the press in Argentina.

1652911028 825 The Photographer Murder in Pinamar On Netflix May 19 Release

The Conspiracy And Secrecy

For a long time in the initial investigation, it is believed that it is simply political motivation; where police  put sheets over it. However, a name soon popped up that shook the investigation in another direction, “Alfredo Yabran.” No one had ever seen his face in public; no photographs, no visual identification marker was present for him. 

This link led to new leads, and rumors started painting a whole new reality. Many people were apprehended from the area known as Los Hornos in the Bueno Aires province, and the case was put on trial in 2000 for the murder of Jose Luis Cabezas. They were sent to jail in feburary.

The Teaser

“Taking a picture of me is like shooting myself in the forehead,” almost horrifyingly; this line appears in the teaser released by Netflix. Yabran wanted to remain a ghost, but Cabezas was on his righteous mission.

The film is rates 16 and up, with children under 16 requiring parental supervision. Netflix describes it as provocative and investigative. Such unearthing of realities sure calls for a mature mind to deal with the complex reality we live in.

The post The Photographer: Murder in Pinamar On Netflix: May 19 Release, Time And What Is It About? appeared first on Gizmo Story.

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Making his fifth appearance in six years, Stillwater’s Alex Beach is a permanent fixture at PGA Championship

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Making his fifth appearance in six years, Stillwater’s Alex Beach is a permanent fixture at PGA Championship

Not all of Alex Beach’s family will be in attendance at Southern Hills this week in Tulsa, Okla., to watch the Stillwater native compete at this week’s PGA Championship. Turns out, this was their pre-determined cabin-opening weekend.

That confirms two things: No. 1, Beach is indeed Minnesotan. And, No. 2, that this is far from his first trip around the major championship block.

In fact, when he tees off in the first round at 2:31 p.m. Thursday, Beach will be making his fifth PGA Championship appearance over the past six years. He has gained entry into this particular golf major championship the same way each time, by finishing in the top 20 of the PGA Professional Championship. Doing so this year was not without drama.

In the final round of last month’s club pro championship, Beach thought he needed to finish at 1 under par for the 72-hole event to safely gain entry into another PGA Championship. But he got into the clubhouse at even par. That led to a nervy two-plus hours playing the waiting game. By the time everyone else was in, Beach and three others were tied for 18th — meaning a sudden-death playoff would be held to see which three of the four golfers would punch their tickets to the PGA Championship.

And, on the first playoff hole, Beach faced a birdie chip from off the green.

He drained it, clinching another major championship tee time in the process. The clip — which Beach says he has now seen more than 100 times — shows the 32-year-old carefully watching the ball’s roll, then somewhat casually dropping a finger down as the birdie dropped into the cup.

“I didn’t really celebrate much. I was so in the zone on the task at hand,” Beach said. “When it went in, honestly, it was just like blackout mode. My short game is pretty good, but I had some kind of streaky stretches during that tournament, and just kind of, poetically, to finish with some theatrics, I guess it’s fitting.”

It wasn’t until he was walking off the green with his caddie that Beach smiled and the reality of the achievement seemed to sink in. The first word Beach used to describe that playoff: “stressful.”

“Super happy and thrilled, lucky to get through it. I didn’t have my best stuff (at the tournament) in Texas, really had to grind it out and was lucky to finish high enough to get into the playoff, and then was very fortunate to chip in and kind of solidify my spot,” he said. “Yeah, that was wild.”

Frankly, so too is making a fifth PGA Championship appearance in six years. The assistant professional at Westchester Country Club in Rye, N.Y., is nearly as permanent a fixture at the premier event as the game’s top names.

“So in some ways it’s like, ‘Mark it on your calendar,’ but at the same time it’s the opposite of that,” said Beach, a 2007 Stillwater Area High School grad. “It’s so hard to get here for me and the 20 guys. But showing up to this week now, I’m so comfortable. I know a lot of the players. I’ve been fortunate to play with a lot of them many times now and I know how the week works, and I’ve always said the hardest thing out here for someone like myself is to get comfortable and feel like I belong. In some small way now I kind of feel like I’ve earned that, mainly to myself, not from anybody else.”

Beach’s goals entering this week are the same as always — to play well. He knows he’s good enough to compete at this level. He would love to make the 36-hole cut, something he hasn’t done in his four previous tries.

“Hopefully, in a couple days,” he said, “we can change that.”

That’s not to say he hasn’t been close. He was just a couple of shots off the number in 2020, and was inside the cut line in the second round last year before suffering a back injury that derailed his round.

The scores, he noted, don’t always reflect how close he has been. Beach believes Southern Hills, which puts a premium on distance and work around the greens, fits his game “really well.” He is accustomed to Midwest golf and championship golf. This setup checks both of those boxes. He said a number of holes appease the eye of the lefty’s cut off the tee. Perhaps all of those factors working in his favor will lead to a special week.

Beach puts pressure on himself to succeed, but added there’s so much more to this week than his tournament performance.

“The level of support that I have is truly humbling, and it’s so fun to share this experience with others, and that, for me, is what makes it special,” he said. “The true fun stuff happens on the course. (Tuesday,) signing autographs for some young kids and getting to have some laughs with them. That’s where this is truly special. For someone like myself, this isn’t my week-in, week-out job at this point — as much as I’d love it to be one day. So yeah, I’m going to try my hardest, but it’s been an incredible week.”

Of the 20 club pros, Beach’s fifth PGA Championship appearance ties him with Ryan Vermeer for most among the group. He has gotten to know so many people through his experiences, including countless PGA Tour players. They’re among those fascinated by the stories of the PGA club pros.

“They’re kind of rooting for us, too. It’s pretty much everybody. We’re the true underdog story,” Beach said. “We get to share what it’s like to play in an all-star game, which is pretty much what a PGA Championship is. And to hold our own, that just validates what we love to do and why we work hard.”

Beach’s advice to this week’s PGA professional newbies is simple: Savor the experience.

“Play well, play poorly, you earned the right to be here, you earned the right to smile, and you earned the right to enjoy what this week is, because you’re going to look back on it with incredible memories,” he said. “And hopefully it’s one of many/ But you’re never guaranteed much, so enjoy the walk.”

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