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Fisher: Dartmouth under fire after canceling live event over Antifa threats

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Fisher: Dartmouth under fire after canceling live event over Antifa threats

Dartmouth College canceled a planned in-person appearance by conservative journalist Andy Ngo Thursday night in response to threats of violence from the left-wing activists who call themselves Antifa.

Now a pro-free-speech watchdog group says it is investigating the liberal college’s handling of the event.

Ngo is best known for his aggressive coverage of violence committed by groups on the political left like Antifa. He has been the victim of physical attacks and threats as a result. Ngo and former Antifa activist Gabe Nadales were scheduled to discuss extremism in America Thursday night on the Hanover, N.H., campus. The event was hosted by the Dartmouth College Republicans and conservative activists at Turning Point USA.

A college security officer told a reporter for InsideSources covering the event that it had been canceled and was moved to an online appearance. When asked why, he replied, “That’s a decision above my pay grade.”

Dartmouth College’s Associate Vice President for Communications Diana Lawrence said the event was moved online after it became clear it could not be held safely in person.

“In light of concerning information from Hanover police regarding safety issues, similar concerns expressed by the College Republican leadership and challenges with the student organization’s ability to staff a large public event and communicate effectively (including dissemination of the visitor policy and a prohibition on bags in the building), the college has requested that the ‘Extremism in America’ panel be moved online,” Lawrence said.

Ngo noted the irony of Dartmouth’s decision. “An event on violent extremism was threatened by violent extremists. It’s a cliche,” he told InsideSources. “Why did the college wait until two hours before the event to drop the ultimatum on organizers and speakers? Dartmouth College’s decision actually gives a blueprint for extremists to shut down future events.”

Now the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) says it is investigating the incident.

“Threats of violence are never an appropriate response to speech you oppose and must not dictate who may speak, or what may be said, on a college campus. Universities should not reward those who threaten violence by canceling controversial speakers,” said FIRE Program Officer Zach Greenberg. “We must remain vigilant against universities citing safety concerns as a pretext to censor unpopular expression, and must ensure that those seeking to impose a “heckler’s veto” cannot succeed in doing so.”

In the days leading up to the event, members of Antifa organized a counterprotest, with some making threats to stop Ngo at all costs.

“When you enter our home you play by our rules, not yours,” the Northeast Antifa social media account posted. “New England is anti-fascists, and we will hold that line till death.”

The Green Mountain John Brown Gun Club stated online it “called up reserves” of Antifa super soldiers to be on hand for the event. A member of a Portland, Ore., Antifa group, Jonathan Dylan Chase, offered money for anyone who managed to assault Ngo during his Dartmouth appearance.

Antifa is a decentralized organization of people who claim to be anti-fascists and has been at the heart of violent street protests for years, clashing with both innocent political protestors and aggressive white supremacists along the way.

Ngo has been accused of serving as a propagandist for the Proud Boys in exchange for protection at the protests, something he has denied. Ngo was assaulted by Antifa protesters in 2019 in an incident in which he was punched repeatedly and hospitalized.

Lawrence said the college strives to make sure all viewpoints are heard on campus, so long as it can be done safely.

“Dartmouth prizes and defends the right of free speech and the freedom of the individual to make their own disclosures, while at the same time recognizing that such freedom exists in the context of the law and in responsibility for one’s own actions,” Lawrence said. “The exercise of these rights must not deny the same rights to any other individual.”


Damien Fisher is a freelance journalist. This column was provided by InsideSources.

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WCHA Final Faceoff returning for Ridder in 2023, 2024

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WCHA Final Faceoff returning for Ridder in 2023, 2024

Minnesota will play host to the next two WCHA Final Faceoff championship tournaments, the school announced Wednesday. The 2023 event is scheduled for March 3-4, 2023, at Ridder Arena.

The Gophers won the regular-season WCHA championship last season before being edged by eventual national champion Ohio State in the conference tournament final at Ridder.

The 2025 NCAA Frozen Four is scheduled to be played at Ridder Arena, as well.

GOALIES TO USA CAMP

Gophers junior Makayla Pahl and freshman Skylar Vetter have been selected to attend the 2022 USA Hockey National Goaltending Camp in Plymouth, Mich. They will join 27 other men’s and women’s goaltenders for the May 19-22 camp at USA Hockey Arena.

Pahl recently completed her best season at the U, posting a 9-1-0 record with a 1.70 goals-against average and .934 save percentage in 15 games. Lakeville’s Vetter appeared in 11 games in her first collegiate season, going 6-2-0 record with a 1.57 GAA and a .926 save percentage.

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New York State Accuses Amazon of Discrimination, Just the Latest Conflict Between the Company and New Yorkers

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best amazon prime day deals 2021

best amazon prime day deals 2021

New York State is accusing Amazon of violating discrimination laws, alleging the corporation denies appropriate accommodations for pregnant and disabled workers.

The complaint, filed by the state’s Division of Human Rights and announced in a statement by Gov. Kathy Hochul, accuses Amazon of forcing its warehouse workers to take unpaid medical leave instead of adjusting their duties, as required by state law. Amazon has 39,000 employees working in 23 New York facilities, according to the state.

The state maintains that Amazon employs “accommodation consultants,” who make recommendations on how to modify duties for disabled employees, but the company empowers its managers to override those recommendations. In one case, the state claims, a pregnant worker was forced to continue lifting heavy boxes despite having asked for an accommodation. The request was denied and the worker was injured. A further request for accommodation for the injury was also denied, forcing the worker to take unpaid leave. Amazon did not respond to a request for comment.

Amazon’s reputation as an unsafe workplace

Amazon has struggled with a reputation for being an unsafe employer, and according to one union-sponsored study of government data, its warehouse employees suffer injuries at twice the rate of workers at non-Amazon facilities. The injuries are based in part on the company’s productivity quotas, which can demand employees skip breaks or lunch hours, and have prompted California to pass a law restricting them. Amazon says the high number of injuries were in part the result of a rapid increase in employment during the Covid-19 pandemic, and that it spent $300 million on worker safety in 2021.

Workplace safety was one of the rallying points for the Amazon Labor Union, the independent union that organized an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island, New York, and the state’s lawsuit is just the latest friction point between Amazon and New Yorkers.

Along with the unionization effort, which succeeded after similar attempts failed in other states, New York City notably rejected Amazon’s bid to build a second headquarters in Queens, New York. Queens and northern Virginia were selected after a highly publicized and lengthy search process, and while many cities were eager to shower Amazon with tax breaks for the privilege of hosting its offices, New Yorkers balked at $3 billion in incentives and the potential for increased traffic, rent increases and gentrification. (Despite noisily severing its deal with the city, Amazon has since stealthily leased huge amounts of office space while hiring thousands.)

Hochul, the former Lt. Governor who stepped in after the resignation of Andrew Cuomo, is running for election as a Democrat this fall. An upstate moderate, she is looking to make inroads with progressives in New York City. Given the city’s contentious relationship with Amazon, it seems likely that taking aim at the tech giant will only help her standing among the city’s liberals.

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Law & Order: SVU Season 23 Finale: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations

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Law & Order: SVU Season 23 Finale: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, the first and longest-running spin-off of Law & Order that started in 1999 is coming with its final episode on 19th May and will leave viewers wanting more. Episode 22, titled “a final call at Forlini’s Bar,” will be released on NBC this week, concluding the season that premiered last September.

Season 23 stars Mariska Hargitay, Kelli Giddish, Ice-T, Peter Scanavino, Aime Donna Kelly, Demore Barnes, Blake Morris, Peter Hargrave, Lou Martini Jr., Stephen Wallem, and Jamie Gray Hyder in primary roles, though Barnes and Hyder have said their goodbyes to the series in the initial episode of the season already.

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit – What Is The Series All About? 

The Special Victims Unit is the elite force of NYPD that mainly tackles and investigates darker crimes than most – sexual assault, child molestation, child abuse, and domestic violence. Considering how heavy these cases tend to be, the series focuses on the mental and psychological effects of it on the department detectives and their lives as well.

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit is by far the longest-running US primetime series and the only one ongoing up to this date since its premiere in 1999.

The series is produced by Dick Wolf’s Wolf Entertainment production house and Universal Television, and Warren Leight is the present showrunner. Mariska Hargitay, who plays the main character Captain Olivia Benson, is currently an executive producer.

Episode 22: When And Where To Watch It?

Episode 22 of Law & Order: Special Victim Unit, which has added up to 514 episodes since the series started, will be airing on 19th May, Thursday at NBC, at 9 PM ET. The series would be available to stream on fuboTV, Hulu, Peacock Premium, and Amazon Prime Videos.

1652898824 928 Law Order SVU Season 23 Finale May 19 Release

Episode 22: What Can We Expect?

The last episode of the season, directed by Juan Campanella, has the squad confronting another problem. The synopsis for the episode says that the unit is providing support and protection to a domestic violence victim. However, the trial holds a twist.

That is to say, the episode is sure to be a roller coaster of turns, and our favorite squad needs to go above and beyond to finally get a rest (God knows they need a break!).

It is to remain whether the people involved in the case get their due justice and if the season ends up positively.

What Comes Next?

Yes, it’s a goodbye for our Special Victims Unit Squad, but it’s not forever! Luckily for us, NBC has already renewed the series for 3 seasons in 2020, which means, for the time being, we have confirmation that we are getting the next season, 24, in some time. Mariska Hargitay is not going anywhere, and neither are we.

The post Law & Order: SVU Season 23 Finale: May 19 Release, Time And Plot Speculations appeared first on Gizmo Story.

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