Connect with us

News

Rosario: A conversation with now ex-Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo

Published

on

Rosario: A conversation with now ex-Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo

I asked a veteran Minneapolis cop of color recently what he thought of Medaria Arradondo’s tenure as police chief.

“He underwhelmed,” said the cop. “I expected more.”

I got a different take from another police officer I know, also of color.

“He was good. He tried,” said the officer. “With the police union and political resistance, no one person can reform a culture that in many cases needs to change.”

And that pretty much sums up the major camps of views on Arradondo, 54, a South Minneapolis native, 32-year police veteran and divorced father of two who announced last month that he would not seek a third term as chief. His last day in office was Jan.15.

Most newly appointed police chiefs in recent years, particularly those of color, have been promoted or elevated to the top in response to high-profile police-involved shootings, excessive-force incidents or other crises that have further frayed trust between police and communities of color. It is not that surprising that a spate of them — from Dallas to Seattle to Sacramento to now Minneapolis — have left the job in the past two years.

But arguably few have faced more challenges in a short time — the George Floyd murder, a destructive riot, a rise in violent crime, a manpower shortage and a wave of cops retiring early or leaving the force in the midst of a pandemic — than “Chief Rondo.”

He became the first Black chief in the department’s 155-year history following the July 2017 fatal shooting of Justine Ruszczyk, a white woman, by a cop of Somali descent. Public outrage and demands for accountability and substantial police reform both locally and nationally reached an unprecedented crescendo in May 2020 after the world witnessed Derek Chauvin snuffing out the life of Floyd at the corner of 38th Street and Chicago Avenue — just a few blocks from where Arradondo grew up and first dreamed of becoming a cop in his hometown.

If Chauvin and the MPD became the face of police brutality in America, Arradondo became at that moment the face of the progressively minded police chief in America. He reached out personally to Floyd’s relatives. He knelt in reverence and lowered his hat as Floyd’s casket passed by. He testified against one of his own at the Chauvin murder trial and he may potentially do so again in St. Paul in the federal civil rights trial of the three other former Minneapolis cops charged in Floyd’s death.

He also tussled with a city council that resisted his efforts to hire more police officers and that also backed a controversial plan to essentially eliminate the police department in its present form and replace it with a vaguely detailed Department of Public Safety. A majority of Minneapolis voters rejected that plan at the ballot box in November, by a 56 percent to 44 percent margin. Some critics of the chief lambasted him for “campaigning in uniform” and partly blamed his public opposition to the proposed change for its failure at the ballot box.

He has received some praise for, among other steps, revising rules limiting high-speed pursuit chases that have resulted in deaths, eliminating low-level marijuana police stings, banning neck- and choke-hold restraints, and calling for a need to tweak union contract and arbitration agreements that in his view make it difficult to discipline officers.

Yet some Black community members and activists who aggressively lobbied for Arradondo to be named chief four years ago have expressed disappointment that he did not do enough to rein in or boot out problem cops like Chauvin. They point out the group of SWAT cops seen and heard on body-camera videos during the riots “hunting” for protesters in an unmarked white van. In one incident captured on surveillance video, they fired rubber bullets at and kicked and punched a protester, Jaleel Stallings, a St. Paul truck driver and Army veteran, after Stallings fired his licensed firearm at the van in self-defense. Stallings, who said he was not aware that the shooters inside the vehicle were cops and feared they might be white-supremacist vigilantes, was charged with several counts of attempted murder. He was acquitted in October after a jury trial. He has filed a civil lawsuit against a city that has paid out a combined $47 million alone in out-of-court settlements in the Ruszczyk and Floyd deaths.

Although an internal affairs probe was launched, none of the cops in the Stallings case have reportedly faced any discipline. There are also underway separate city and federal civil rights probes into whether the Minneapolis Police Department historically engaged and still now engages in a pattern of discrimination and excessive force. The results of those probes, including a possible consent decree, could lead to substantial reform changes.

But Arradondo’s popularity with most residents, particularly those who live in neighborhoods most affected by a surge in homicides not seen in a generation and other violent crime, is without question.

A Star Tribune poll conducted last September found that more than half of Minneapolitan respondents had an unfavorable view of the scandal-scarred department. Yet, only 22 percent had an unfavorable view of Arradondo.

News

Tim Anderson’s 3-run homer punctuates the Chicago White Sox’s doubleheader sweep of the New York Yankees

Published

on

Tim Anderson’s 3-run homer punctuates the Chicago White Sox’s doubleheader sweep of the New York Yankees

Johnny Cueto was terrific in Game 1 of Sunday’s doubleheader against the New York Yankees.

Michael Kopech was even better in Game 2 as the Chicago White Sox swept the twinbill, beating the Yankees 3-1 and 5-0.

“What a day,” Sox manager Tony La Russa said.

Cueto allowed six hits in six-plus scoreless innings at Yankee Stadium but did not factor in the decision. The Sox gave up a late lead only to respond with two in the ninth for the Game 1 win.

Kopech retired the first 17 batters in Game 2. Rob Brantly broke up the perfect game with a two-out double in the sixth.

“I felt like everything was working today,” said Kopech, who lowered his ERA to 1.29. “The first time this season that’s been the case. It was nice to go out there and feel confident with every pitch I threw.

“I try to be perfect every time and I know that’s never going to be the case, but I feel like if I can hold on to that little bit as deep as I can into the game, then I’ll be in a good position. And I was able to do that for a lot of the day.”

Kopech — who returned from the paternity leave list after the birth Friday of his second son, Vander — allowed one hit with six strikeouts and two walks in seven scoreless innings.

“Kopech made so many great pitches and mixed them up great,” La Russa said. “He had so much command. When you see that, I don’t care how good the hitters are, they’re going to have a tough time.”

The Sox scored five with two outs in the eighth on RBI hits by Andrew Vaughn and Reese McGuire and a three-run home run by shortstop Tim Anderson — his third hit of the game.

“This guy is as good as anybody playing at that position and one of the best players in baseball,” La Russa said of Anderson.

Vaughn came through with two outs, singling to center against Jonathan Loáisiga to bring home José Abreu. McGuire followed with another single, bringing in Adam Engel.

Anderson — who was booed throughout the night by Yankees fans after Saturday’s words with Josh Donaldson and a bench-clearing incident — then homered against Miguel Castro.

“Tim’s going to show up every day ready to play and lead this team,” Kopech said. “And he did that again tonight.”

In the first game, AJ Pollock put the Sox ahead in the ninth with a leadoff homer to left on a 1-0 fastball from Yankees reliever Aroldis Chapman.

“You’ve got to stay short to him,” Pollock said. “He’s got some good velocity, good cut on his fastball, so just trying to hit a line drive and it worked out.”

Vaughn drew a one-out walk, moved to second on a wild pitch and to third on a passed ball before scoring on a double by Engel, making it 3-1. Liam Hendriks struck out two in a perfect ninth for his 13th save.

It was a nice bounce-back performance by the Sox after the Yankees tied the score at 1 in the eighth when Aaron Judge homered to left on an 0-2 sinker against reliever Kendall Graveman.

The Yankees put two on with one out in the inning, but Graveman rebounded to get Donaldson to fly out to center and Aaron Hicks to pop out to third.

“Most times when you do that, (you) lose your concentration and there is another run on the board,” La Russa said of Graveman. “He got the zero afterward, gave us a chance to win.”

Cueto put the Sox in an excellent position early.

“I had good command of all my pitches today and they had very good movement and I was able to locate them up and down the zone,” Cueto, who was receiving fluids in the aftermath of Game 1, said in a statement. “That was the key to keep the Yankees off-balanced today.”

The Sox went ahead 1-0 on an RBI single by Yasmani Grandal in the fourth.

And Cueto kept “dealing,” as Pollock said. He struck out five and walked two in the 95-pitch outing.

“He’s been awesome for us,” Pollock said. “Works fast and has all sorts of pitches to get them off-balanced. Shimmy shake (delivery). It’s awesome to play behind him. It’s great having him out there for the first game of a doubleheader because of the tone he just set for us.”

Cueto has pitched 12 scoreless innings, the third-longest streak for a Sox starter at the beginning of his tenure with the team since 1974, according to STATS. Ken Brett pitched 17 scoreless innings in 1976 and Jack McDowell went 13 innings in 1987.

Cueto allowed two hits and struck out seven in six scoreless innings against the Royals.

“He’s an artist,” La Russa said. “It’s fun to watch him pitch a game. And that’s what he’s been, an outstanding starting pitcher, because he gives you a different look four times in a game.”

Cueto exited after allowing two singles to begin the seventh. Joe Kelly struck out Marwin Gonzalez, picked off Hicks at second and struck out Jose Trevino to maintain the one-run lead.

“Kelly was just perfect,” La Russa said.

The Yankees got the run in the eighth, but Pollock came though with the big hit in the ninth to give the Sox what La Russa called a “hard-earned” victory.

The Sox made it two-for-two Sunday with more stellar pitching and clutch hitting.

“It just shows we have that in us,” Vaughn said, “and we’ve just got to keep going and keep building off of it.”

()

Continue Reading

News

With St. Paul community center ailing, Keith Ellison’s office demands reforms at Cameroon Community organization

Published

on

With St. Paul community center ailing, Keith Ellison’s office demands reforms at Cameroon Community organization

With high hopes and no small amount of fanfare, leaders of the Twin Cities’ Cameroonian community pooled their resources in late 2013 and purchased a 57,000-square-foot, two-level office building in St. Paul’s Bandana Square for the bargain price of $200,000.

It was a deal by any stretch of the imagination. The future MinCam Community Center off Energy Park Drive carried an assessed market value of $3 million, at least on paper, though it came with a requirement that the association pay off some $100,000 in outstanding property taxes.

But the community center has been rife with infighting and dysfunction, involving legal action and public accusations of mismanagement.

Last week officials with Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison’s office announced they had stepped into the fray as the state’s charity regulator.

The attorney general’s new 16-page “assurance of discontinuance” agreement, signed by a representative of the Minnesota Cameroon Community and filed in Ramsey County District Court, seeks to hold the association accountable for “inattentiveness and governance violations” that have “allowed this important community asset to fall into disrepair,” according to a statement from Ellison’s office.

According to documents from the attorney general’s office, the property tax debt ballooned to $172,000. A broken boiler went unattended for months, causing what some fear is irreparable building damage over the course of a winter. Water mains burst in February 2021. The building’s property insurance lapsed in 2017, and energy bills mounted.

Community center leaders can’t account for all of the funds collected for property tax payments and building repair, according to the attorney general’s office. Questions over who truly leads MinCam — its board of directors, its president, the representative assembly, the general assembly or the community center management team — flared into a legal dispute over who had the right to call elections in the summer of 2020.

Among the requirements imposed under the agreement with the attorney general’s office, MinCam cannot solicit further donations without first registering as a charity with the attorney general’s office, which leaders had failed to do.

MinCam must restructure its leadership so that a singular board controls the business and affairs of the organization. It must also maintain and comply with internal financial management practices developed in consultation with professionals, and adopt a conflict-of-interest, whistleblower and document-retention policy.

“MCC’s directors and officers are further required to properly maintain all books and records of the organization and adopt policies to ensure that funds are properly spent on the purposes for which they were given,” reads a statement from Ellison’s office.

A request for comment was not returned Friday by an attorney for MinCam. The listed phone number for the community center’s was out of service Friday.

Continue Reading

News

Yankees drop pair of games in doubleheader with White Sox

Published

on

Yankees drop pair of games in doubleheader with White Sox

On an uncomfortably hot and sticky day for the Yankees’ and White Sox’s Sunday doubleheader in the Bronx, the home team played two fittingly lethargic games. The Yankees dropped both of them, losing back-to-back games for the first time since April 10 and 11, their third and fourth games of the year.

The second game of the doubleheader saw Tim Anderson get revenge on a fan base that had puzzlingly booed him all game. On Saturday, Anderson was mockingly called “Jackie” by Yankees’ third baseman Josh Donaldson. On Sunday, he hit an opposite field home run to bring the White Sox a 5-0 victory.

Anderson’s three-run silencer left no doubt that the Yankees would go to bed winless, and many of their fans would hit their pillows with a palpable rage over their number one enemy of the day having the nerve to play well amid their hatred.

Aaron Judge stepped to the plate in the eighth inning of game one and with one wave of his mighty bat, briefly gave the Yankees some hope. Judge’s solo home run tied the game, incited M-V-P chants at Yankee Stadium, and helped his team get off the mat, but AJ Pollock matched him with a solo shot of his own in the next inning. Pollock’s jack gave the White Sox a late lead that blossomed into a 3-1 Chicago win and, with the game-clinching shot coming off Aroldis Chapman, invited more questions about who the Yankees’ closer should be moving forward.

In addition to giving up a poorly timed home run, Chapman also threw a pitch to the backstop, had to be visited by the training staff after throwing a pitch, and failed to get a single swing and miss on his once untouchable fastball. When he left the game after Adam Engel put an RBI insurance run double into the left field corner, Chapman was serenaded by boos on his way to the dugout, where Judge was waiting for him at the top step with an encouraging pat on the butt.

“He’s not been as fine with his command,” Boone said of the struggling southpaw. “He’s just not quite as sharp as we’ve seen him. He was getting some treatment on his Achilles. When he was moving around, he wasn’t moving around great. But he wanted the ball. Today, to me he didn’t look great on his legs, so I think that was probably an issue today.”

The Yankees started their double dip by getting blanked by Johnny Cueto, a wonderful pitcher who’s also years removed from his prime. Cueto twisted and turned his way through six innings, five strikeouts and roughly one million different wind ups. The Yankees mustered six hits against him — all of which were singles — and got zero runs.

The final two of those singles did knock Cueto out of the game with no outs in the seventh inning. Trailing by one run at the time, the Yankees were very much still in the game. Cueto’s replacement, the fiery Joe Kelly, shut that down fairly quickly.

Kelly struck out his first hitter, Marwin Gonzalez, on four pitches. During the next at-bat, he picked Aaron Hicks off of second base. Hicks tried to make a break for third while Kelly wasn’t looking, likely anticipating that the reliever would start his delivery during the mad dash. Instead, Kelly simply stepped off the mound, realized that Hicks was in no man’s land, and tossed the ball to second base for an easy out. Hicks was the second Yankee to get picked off, joining Isiah Kiner-Falefa, who Cueto picked off of first in the second inning.

“Almost had him timed up,” Boone lamented after the game.

The squandered opportunity in the seventh looked like it would be the Yankees’ best scoring chance of the day, but Judge’s ability to transform things in a single swing changed that pretty emphatically before the White Sox landed their counter punches.

Hicks’ rally-killing pickoff brings more ammunition to the people calling for him to be benched. Entering Sunday’s action, Hicks was hitting .200 with an on-base percentage much higher than his slugging percentage. His 20 hits included just one double and one home run, and in his previous 15 games coming into Sunday, he was in a vicious 3-for-40 (.075) slump. In the first game of the doubleheader, he did go 2-for-4, but also popped up on the infield with the game tied in the eighth inning.

While he’s still taking a lot of walks, and is tied for the team-lead in stolen bases, Hicks is a tough sell for many fans, especially the ones advocating for the Joey Gallo-Aaron Judge-Giancarlo Stanton outfield to be a more regular occurrence.

White Sox’s closer Liam Hendriks, who was very critical of Donaldson in some pregame comments, had no trouble at all during his Sunday outing.

The Yankees cannot relate.

In the second game, White Sox’s starter Michael Kopech skated comfortably through the first five innings. He maintained perfection until Rob Brantly — the catcher who was added to the active roster on Sunday morning and arrived at the stadium during the first game — doubled with two outs in the sixth to become the Yankees’ first base runner of the game. Kopech finished his night with seven eye-popping innings, one hit, and no runs on his ledger.

Luis Severino displayed admirable problem solving skills all night. He allowed hitters to reach base in every inning from the second to seventh, but kept any of them from reaching home plate. His final line showed eight hits in seven innings of work but zero runs. It wasn’t until Jonathan Loaisiga entered in the eighth that the dam finally broke. Andrew Vaughn and Reese McGuire’s two-out singles gave Chicago their first two runs, and Anderson provided the final three off of Miguel Castro.

At the end of the unbearably hot day, the Yankees had two losses, a smarting wound from Anderson and multiple questions about their bullpen, as both Chapman and Loaisiga have been less than stellar all year and did nothing to rectify that on Sunday.

()

Continue Reading

Trending