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How has the search for a new coach and GM been so far? And what does Bill Polian’s involvement mean? 4 questions for the Chicago Bears.

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How has the search for a new coach and GM been so far? And what does Bill Polian’s involvement mean? 4 questions for the Chicago Bears.

The Chicago Bears have been busy since firing Ryan Pace and Matt Nagy on Jan. 10. The team is in the process of interviewing 15 general manager and 10 coaching candidates, and the lists could grow.

As the interview process continues, our team weighs in on four timely topics.

1. If I were the Bears, I would hire __________.

Brad Biggs: The best combination of a general manager and coach they can get.

In doing so, they have to find two candidates who can work well together and have creative disagreement. The last thing the Bears want is to have a GM and coach who fall back on the word “collaboration” every time they’re seated together answering questions about the roster, moves that have been made and a philosophy for the team that expands beyond X’s and O’s. This means theylikely need to hire the GM first, which George McCaskey said was the most likely step in the process. That way, the new GM can have a hand in the process of selecting the coach even though it’s apparent Bill Polian is a central figure in this transition phase, maybe more so than Ernie Accorsi was in 2015. Whatever direction it takes them in, the Bears need the GM and coach prepared to work together with the understanding and expectation they’re not going to see eye to eye on everything. The Bears are at a critical stage with a young quarterback and a roster that is going to be retooled because of the number of pending free agents. It’s an understatement to say there’s a lot of heavy lifting to do.

Colleen Kane: A GM with experience and an offensive coach to guide Justin Fields.

McCaskey declared last week that the new GM would report directly to him and would have “the ultimate football authority and oversight over the entire football operation.” Meanwhile, McCaskey has said he is “not a football evaluator.” So if that is the structure the Bears want, they might be better suited hiring a GM with more experience — either in years or with different teams or roles — and with the contacts to build an impressive support staff rather than somebody green who still is in the early stages of learning how to run a team. Former Houston Texans GM Rick Smith is the most interesting name with those credentials out there, but the Bears should be able to zero in on others with the proper grooming on their lengthy list of candidates.

As for the coach, I understand that there are defensive-minded candidates that could be successful with the Bears, so I’m not saying someone such as Matt Eberflus or Todd Bowles wouldn’t be a good hire. But as I think about the potential the Bears have with Fields — and the ongoing problems the team has had at fixing the quarterback position — it makes me lean toward taking a swing at the best possible offensive mind. Find the candidate who marries those skills with good leadership qualities and play-calling experience, and I would be sold. Byron Leftwich and Brian Daboll are two intriguing names to me.

Dan Wiederer: Two undeniable leaders with a very specific vision plus connections around the league that will help them fortify their respective staffs in the front office and in the coaching realm.

I know you’re probably looking for two specific names here, two candidates projected to be slam-dunk hires. But with the Bears still in the first phase of interviewing at least 25 total applicants for both jobs, the list of possibilities and combinations remains too vast. Still, it cannot be emphasized enough just how important it is for the Bears to use this process to find a new GM who knows exactly what he wants, not only in a head coach who will work alongside him in a demanding rebuilding project but in the front office roles that will be significantly influential in establishing this team’s direction. Questions need to be asked in the interviewing process to learn about the vision and honest assessment of prospective candidates.

2. Bill Polian’s involvement in the Bears search is __________.

Biggs: Interesting.

What strikes me is how the team has toggled back and forth between GM and coaching candidates in the process. McCaskey said the plan, unless the Bears meet with a coaching candidate they are completely blown away by, is to hire the GM first. This leads me to believe Polian not only is going to have major say in who the Bears select as GM, he also is going to have considerable input in the selection of the head coach. Why else would the Bears go through such a deep list of coaching candidates while conducting initial GM interviews?

Kane: Important. But is it enough?

Polian has 32 years of NFL experience, led five teams that made Super Bowl appearances and hired Hall of Fame coaches Marv Levy and Tony Dungy. With those credentials, it very much seems as if this search is Polian’s show, even if McCaskey makes the final decision. Polian’s involvement, along with that of LaMar “Soup” Campbell to lend a player perspective and Tanesha Wade to lend her perspective as the team’s senior vice president of diversity, equity and inclusion, all make sense for the Bears. I simply wonder if the Bears could have used one more person with football scouting or coaching experience in the room with them.

McCaskey was asked about whether the search could have used someone younger — Polian is 79 and was fired by the Indianapolis Colts after the 2011 season — and he referenced George Halas’ hiring of Mike Ditka when Halas was 87. Fair enough, but I don’t know if having one more football mind in the room would have hurt anything. Or maybe Campbell and Wade serve as that younger-perspective balance. Really, we won’t be able to judge the search team’s success for a while.

Wiederer: Temporary.

Helpful but temporary. Polian united with the Bears some time during this season. (Conveniently, McCaskey couldn’t remember exactly when.) And after he helped guide McCaskey and team President and CEO Ted Phillips to a decision to fire Ryan Pace and Matt Nagy, Polian agreed to stick around to steer the hiring process. His credentials and connections, his insight and input will be invaluable to the Bears. But again, a month from now, Polian likely willvanish from the Bears’ decision-making process, with almost no skin in the game as a new GM and a new coach embark on a new journey at Halas Hall.

It all circles back to a question the Bears have never really provided an adequate answer to: If they acknowledge themselves that they need guidance from a consultant with a deep football background to help them make the biggest decisions in the oversight of building a championship football team, then why is there such a strong resistance to finding a younger, non-retired Polian-type to handle those duties full time in a role similar to president of football operations.

3. The Bears’ GM and coach searches so far have been __________.

Biggs: Thorough, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.

History shows that teams usually botch the hiring of the head coach — just look at the turnover rate around the league — and teams that strike first don’t stand out as the success stories. So with the Bears still working their way through initial meetings with GM and coaching candidates, one can hope this means they are leaving no stone unturned and no question unanswered in the process.

Kane: Slow.

That’s how it goes when there are at least 25 candidates to fill the two positions and the Bears check off only a couple a day.

McCaskey promised a “thorough, diligent and exhaustive” search, and the Bears have requested interviews with many of the top names to fill both jobs. That they can do the initial sessions over video conference call certainly helps the Bears logistically to keep such a long list, especially as several of the coaching candidates are with their teams in the playoffs.

It’s not necessarily a bad thing to take the time to speak with so many, as long as the Bears have a good process to narrow down their perspective hires and can do it before their ideal candidate is lured elsewhere. But of course I’m as impatient as Bears fans to see who it’s going to be.

Wiederer: Comprehensive.

Thorough. Perhaps a bit wayward. Consider the reality that, according to reports, Indianapolis Colts defensive coordinator Eberflus has been promised a second interview for the head coaching job before the Bears have hired a GM. And not only before the Bears have hired a GM but before they have come anywhere close to finishing their first-phase interviews for that job. McCaskey stressed last week that his preference was to hire a GM before moving on to hire a coach. But if that was the preference, why haven’t the Bears accelerated their efforts to get the GM position filled before doing so much extensive work exploring head coaching candidates? At some point, after the two hires are made, McCaskey, Phillips and Polian will have to provide more insight into the processes they used and the strategy that guided them. At this stage, the list of questions that need to be answered is growing.

4. The Bears interviewing coaches alongside GMs is

___

Biggs: A sign that Polian is likely going to have a strong voice in the selection of the team’s next coach. Polian had a terrific track record picking coaches when he was a GM, working with Levy, Dom Capers, Dungy and Jim Caldwell. That bodes well for the Bears involving the 79-year-old Hall of Famer. It also means the Bears are being very careful to ensure that they end up with what they believe is the best combination.

Kane: Probably fine — for now.

Hiring a coach before a GM is not a great idea because it could limit who the Bears are able to bring in for the GM position. But I don’t see a problem with the Bears going through the first round of interviews with coaches before the GM is in place. Such a process can help inform their interviews with GMs and help them determine which people are going to mesh best. And with seven other teams conducting coach interviews, it doesn’t hurt to do work to entice a hot candidate to join them.

However, I do wonder about them setting up second interviews — as reportedly has happened with Colts defensive coordinator Matt Eberflus — before they have a GM in place. Don’t they want the coach’s future direct boss to be there for the more serious inquiry? And what if the GM has a couple of coaches he also would like the Bears to consider?

Wiederer: Confusing.

As stated above, it just seems to be a little out of whack with the organization’s own stated priorities. Listen, there is little harm in interviewing prospective coaches before a GM is hired. But it also might be an inefficient use of time, particularly with such extensive candidate lists for both roles. If the Bears are intent on giving their next GM full autonomy over the football operations, then that GM must be afforded an opportunity to see the coaching search in his way, targeting candidates with his own interviewing process. Which means identifying the new GM has to be the most urgent priority. Hopefully by this time next week, the Bears will have found a path to the end of that search and will be ready to intensify their hunt for a new coach.

Biggs: A sign that Polian is likely going to have a strong voice in the selection of the team’s next coach. Polian had a terrific track record picking coaches when he was a GM, working with Levy, Dom Capers, Dungy and Jim Caldwell. That bodes well for the Bears involving the 79-year-old Hall of Famer. It also means the Bears are being very careful to ensure that they end up with what they believe is the best combination. Kane: Probably fine — for now. Hiring a coach before a GM is not a great idea because it could limit who the Bears are able to bring in for the GM position. But I don’t see a problem with the Bears going through the first round of interviews with coaches before the GM is in place. Such a process can help inform their interviews with GMs and help them determine which people are going to mesh best. And with seven other teams conducting coach interviews, it doesn’t hurt to do work to entice a hot candidate to join them. However, I do wonder about them setting up second interviews — as reportedly has happened with Colts defensive coordinator Matt Eberflus — before they have a GM in place. Don’t they want the coach’s future direct boss to be there for the more serious inquiry? And what if the GM has a couple of coaches he also would like the Bears to consider? Wiederer: Confusing. As stated above, it just seems to be a little out of whack with the organization’s own stated priorities. Listen, there is little harm in interviewing prospective coaches before a GM is hired. But it also might be an inefficient use of time, particularly with such extensive candidate lists for both roles. If the Bears are intent on giving their next GM full autonomy over the football operations, then that GM must be afforded an opportunity to see the coaching search in his way, targeting candidates with his own interviewing process. Which means identifying the new GM has to be the most urgent priority. Hopefully by this time next week, the Bears will have found a path to the end of that search and will be ready to intensify their hunt for a new coach.

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‘Nobody likes it’: Orioles’ Trey Mancini responds after Aaron Judge, Yankees take aim at Camden Yards’ left field wall

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‘Nobody likes it’: Orioles’ Trey Mancini responds after Aaron Judge, Yankees take aim at Camden Yards’ left field wall

Asked about comments from New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone and outfielder Aaron Judge about Camden Yards’ new left field wall, Trey Mancini, the longest-tenured Oriole, acknowledged it’s not the first time he’s heard such complaints from visiting hitters.

“Nobody likes it,” Mancini said with a laugh. “No hitters like it, myself included.”

Both Boone and Judge were critical of the Orioles’ changes to their iconic ballpark after Tuesday’s 5-4 victory, in which Judge homered twice but lost a potential third home run on a ball that would have left every other ballpark, as well as Camden Yards a year ago. Judge called the changes, which featured moving the left field wall back nearly 30 feet and increasing its height by more than five feet to reduce the ease of homering to that portion of the ballpark, a “travesty.”

“It looks like a create-a-park now,” Judge told reporters, with Boone adding, “Build-your-own-park got him.”

Entering Wednesday, Judge’s lost home run is one of six balls hit by visitors that would have likely left Camden Yards with the ballpark’s prior dimensions, according to tracking from The Baltimore Sun. The Yankees were responsible for half of those in the previous two days; no visiting player had cleared the wall entering Wednesday’s game.

Mancini has twice lost a home run to the new wall, christening it with a double off the padding during Baltimore’s first homestand. The Orioles have lost eight home runs to the wall, with Ryan Mountcastle, Austin Hays and Anthony Santander managing to hit balls over it.

As he and other Orioles hitters have done since plans for the wall were first reported this offseason, Mancini repeatedly noted that “it is what it is.” Mountcastle, like Judge, has hit a ball that only stayed in because it was hit at Camden Yards, a blast hit off the very top of the new wall. Mancini said the players are able to laugh about such things, knowing it’s out of their control.

“There’s nothing we can do to change it,” Mancini said. “It’s nothing you can be thinking about when you’re up at the plate. But it doesn’t make it any less tough when you hit a ball that you think should definitely be a homer.”

Tuesday’s comments mark the second time this month New York has been involved in ballpark dimensions discourse. After Gleyber Torres’ walk-off home run May 8 over the short right field porch at Yankee Stadium, Texas Rangers manager Chris Woodward said the ball would have been “an easy out in 99% of ballparks. … He just happened to hit it in a Little League ballpark.” In response, Boone quipped Woodward’s “math is off” because there are 30 parks, meaning 99% wouldn’t be possible.

Since Yankee Stadium opened in 2009, Camden Yards is the only major league venue where more home runs have been hit.

Orioles manager Brandon Hyde, though, didn’t take a shot when Boone critiqued his team’s home park, saying he would “take the high road.” He referenced comments from Minnesota Twins manager Rocco Baldelli about how the changes to Camden Yards require right-handed hitters to, as Hyde put it, “become true hitters.”

“Before, fly balls to left field were homers, and it was really unfair a lot of times,” Hyde said. “It’s just playing more fair than before.”

The Orioles’ hitters, though, will naturally be affected by it more than those of any other team, so comments like Judge’s and Boone’s fall somewhat flat to Mancini. The changes came at a poor time for Mancini, who is a potential free agent and whose future earnings depend on a strong 2022 season.

“We play half our games here, so …,” Mancini said. “I know that [Judge’s] ball probably should be a homer, but yeah, we’ve had quite a few, too, that should have been. Like I said, we play half our games here, so not great as a right-handed hitter.

“It’s still our job to go out there and play, so complaining about it’s not going to help us out. But that doesn’t mean we necessarily like it, either.”

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Biden invokes Defense Production Act for formula shortage

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Biden invokes Defense Production Act for formula shortage

By ZEKE MILLER and KEVIN FREKING

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday invoked the Defense Production Act to speed production of infant formula and authorized flights to import supply from overseas, as he faces mounting political pressure over a domestic shortage caused by the safety-related closure of the country’s largest formula manufacturing plant.

The Defense Production Act order requires suppliers of formula manufacturers to fulfill orders from those companies before other customers, in an effort to eliminate production bottlenecks. Biden is also authorizing the Defense Department to use commercial aircraft to fly formula supplies that meet federal standards from overseas to the U.S., in what the White House is calling “Operation Fly Formula.”

Supplies of baby formula across the country have been severely curtailed in recent weeks after a February recall by Abbott Nutrition exacerbated ongoing supply chain disruptions among formula makers, leaving fewer options on store shelves and increasingly anxious parents struggling to find nutrition for their children.

The announcement comes two days after the Food and Drug Administration said it was streamlining its review process to make it easier for foreign manufacturers to begin shipping more formula into the U.S.

In a letter Wednesday to the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, Biden directed the agencies to work with the Pentagon to identify overseas supply of formula that meets U.S. standards over the next week, so that chartered Defense Department flights can swiftly fly it to the U.S.

“Imports of baby formula will serve as a bridge to this ramped-up production,” Biden wrote.

Regulators said Monday that they’d reached a deal to allow Abbott Nutrition to restart its Sturgis, Michigan, plant, the nation’s largest formula plant, which has been closed since February due to contamination issues. The company must overhaul its safety protocols and procedures before resuming production.

After getting the FDA’s OK, Abbott said it will take eight to ten weeks before new products begin arriving in stores. The company didn’t set a timeline to restart manufacturing.

The White House actions come as the Democratic-led House is expected to approve two bills Wednesday addressing the baby formula shortage as lawmakers look to show progress on what has become a frightening development for many families.

One bill expected to have wide bipartisan support would give the secretary of the Department of Agriculture the ability to issue a narrow set of waivers in the event of a supply disruption. The goal is to give participants in an assistance program commonly known as WIC the ability to use vouchers to purchase formula from any producer rather than be limited to one brand that may be unavailable. The WIC program accounts for about half of infant formula sales in the U.S.

The other measure, a $28 million emergency spending bill to boost resources at the Food and Drug Administration, is expected to have less bipartisan support and it’s unclear whether the Senate will take it up.

“This is throwing more FDA staff at a problem that needs more production, not more FDA staff,” said Rep. Bill Huizenga, R-Mich.

Rep. Rosa DeLauro, the Democratic chair of the House Appropriations Committee, said the money would increase FDA staffing to boost inspections of domestic and international suppliers, prevent fraudulent products from getting onto store shelves and acquire better data on the marketplace.

Abbott’s voluntary recall was triggered by four illnesses reported in babies who had consumed powdered formula from its plant. All four infants were hospitalized with a rare type of bacterial infection and two died.

After a six-week inspection, FDA investigators published a list of problems in March, including lax safety and sanitary standards and a history of bacterial contamination in several parts of the plant. Under Monday’s agreement, Abbott must regularly consult with an outside safety expert to restart and maintain production.

Chicago-based Abbott has emphasized that its products have not been directly linked to the bacterial infections in children. Samples of the bacteria found at its plant did not match the strains collected from two babies by federal investigators.

But FDA officials pushed back on that reasoning Monday on a call with reporters — their first time publicly addressing the company’s argument. FDA staffers noted they were unable to collect bacterial strains from two of the four patients, limiting their chances of finding a match.

“Right from the get-go we were limited in our ability to determine with a causal link whether the product was linked to these four cases because we only had sequences on two,” FDA’s food director Susan Mayne said.

Fixing the violations uncovered at Abbott’s plant will take time, according to former FDA officials. Companies need to exhaustively clean the facility and equipment, retrain staff, repeatedly test and document there is no contamination.

As part of the FDA’s new import policy, regulators said companies would need to provide documentation of their factory’s inspections.

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The Offer On Paramount+ Episodes 6: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations

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The Offer On Paramount+ Episodes 6: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations

The offer episode 6 breaths of air on May 19 on Paramount+. The show is a limited miniseries about the making and creation of the classic and the biggest gangster film series of all the Godfathers by the legendary filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola.

The Godfather is a hit movie about the Italian-American New York Mafia of the time and went ahead to achieve enormous success with multiple Academy Awards and golden globes, among many-many others.

This monumental movie series was also a paramount production. The offer majorly falls under the genres of biography and drama. There is a lot of speculation and build-up for episode 6 of the series.

When And Where To Watch It

The offer will premier on Paramount+ anytime after 3 AM Eastern on May 19, 2022. its IMDb rating is 8.5.

1652912744 302 The Offer On Paramount Episodes 6 May 19 Release Time

About The Miniseries

The series follows Albert S. Ruddy, a Canadian writer, producer, behind-the-scenes developer, and maker of The Godfather. The movie series is taken from the 1969 book of the same name by Mario Puzo, a New York bestseller of its time.

Puzo did the adoption himself and the director Francis Ford Coppola and others. The series has real-life characters who made the movie happen. It includes Ruddy, Robert Evans (the paramount studio chief), Francis Ford Coppola (the director), Charles Bluhdorn (owner of Paramount), Barry Lapidus (not a real person; a rival), Joe Colombo (the head of the Colombo crime family; one of the five families of the Italian-American Mafia), Bettye McCartt (an American talent manager), Mario Puzo (the writer), among various others.

The series follows these characters and their struggle to create the movie; Ruddy and his determination and vision make him a wonderful protagonist to watch. He, along with Evans,

Coppola and Puzo put up with just about everything to make this happen. The process was long, and there were ups and downs. With casting struggles to literal threats to life from the Italian-American crime syndicate. Ruddy, along with his wife Francoise, was even shot at, other studios tried to buy the rights, among many others, yet they still succeeded in creating the movie. There were a lot of times when they rarely made the movie, but it was these brave and talented people who made it happen, and this series is their story and their struggle created masterfully by Micheal L. Tolkien.

What Could Happen In Episode 6?

Since Ruddy is getting a lot of attention and publicity with the Italian-American Mafia, it is bound to unsettle Paramount, Not only that, but Joseph “Crazy Joe” Gallo would send some message to Ruddy. This is not Ruddy’s only problem, as Congressman Mario Biaggi creates problems. And it is about time for the film shooting to start.

Who Is All To Expect?

All of the main characters, including the recurring characters, appear for this episode. The series has a gigantic star cast, with about twenty-eight members in almost every episode.

The post The Offer On Paramount+ Episodes 6: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations appeared first on Gizmo Story.

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