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Why Is Ben Is Back Rated R?

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Ben Is Back Ending Explained

The 2018 drama film Ben is back is a story of a mother trying to help her son who returns from rehab. Holly’s son Ben, an addict, was waiting for her in the driveway as she returned from the church, saying that he was advised to take a trip home.

She was naturally happy but, at the same time, a little concerned about the effect he could have on her other children. Ben got involved in drug dealing and felt guilty for troubling his family when the dealer he used to work for took their dog away.

The movie stars Julia Roberts, Lukas Hedges, and Courtney B. Vance. The critics highly praised their portrayal of their characters, but the movie itself couldn’t do very well in the theatres.

Why Is The Movie Rated R?

Ben is Back, directed by Peter Hedges, is rated R, and advised parental guidance. It has a lot of content that is not suitable for children, and it’s too raw and a little violent. It shows a physical altercation and a punch and talks about sex in return for drugs, opioid addiction, and how it affects the addict’s family. It also talks about death and other dangers of addiction, and there is the usage of foul language.

Why Is Ben Is Back Rated R

What Scenes Are Advised To Keep Away From Children?

Sex and nudity are present to vague extents. Ben, a young man, talks about having some arrangements with his history teacher for drugs (implications of sexual activities); he also talks about how he wakes up with erections after being clean. There is a photo of a girl wearing a camisole where her bosom is evident. The mother also hands her son a cup for his urine sample for drug testing.

There are scenes of violence. One such example can be a surprising scene when an addict bashes into someone’s window.

Alcohol and drugs are also one of the reasons for the rating. The movie is about drug addiction and its dreadful effects on a person’s life, family, and surroundings. There’s mention of heroin and opioid addiction. There’s a scene when Holly goes to a street full of junkies. People are seen injecting themselves with drugs.

The Most Pitiful Scene

Ben mentions how he once almost overdosed and was found lying on the floor with a needle in his hand by his mother and his dog. The description of this scene is very pitiful and involves various mentions that kids should be kept away from.

There are more than 30 uses of the F word, as words like “shit” and damn it is used.

Why Keep A Watch On Children, If They Watch The Movie?

The whole movie is made depressingly; its main motive is to show how sad life turns when one gets addicted and to give the idea about how depressing it can make the lives of an addict’s family.

So, parents should check the kids who watch the movie in the countries where they are allowed to.

The post Why Is Ben Is Back Rated R? appeared first on Gizmo Story.

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Readers & Writers: Choices for young readers for Pride Month

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Readers & Writers: Choices for young readers for Pride Month

It’s the last Sunday of Pride Month, so we’re closing the observance with a young adult gay boys’ rom-com and picture books about children with same-sex parents or grandparents.

“A Little Bit Country” by Brian D. Kennedy (HarperCollins/Balzer + Bray, $17.99)

The words are stuck in my throat. I know how badly Emmett wants to hear them. But I can’t bring myself to say them. Because I’m not sure if they’re true. I like Emmett a lot. More than I ever thought possible. But I can count the number of people I’ve said ‘I love you’ to on one hand. and they’re all family, so I didn’t really have a choice in the matter … With Emmett, love feels too scary.”

This gentle debut by an author who grew up in St. Paul and Mendota Heights is an easy, enjoyable summer read that’s as much a mystery as a story about  Emmett and Luke, who can’t ignore their attraction to one another.

Emmett is from Oak Park, Ill., and can’t wait to get away from home to work for a summer at Wanda World, owned by his country music idol Wanda Jean. (The author admits on his website that one of his “slightly unhealthy obsessions is all things Dolly Parton.”) Emmett hopes his summer as a performer at the amusement park will be the first step in his goal to become country music’s first gay superstar.

Luke, who lives in the Wanda World’s town of Jackson Hollow, Tenn., is weighed down with family obligations and believes he cannot come out as gay because his mother would never forgive him. He hates country music because something happened between his grandmother and Wanda years earlier, and Luke believes that destroyed his family.

The two young men are not sure where their relationship is going since their goals are so different. Emmett urges Luke to come out, but Luke isn’t ready. Still, they meet secretly in Wanda World, amidst the sweet carnival smells and sounds of people having fun. (There is no overt sex in the narrative and it’s handled so delicately even would-be censors won’t find a reason to clutch their pearls.)

After the men discover a stash of songs hidden by Luke’s grandmother, their feelings about country music have to be revised because it seems Wanda Jean might be living a lie.

Kennedy, who lives in New York City with his husband and photogenic dog, will be in person at the Red Balloon Bookshop, 891 Grand Ave., at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 29, to sign books and talk about his novel with guest author Emily J. Taylor. There’ll be special launch party favors at this free program. Space is limited so a ticket is required. Register through June 29, 4:30 p.m., at redballoonbookshop.com. Face coverings are required.

PICTURE BOOKS

“Katy Has two Grampas” by Julie Schanke Lyford and Robert A. Schanke, art by Mariia Luzina (Wise Ink, $18.95)

Book jacket for "Katy Has Two Grampas"

Katy is excited about grandparents day at her school, because she has two grandpas. But she lisps, so she hardly ever talks. Grandpa Bob and Grandpa Jack are two of her favorite people. But when the teacher asks the children to talk about their grandparents, she can’t understand what Katy is saying because of her lisp, and she thinks the little girl is talking about a grandma and a grandpa. Katy’s big sister takes her to the teacher, who is so sorry she made a mistake. But Katy is still worried. The kids are supposed to introduce their grandparents in front of the class and she’s afraid everyone will laugh at her speech impediment. But when she sees all the different kinds of grandmas and grandpas, she’s proud to introduce her grandpas: “They’re married … TO EACH OTHER.” Her classmates clap and Katy laughs.

This happy book, with bright, energetic illustrations, is written by a father-daughter team. Julie Lyford lives in the Twin Cities with her husband and two daughters and is an LGBTQ+ activist. She and her book were highlighted in a Feb. 21 Publishers Weekly article crediting her with persuading Amazon to create its new LGBTQ+ Families children’s book category.

Robert Schanke is a retired college theater professor who lives in Des Moines, Iowa, with his husband of 34 years. His books have been finalists for the Lambda Literary Award.

“Love, Violet” words by Charlotte Sullivan Wild, pictures by Charlene Chua (Farrar Straus Giroux, $18.99)

Book jacket for "Love, Violet"

Violet, who always wears a hat that’s a cross between a fedora and a cowboy hat, is left speechless by Mira, the girl with the cheery laugh. Violet wants to adventure with Mira, but whenever Violet wants to tell the girl how she feels, she gets shy. When Valentine’s Day approaches, Violet makes a special valentine for Mira, but the wind sweeps it away. When Violet makes an angel in the snow, and falls down, the other kids laugh at her. But Mira doesn’t. Instead, she hands a locket to Violet with a tiny violet inside. And the girls go off adventuring — together.

Charlotte Wilds Sullivan, a Minneapolis native with an MFA from Hamline University,  wrote most of this book in the Twin Cities with the support of community organizations and Minnesota grants. She blogs that she was a kid like Violet, with crushes on other girls.

Molly B. Ellis, executive director of publicity for Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group, says this is one of the first picture books by a major publisher to portray a queer crush between girls.

“Mama and Mommy and Me in the Middle” by Nina LaCour, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita (Candlewick Press, $17.99)

Book jacket for "Mama and Mommy and Me in the Middle"

Mommy is African-American, Mama is white, and the unnamed little narrator is in the middle, especially during hugs and at mealtime. The story is set during a week when Mommy is away on business and Mama and the narrator miss her a lot. There are phone calls during which they express their love for one another, and when the narrator feels too sad Mama takes her on her lap and says they can be sad together. Then, there’s cleaning and putting up a Welcome Home sign, and Mommy is back with the narrator where she belongs — in the middle. The writer and illustrator live in California.

“Some Daddies” by Carol Gordon Ekster, illustrated by Javiera Maclean Alvarez (Beaming Books, $17.99)

Book jacket for "Some Daddies"

Dads of all persuasions, gay and straight, sing, read, play, work and love their kids in this book for the very youngest readers. The message: “Every daddy is different. And every child is too.” The publisher is based in Minneapolis. The author is a former elementary school teacher who lives in Massachusetts and the illustrator is Chilean.

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Ira Winderman: NBA free-agency period more about trade season for Heat

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Ira Winderman: NBA free-agency period more about trade season for Heat

The most pressing question when it comes to Friday’s start of NBA free agency is . . . why?

Arguably, with scant few exceptions, this year there is no there there.

Yes, Bradley Beal will at least create the impression that he will explore options. Then he will re-sign with the Washington Wizards. All signs point in that direction.

Yes, Deandre Ayton is the rare restricted free agent who could actually leave via an offer sheet. But even then, it appears there are few dance partners, particularly with the draft approach taken by the cap-flush Detroit Pistons.

Yes, the New York Knicks will attempt to wildly overspend on Jalen Brunson, but even that will require additional cap gymnastics.

And can the Chicago Bulls actually afford to allow Zach LaVine to bolt after he was the linchpin of the (still-painful) trade of Jimmy Butler?

Otherwise, there are some intriguing names on the free-agent list, but also players whose ties are so strong to their current teams that the start of free agency merely should provide a rubber stamp, such as Kevon Looney with the Golden State Warriors, Anfernee Simmons with the Portland Trail Blazers, Bobby Portis with the Milwaukee Bucks and, seemingly (although when it comes to cash no one knows with Michael Jordan) Miles Bridges with the Charlotte Hornets.

Beyond that, only the Pistons, Orlando Magic, Indiana Pacers, San Antonio Spurs (and perhaps Knicks) have workable cap space above the $10.3 million mid-level salary-cap exception (and even then 12 teams don’t even have that because of their standing against the luxury tax).

So if the Miami Heat, or most teams, hope to make a splash during what is termed free agency but actually is the transaction period, trades likely will be the path.

As it was for Pat Riley’s front office in 2019 for Butler.

As it was last summer for the Heat with Kyle Lowry.

Essentially, we’re likely talking about the Summer of the Mid-Level Exception.

Because when you look at the free-agent list, beyond the aforementioned Beal, Ayton, LaVine, Brunson, and even Looney, Simons, Portis and Bridges, there otherwise are little more than complementary components.

How limited? The next tier appears to be Bruce Brown, P.J. Tucker, T.J. Warren, Gary Harris, Mitchell Robinson, Gary Payton II, Otto Porter Jr., Kyle Anderson, Malik Monk, Thaddeus Young, Chris Boucher, Victor Oladipo, Nicolas Batum, Delon Wright, Joe Ingles, Mo Bamba, Derrick Jones Jr., Dennis Schroder, Caleb Martin and Cody Martin.

Hardly transformative.

As far as free agency and the Heat, this summer could be something closer to James Johnson-Dion Waiters-Wayne Ellington (2016) or Avery Bradley-Maurice Harkless (2020).

Perhaps a pitch to Young as a replacement (if needed) for Tucker. Perhaps Ingles as an Oladipo-type low-cost rehab project.

Otherwise, the real list for the Heat might not be the free-agent list at all, but rather the intel of who might be available in trades, as well as the potential costs.

The chips are there: Duncan Robinson as cap filler, Tyler Herro as an intriguing prospect, and 2023 and 2028 first-round picks that could be put into play.

A splash is still possible, because it seemingly always is possible when it comes to Riley.

But this summer, perhaps even this coming week, it likely will be about more than getting a name signed on the dotted line. Instead, an upgrade likely will have to come through tricks of the trade.

Forget the start of free agency. This summer, it looks like the trade market will hold the greatest sway.

IN THE LANE

EVOLVING WINDOW: When it comes to a potential Philadelphia 76ers move for the Heat’s Tucker in free agency, keep an eye on two names: Matisse Thybulle and Furkan Korkmoz. If the 76ers can do something to shed those contracts, they could move below the luxury-tax line to make a three-year, $33 million offer to Tucker built off the non-taxpayer $10.3 million mid-level exception, trumping the $27 million the Heat could comfortably pay over that term without touching exception money. However, with Philadelphia’s draft-night move for De’Anthony Melton, it seemingly takes the 76ers out of play with the full mid-level and therefore seemingly out of play for Tucker, left instead with the taxpayer $6.4 million mid-level exception. The Heat, without touching their mid-level exception, could start a new Tucker contract at $8.4 million for next season.

BEASLEY’S BACK: Back playing competitively on U.S. soil for the first time since he was traded by the Los Angeles Lakers midway through the 2018-19 season, former Heat first-round pick Michael Beasley had quite the debut last week in the Big3 halfcourt circuit, including a pair of 4-point shots (from a circle set up near midcourt). Playing for the 3′s Company team captained by former Heat guard Mario Chalmers, Beasley closed with 26 points in the first-team-to-50 game format. The 50-47 victory was sealed by a winning basket from Chalmers, who briefly was with the Heat on a 10-day contract this past season (albeit not seeing action). The Beasley-Chalmers win came despite 26 points in opposition from former Heat guard Gerald Green.

NEXT TASK: With a goal of incorporating more mid-range shots into his game, Heat guard Gabe Vincent said he already has his offseason study guide. “There are two guys in this league that are really good and are on the same team. Chris Paul and Devin Booker have been great at it,” Vincent said during a visit to the Heat’s youth summer camp. “Obviously, DeMar [DeRozan], it’s part of his game now. [Carmelo Anthony] made a career off of it. But I think Chris Paul might be one of those guys that’s just a specialist in the pick-and-roll, a legend of this game. He uses it to his advantage to keep the defense honest. You go back and watch older film of Gilbert Arenas, those guys could always get to the elbows in an iso situation and get a shot up. So the play is there.”

CONTRASTING VIEW: While it appears Beal will take his maximum payoff from the Wizards in free agency, at least one NBA legend thinks it’s a mistake, especially with a potential suitor such as the Heat out there. “Miami would be a very dangerous team and possibly even win a championship with Bradley Beal along with Jimmy Butler and what they have down there. Just a phenomenal player and that’d be perfect,” Tracy McGrady told NBC Sports Washington. “I’m just telling you the truth. He’s been faithful to the Wizards, man. It’s time for him to play for a championship.”

YOUTH SERVED: With the 2022-23 regular season scheduled to start on Oct. 18 and with Heat first-round pick Nikola Jovik born on June 9, 2003, he stands to become the youngest Heat player in the franchise’s 35 seasons. The previous youngest: Justise Winslow, 19 years, 216 days, with MNA regular-season debut on Oct. 28, 2015 vs. Charlotte; Herro, 19 years, 276 days, on Oct. 23, 2019 vs. Memphis; Beasley, 19 years, 294 days, on Oct. 29, 2008 at New York; and Dorell Wright, 19 years, 335 days, Nov. 2, 2005 at Memphis.

NUMBER

5. Heat number issued to Jovic. The number previously has been worn with the Heat by Eric Murdock, Sasha Danilovic, Mark Strickland, Eddie House, Keyon Dooling, Derek Anderson, Marcus Banks, Quentin Richardson, Juwan Howard, Henry Walker, Amar’e Stoudemire, Luke Babbitt, Derrick Jones, Jr., Kyle Guy, and the Heat’s previous first-round pick, Precious Achiuwa.

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Bob Raissman: Draymond Green and the Warriors helping turn the NBA into reality TV

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Bob Raissman: Draymond Green and the Warriors helping turn the NBA into reality TV

For Golden State, capturing the NBA title was almost as important as settling media feuds, social media scores, or whatever you want to call them.

It wasn’t long after the Warriors won the title that Steph Curry was behind a microphone sticking it to (without naming him) ESPN NBA analyst Kendrick Perkins. In August, Perkins predicted the sharpshooter would not win another ring in the next four years.

And along the celebratory parade route, the self-anointed “new media” guru Draymond Green found his chance to get even. He was not as diplomatic as Curry. “If they ever doubted — this is live TV, right — bleep ‘em,” Green said.

More Green: “I warned y’all, so I’m just going to continue to destroy people on Twitter, as I have been, and Instagram stories.”

Such is life in the NBA, where responding to Tweets, making Instagram deposits, amplifies the art of trash talking. Cats like Green, Curry, Kyrie Irving, Kevin Durant and a whole lot of other guys are more media personalities than one-dimensional, hardcore, NBA players.

Green even has a seat waiting for him on TNT’s NBA coverage when he retires. On the surface, this all looks good for the NBA. The off-court drama provides plenty of material — even when school is not in session.

This ”gossipy” dimension should bring more casual fans inside the NBA’s big tent. Do the “reality show” elements of the league, and the way that is covered, have a substantial positive impact on overall viewership of the NBA’s postseason events where the big moo-la-dee is made? Or does it turn “fans” off?

That equation is hard to quantify. For what it’s worth, total average viewership for the 2022 Finals did not measure up to the 15 million average viewership for the pre-pandemic 2019 Finals. The viewership numbers for the 2022 Finals didn’t blow anyone out of the water.

Legions of eyeballs follow the league through highlight clips on the internet and get news (some of it directly from players) on social media. For some, tuning in for a full three-hour tilt is not exactly must-see TV. It’s not necessary to invest a hefty block of time to be entertained or find out what’s happening.

Platforms benefitting the most from the NBA soap opera are debate shows like “First Take” (ESPN), “Undisputed” (FS1), Valley of the Stupid offerings and podcasts that talk basketball.

Gasbags are feasting on the latest chapter in the Nets-Irving-Durant saga, which should be made into a docu-drama. The story can easily be followed through the words, or lack thereof, delivered by Durant.

The same Durant, who unlike the scribes assigned to cover HIS coverage of the story, has a personal interest in the situation.

It’s confusing. Yet very NBAish, right?

BELTRAN’S BOOTH STUMBLES

Carlos Beltran’s struggles at the microphone continued during Game 1of the Astros series.

Beltran, performing before an average of 456,000 viewers Thursday night on YES, made obvious points, delivered in a nearly monotone style. And he often just verbally rubber-stamped the analysis offered by his YES colleague David Cone. Hiring Beltran was a good idea. His reputation in baseball as an excellent communicator, a manager-in-waiting, resulted in high expectations.

And considering how he was scapegoated in the Astros cheating scandal, Beltran deserved a platform that would re-connect him with the game.

From a broadcasting perspective, Beltran looked good on paper. But how long can YES president of production/programming John J. Filippelli, wait for Beltran to meet those expectations before shuffling the deck? After all, not many baseball analysts become overnight sensations. It sometimes takes a hefty amount of game repetitions before there is a break-through.

Still, there could be an interim step for Beltran if he continues to stumble. He could be moved to YES’ Yankees studio. The controlled environment might loosen him up. The atmosphere might help him relax. That’s something he needs to do.

RATING THE REPLACEMENTS

The Yankees, and their WFAN radio partners, offered up two distinctly different styles in the voices they used to sit in John (Pa Pinstripe) Sterling’s seat last week, while Pa was “enjoying” his forced exile.

For those who like audio dynamite, there was Rickie Ricardo, the voice of Bombers Spanish radiocasts. Ricardo is high energy and flamboyant. You will not fall asleep under his watch. While he likes to cut the pie, he also pays attention to little things like actually letting listeners know where the defense is positioned. Fortunately, he didn’t have a HR call for every player. And Sterling’s “the Yankees win!” call was replaced by “What does it smell like folks? It smells like Vic-Tor-Y.”

On the other side of the mountain sat Justin Shackil who, among other things, is the Yankees digital reporter. A good listen, Shackil stuck to nuts and bolts. And he didn’t rent Sterling’s pom-poms while working the Toronto series. Shackil painted an effective, precise word picture. Most importantly, Shackil is likeable.

If we were forced to declare a winner here, it would be Suzyn (Ma Pinstripe) Waldman. She didn’t have to clean up any messes.

NO TAKE TV

With CJ McCollum returning to the “First Take” panel last week, Stephen A. Smith found it necessary to deliver a preamble to the NBA Players Assn. prez’s appearance.

”We know there are things you can’t say,” SAS proclaimed, providing instant cover for McCollum.

Smith was right.

The subject was Kyrie Irving, specifically how his propensity for missing games could expand into a collective bargaining subject at the negotiating table? When McCollum was asked to answer that question, he put on his tap-dancing shoes. He rambled on until Kendrick Perkins finally answered the question for him.

Again, what is the purpose of having, and paying, McCollum for his educated opinions if he’s going to verbally bob-and-weave on the topic of contract negotiations? If the “First Take” crew is going to accept McCollum’s pablum, it might has well put an owner on the show so we can watch two people say nothing about NBA contract negotiations.

AROUND THE DIAL

For reasons known only to him, WFAN’s Gregg Giannotti thought it was a great idea to take issue with SXM’s Christopher (Mad Dog) Russo revealing his First Take salary ($10,000 per appearance for 40 appearances) during an interview with Howard Stern. Giannotti thought ESPN suits would not be thrilled with Russo talking personal finances. We’re sure Doggie is shaking in his boots. … The way SNY’s Gary Cohen was complaining last Saturday, viewers would have thought he was calling Marlins-Mets from a booth in Antarctica. Cohen brought new meaning to the word “chilling.”… Astros-Yankees on YES Thursday night peaked at 696,000 total viewers from 10:15 to 10:30 p.m. Yankees game viewership is up 15% over last season. Guess pinstriped eyeballs have yet to become tired of winning.

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DUDE OF THE WEEK: VANN McELROY

Never forgetting his deep roots in Uvalde, Texas, McElroy, the former Raiders star, reached out to his former team to support the devastated community. That connection to the Raiders paid off. Owner Mark Davis authorized a $1 million donation for a city reeling from an unspeakable tragedy.

DWEEB OF THE WEEK: RON DeSANTIS

When the Florida Governor vetoes legislation over funding of a sports facility for a local area team, the Tampa Bay Rays, based on his interpretation of the team’s socially-minded initiative on gun control, it’s time to call out his brazen conduct. So, there.

DOUBLE TALK

What Eduardo Escobar said: “I think saying, ‘give me a couple of days off’ is essentially giving up.”

What Eduardo Escobar meant to say: “If I’m not hitting, I’m not playing.”

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