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Wings use dominant third quarter to blow by Lynx

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Wings use dominant third quarter to blow by Lynx

“Exactly right.”

Lynx coach Cheryl Reeve didn’t hold back on what she thinks of her team’s 1-6 record to start the season after another loss on Saturday.

Minnesota fell to Dallas 94-78 when the Lynx turned a halftime lead into a 15-point deficit after the third quarter.

“There’s always a quarter,” Reeve said. “Until you find a defensive identity and you play with some toughness, you don’t get out-worked, this is going to be the result.”

It was a tale of two halves for the Lynx. The first quarter ended with Minnesota holding a five-point lead. Though the second quarter wasn’t as strong, the Lynx still went to halftime with a two-point lead.

The third quarter was where everything changed as Dallas’ offense took control.

“For us, we just need to get in the gym and we need to get better together at playing together, moving together and putting in the effort to get stops,” starting forward Jessica Shepard said.

Minnesota was outscored by 17 points in the third quarter alone. The Wings’ 36 points in that frame tied the most points against in any quarter this season for the Lynx. On May 10, the Lynx surrendered 36 points in the second quarter in a loss to Indiana.

The biggest trend leading to Dallas’ surge in the third quarter was a sudden turnaround in shooting percentage. For much of the first half, the Wings had a shooting percentage around 35 percent. As the fourth quarter expired, they had ballooned that percentage to just under 50 percent for the game — 46.6 percent.

They were able to take so many shots because of the Lynx faltered on the defensive glass.

While the Lynx got just four offensive rebounds, the Wings took control off their own shots and collected 15 offensive boards. Even on a night when Minnesota got 20 defensive rebounds on its own, Dallas nearly met that total in its favor on the offensive glass.

“We talked about that it would be more challenging to go get rebounds, but we certainly wanted to keep them off the glass,” Reeve said. “That was a priority, probably couldn’t tell.”

Things remained mostly even in the fourth quarter, but the damage had already been done in the third as Minnesota was thwarted by Dallas’ quick-paced attack and explosive offense.

On the other end, Minnesota didn’t capitalize on its own shots, missing points from much of the offense. All five starters had at least 12 points in the loss, but it still all came back to defensive cohesion.

“Honestly, it’s trust, and helping each other,” starting guard Moriah Jefferson said. “We have to make sure we’re in our schemes … that comes from trust, that comes from chemistry. We’re going to be better, I’m going to make sure of that.”

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Fundraising for North Dakota abortion clinic move tops $500K

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Fundraising for North Dakota abortion clinic move tops $500K

FARGO, N.D. — A fundraising campaign to help North Dakota’s sole abortion clinic move a few miles away to Minnesota has raised more than half a million dollars in two days.

The Red River Women’s Clinic in Fargo will have to shut down in 30 days as part of the state’s trigger law that went into effect Friday, when the U.S. Supreme Court removed the constitutional right to abortion.

Tammi Kromenaker, owner and operator of the independent clinic, said Saturday she has secured a location across the river in neighboring Moorhead but stated earlier that she didn’t know how she would fund the move.

A GoFundMe page set up Friday to benefit the transition had raised over $515,000 from more than 6,000 donors as of late Saturday afternoon. The original goal was $20,000.

Abortion is legal in Minnesota and the state’s governor signed an order to help protect people seeking or providing abortions from facing legal action from other states.

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Wisconsin’s Tony Evers looks for boost from anger over abortion

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Wisconsin’s Tony Evers looks for boost from anger over abortion

MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin’s Democratic Gov. Tony Evers hopes to translate anger over the U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade into votes this fall as he vows to fight a 173-year-old state abortion ban, including offering clemency to any doctor convicted and not appointing prosecutors who would enforce the prohibition.

Evers, who won election in the battleground state four years ago by just over 1 percentage point, told The Associated Press ahead of his appearance Saturday at the Wisconsin Democratic Party convention that abortion will energize key independent voters to support him and other Democrats.

“Any time you take half the people in Wisconsin and make them second class citizens, I have to believe there’s going to be a reaction to that,” Evers said.

At a rally Saturday before the convention, Evers said: “I have seven granddaughters who are girls or young women. Yesterday they were made second-class citizens, and that’s (expletive).”

Wisconsin’s governor’s race is expected to be one of the hardest fought in the country this year. It’s a priority for Democrats given the importance of swing state Wisconsin in the 2024 presidential election. Evers is also the only thing standing in the way of the Republican-controlled Legislature. In his first term, he issued more vetoes than any other governor in modern history.

Democrats running to take on Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson will also speak Sunday at the convention in La Crosse. Five Republicans are running for a chance to take on Evers. Wisconsin’s primary is Aug. 9.

About 1,000 people attended the convention that kicked off Saturday night.

Evers told the AP that he feels confident abortion will be a winning issue for his party because polls have consistently shown about 60% of Wisconsin residents support it being legal in most or all cases.

“You can’t ignore the fact that we now have politicians making decisions for women and their health care,” Evers said. “So we’ll be talking about that a lot.”

Evers vowed to do whatever he can to evade the state’s abortion ban that was passed in 1849 but hasn’t been in effect since the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling. That includes supporting lawsuits to overturn it, not appointing district attorneys who would enforce it and offering clemency for doctors convicted under it.

“We’re looking at everything,” he said.

Wisconsin Republican Party Chairman Paul Farrow said Evers’ position on abortion was appealing only to “his activist base and going against the will of the people.” He downplayed the significance of the court’s ruling on the election.

“All they really did yesterday was, 50 years ago an activist bench made a decision that wasn’t constitutional and put that into play, so they’re correcting that,” Farrow said. “Is it causing any change to the political landscape? There is a standard that people have. Republicans know that we’re pro-life.”

In addition to abortion, Evers said his reelection campaign and message to Democrats will focus on successes from his first term, including using federal money to fix roads and support small businesses. Evers said he will also emphasize what’s at stake if Republicans win, “including voter suppression and voting rights.”

Evers is a supporter of Wisconsin’s bipartisan commission that oversees elections, but all of his Republican opponents want to do away with it. Evers also vetoed a series of bills that would make it more difficult to vote absentee in the state.

President Joe Biden carried Wisconsin by about 21,000 votes, an outcome that some Republicans have refused to accept even though it has withstood two recounts, multiple lawsuits, an independent audit and even a review by a conservative group.

Republicans hope to harness unhappiness about gas prices, inflation and crime to knock off Evers.

No governor who was the same party as the sitting president has won election in Wisconsin since 1990. A Marquette University Law School poll this week showed Evers slightly ahead of his Republican challengers, while Johnson was about even with each Democrat running against him.

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Saints’ seven runs enough to put away Buffalo

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Saints’ seven runs enough to put away Buffalo

Eliot Soto went 4 for 5 with three RBIs, and Aaron Sanchez worked in and out of trouble for five innings as the Saints beat the Buffalo Blue Jays, 7-4, on Saturday at Sahlen Field.

Soto’s two-run single in the fourth inning gave St. Paul a 2-0 lead. He scored on Spencer Steer’s one-out single for a 5-3 lead, and his two-out single gave the Saints a 7-3 lead in the ninth.

The Saints have led every game in this six-game series in the eighth inning or later yet take a 2-3 record into Sunday’s series finale, a 12:05 p.m. first pitch.

Michael Helman went 3 for 5 with a pair of solo home runs, and John Andreoli added a solo homer as the Saints beat the first-place team in the International League East Division.

Sanchez (2-0) allowed five hits and five walks in five innings but limited the Blue Jays to three runs. He struck out three. JC Ramirez pitched a scoreless inning, walking two, for his second hold.

Juan Minaya pitched the ninth, giving up a leadoff homer to Samad Taylor, and putting two more on base before retiring Chavez Young on a liner to center to close out the Saints’ second win of the series.

Thomas Hatch (4-4) took the loss, charged with four earned runs on eight hits and a pair of walks. He struck out five.

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