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Wales FA Council members have concerns after Gus Williams moved to Blackburn and Paul Bodin joined through the exit door

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Talent Identity Manager Gus Williams Joins Wales Under-21 Player Paul Bodin Through The Exit Door

VIEWINGS among Wales Football Association councilors grow after Gus Williams joined Paul Bodin through the exit door.

Longtime Welsh talent identity manager Williams joined Blackburn as head of recruitment on Friday – less than 24 hours after U21 manager Bodin was axed.

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Talent identity manager Gus Williams joins Wales Under-21 player Paul Bodin through the exit doorPhoto credit: Getty

And SunSport understand frustrated FAW councilors are ready to take their fears to Welsh bosses over the future alignment of the World Cup finalists after key staff departed at a golden time for the country.

Media and marketing staff at the club have also left in recent months.

And manager Robert Page is yet to agree a new deal with the FAW beyond November’s tournament in Qatar.

Williams, who will officially take up his new post at Ewood Park next month, played a crucial role in Wales’ journey to the finals of the Euro 2.

Additionally, he helped the nation reach their first World Cup in 64 years by identifying emerging talent over a two-decade span.

He has helped national coaches John Toshack, Gary Speed, Chris Coleman, Ryan Giggs and now Page throughout his career.

Over 90 per cent of Page’s side, who beat Ukraine in the play-off final at Cardiff City Stadium in June, have progressed through their talent recognition program from youth to senior level.

And it was Williams who spotted front-line stars like Premier League duo Ethan Ampadu and Brennan Johnson before the England-born talent switched allegiance to Wales.

Williams’ departure came just a day after Bodin was sacked after the Wales Under-21s finished fourth in their European Championship qualifier.

He is leaving CEO Noel Mooney to find a replacement.

Meanwhile, FAW councilor Huw Jones, who serves in South Wales, has been suspended from his duties until October 31 following an internal disciplinary hearing.

Jones also received an eight-month suspended sentence if he re-offended in the next year.

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Wales FA Council members have concerns after Gus Williams moved to Blackburn and Paul Bodin joined through the exit door

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Jeep has reinvented the windshield wiper. Here’s how it works

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Jeep Has Reinvented The Windshield Wiper. Here'S How It Works

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

The gas station raclette has nothing on this.

Jeep has developed a new type of wiper designed to clean dirt and mud from glass in a single pass.

The Clean Sweep: Jeep is a new accessory kit available in the Mopar Parts Catalog for current-generation Wrangler and Gladiator trucks.

The set includes new wiper arms and blades with 12 laser-cut holes that spray washer fluid as they sweep across the windshield.

JEEP NAMED MOST PATRIOTIC AUTOMOTIVE BRAND AND MANUFACTURER

Traditional spray nozzles are turned off and fluid is routed back to the blades through the tubing that comes with the package.

The Clean Sweep: Jeep system features wiper blades with 12 integrated water spray holes.
(Jeep)

When the washer is activated, fluid begins to flow before the wipers begin to move, creating a leading edge of fluid that helps clean the glass.

Jeep Claims This Feature Can Clean A Windshield Better Than A Traditional Windshield Washer System.

Jeep claims this feature can clean a windshield better than a traditional windshield washer system.
(Jeep)

Some other vehicles have spray nozzles located on the wiper arms to create a similar effect, but Jeep’s 12-hole blade design is unique.

THE JEEP WRANGLER HIGH TIDE WAS DESIGNED FOR THE BEACH

Jeep said the technology will help eliminate “blind seconds” that are often created when traditional windshield wipers smear debris on a windshield for a few passes before beginning to clean them. This is especially useful off-road for traversing the types of puddles and other mud the Wrangler and Gladiator were designed to tackle.

The Kit Comes With Two Sets Of Blades.

The kit comes with two sets of blades.
(Jeep)

The kit is available now and priced at $140, including two sets of blades.

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Jeep also touched on the subject of forward vision last year when it introduced a new line of Mopar windshields for the Wrangler and Gladiator made from the type of shatter-resistant Gorilla glass used on smartphones.

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86% of voters vote to recall Two Harbors mayor

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86% Of Voters Vote To Recall Two Harbors Mayor

TWO HARBORS — After seven months of controversy, residents voted to recall embattled Mayor Chris Swanson, ending his nearly 6-year run as mayor.

An unofficial tally of both in-person and absentee ballots, with 100% of precincts reporting, show 86% of voters voted to recall Swanson, with 1,149 voting “yes” to recall Swanson and only 180 voting “no” to keep him in office, according to the Minnesota Secretary of State website . The question on the ballot was: “Shall Mayor Christopher Swanson be recalled?”

There were 2,215 registered voters in Two Harbors as of 7 a.m., according to the Secretary of State website.

Swanson did not immediately return an email or voicemail seeking comment from the News Tribune.

Todd Ronning, chair of the Resign or Recall Committee, said the group “couldn’t be more happy with the results.”

“Our group and our community has been through a lot in the last six months,” Ronning told the News Tribune.

According to the Two Harbors City Charter , the council president will take over mayoral duties and a special election will be held during the next general election to fill the remainder of Swanson’s term, which expires January 2025. Ben Redden is the council president.

Recall efforts were spurred by Swanson’s underwater hotel and cryptocurrency pursuits in January, which brought a slew of other potential conflicts of interest and ethical concern to the surface.

Reviews of his actions have found he violated the city’s code and communications policy and was less than forthcoming with potential interests.

Two Harbors City Attorney Tim Costley in March issued a memorandum of opinion that found Swanson repeatedly used his official city position “for personal benefit or business interests” on a number of issues .

And in July, the Minnesota Office of the State Auditor found Swanson may not have disclosed all of his business and nonprofit interests before they went in front of the City Council. The auditor’s office also sided with the City Council and city attorney in their handling of the potential conflicts of interests.

“I would suggest that the actions of the City Council not only protected local citizens’ interest, but also helped protect the mayor, too,” State Auditor Julie Blaha told the News Tribune at the time. “I think he avoided some problems because (the City Council) avoided a number of contracts.”

Swanson has maintained he’s done nothing wrong and refused to resign, even after the City Council voted 6-0 in June asking him to resign. He did not attend a regularly scheduled council meeting from mid-June until Monday, when he arrived about nine minutes into the meeting, after the public comment period ended.

The Resign or Recall Committee began collecting signatures to move the recall forward in March. It needed 20%, or 498 signatures, of the city’s registered voters to sign the petition. It first gathered nearly 1,000 signatures, 735 of which were verified by the city. But the committee withdrew its petition because it had told people their signatures would be private and it learned later that would not be the case. Its second round of signatures garnered 618 signers, 532 of which were verified by the city.

“It looks like everyone who signed that petition pretty much got out and voted,” said Cynthia Kosiak, an organizer and attorney for the Resign or Recall Committee. “Which is not, generally, what happens.”

A lawsuit seeking to nullify the recall brought forward by a supporter of Swanson, who was represented by Swanson’s attorney, against the city and recall committee was dismissed in June.

The city spent $35,773 by bringing in outside attorneys to defend itself, Miranda Pietila, city financial director, said at the council meeting Monday.

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Samsung announces the Galaxy Z Fold 4

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Samsung Announces The Galaxy Z Fold 4

By CNBCTV18.com August 10, 2022, 7:15 PM STI (Update)

mini

Samsung is touting the Galaxy Z Fold 4 as its lightest and strongest Fold ever with a 6.2-inch cover screen and a 7.6-inch main screen.

Samsung is touting the Galaxy Z Fold 4 as its lightest and strongest Fold ever with a 6.2-inch cover screen and a 7.6-inch main screen. The phone is available in three colors – Graygreen, Phantom Black or Beige.

The device also has a new taskbar to help you do more as a multitasker. Samsung describes it as a “PC-like powerhouse in your pocket that transforms One UI-optimized apps to give you menus and more at a glance.”

The Galaxy Z Fold 4 comes with plenty of tools to get your gears going. And when you add third-party apps optimized for Multi-View, you unlock new levels of comfort with every press.

(This is a developing story. Follow this space for more updates.)

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US inflation slows from a 40-year peak but remains high

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Us Inflation Slows From A 40-Year Peak But Remains High

By CHRISTOPHER RUGABER

WASHINGTON (AP) — Falling gas prices gave Americans a slight break from the pain of high inflation last month, though overall price increases slowed only modestly from the four-decade high that was reached in June.

Consumer prices jumped 8.5% in July compared with a year earlier, the government said Wednesday, down from a 9.1% year-over-year jump in June. On a monthly basis, prices were unchanged from June to July, the smallest such rise in more than two years.

Besides gasoline, among the consumer purchases whose prices sank from June to July were airfares, which plunged nearly 8%. Hotel room costs fell 2.7%, used car prices 0.4%. Such items had previously delivered some of the economy’s steepest price jumps.

Those declines lowered so-called core inflation, a measure that excludes the volatile food and energy categories to provide a clearer picture of underlying inflation. Core prices rose just 0.3% from June, the smallest month-to-month increase since April. And compared with a year ago, core inflation amounted to 5.9% in July, the same year-over-year increase as in June.

Wednesday’s report raised hopes that a modest slowdown in inflation might enable the Federal Reserve to raise short-term interest rates by less than had been anticipated when it meets in late September. Many economists had forecast that it would increase its benchmark rate three-quarters of a point for a third straight time. But financial markets are now predicting that a half-point increase is more likely.

The prospect of slower inflation and smaller Fed rate hikes buoyed the stock market as trading began Wednesday, with futures pointing to a solid increase in the S&P 500 index.

Still, core prices have slowed in the recent past only to re-accelerate in subsequent months. And plenty of items are continuing to grow more expensive. Food prices kept surging in July, for example, and have risen 13% from a year ago, the largest such increase since 1979. The costs of rent, medical care and furniture also rose at elevated rates.

Average paychecks are rising faster than they have in decades, but not fast enough to keep up with higher costs.

President Joe Biden has pointed to declining gas prices as a sign that his policies — including large releases of oil from the nation’s strategic reserve — are helping lessen the higher costs that have strained Americans’ finances, particularly for lower-income Americans and Black and Hispanic households.

Yet Republicans are stressing the persistence of high inflation as a top issue in the midterm congressional elections, with polls showing that elevated prices have driven Biden’s approval ratings down sharply.

On Friday, the House is poised to give final congressional approval to a revived tax-and-climate package pushed by Biden and Democratic lawmakers. Economists say the measure, which its proponents have titled the Inflation Reduction Act, will have only a minimal effect on inflation over the next several years.

While there are signs that inflation may ease in the coming months, it will likely remain far above the Federal Reserve’s 2% annual target well into next year or even into 2024. Chair Jerome Powell has said the Fed needs to see a series of declining monthly core inflation readings before it would consider pausing its rate hikes. The Fed has raised its benchmark short-term rate at its past four rate-setting meetings, including a three-quarter point hike in both June and July — the first increases that large since 1994.

A blockbuster jobs report for July that the government issued Friday — with 528,000 jobs added, rising wages and an unemployment rate that matched a half-century low of 3.5% — solidified expectations that the Fed will announce yet another three-quarter-point hike when it next meets in September. Robust hiring tends to fuel inflation because it gives Americans more collective spending power.

One positive sign, though, is that Americans’ expectations for future inflation have fallen, according to a survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, likely reflecting the drop in gas prices that is highly visible to most consumers.

Inflation expectations can be self-fulfilling: If people believe inflation will stay high or worsen, they’re likely to take steps — such as demanding higher pay — that can send prices higher in a self-perpetuating cycle. Companies then often raise prices to offset higher their higher labor costs. But the New York Fed survey found that Americans’ foresee lower inflation one, three and five years from now than they did a month ago.

Supply chain snarls are also loosening, with fewer ships moored off Southern California ports and shipping costs declining. Prices for commodities like corn, wheat and copper have fallen steeply.

Yet in categories where price changes are stickier, such as rents, costs are still surging. One-third of Americans rent their homes, and higher rental costs are leaving many of them with less money to spend on other items.

Data from Bank of America, based on its customer accounts, shows that rent increases have fallen particularly hard on younger Americans. Average rent payments for so-called Generation Z renters (those born after 1996) jumped 16% in July from a year ago, while for baby boomers the increase was just 3%.

Stubborn inflation isn’t just a U.S. phenomenon. Prices have jumped in the United Kingdom, Europe and in less developed nations such as Argentina.

In the U.K., inflation soared 9.4% in June from a year earlier, a four-decade high. In the 19 countries that use the euro currency, it reached 8.9% in June compared with a year earlier, the highest since record-keeping for the euro began.

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Prominent Iranian poet Houshang Ebtehaj dies at 94

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Prominent Iranian Poet Houshang Ebtehaj Dies At 94

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Tehran, Iran — Houshang Ebtehaj, a distinguished Iranian poet whose modest but influential work made him a major figure in his own country and in world literature, died Wednesday in Cologne, Germany. He was 94 years old.

His death was confirmed by his daughter, Yalda Ebtehaj, who said on Instagram that her father, known by his pseudonym “Sayeh”, or Shadow, had “joined the other world”. In the message, she quoted a verse written by her father in the style of the great mystical poet Rumi: “Roam, roam roam… There are strangers in this house, so you wander strangely.”

The cause of death was kidney failure, according to semi-official Iranian media. Ebtehaj had lived in Germany since the late 1980s.

He was born in 1928 in the Iranian city of Rasht, some 240 kilometers (150 miles) northwest of Tehran, the capital. He started writing when he was young and published his first book of poetry when he was just 19 years old. Throughout the 20th century, Ebtehaj contributed to the popularity of the ghazal – a traditional form of Persian poetry set to music that expresses the writer’s feelings, especially about love, with moving intensity.

Filled with romance and melancholy longing, his work was not considered too political. But socialist politics was central to Ebtehaj’s identity. He sympathized with Iran’s communist Tudeh party and paid the price after the overthrow of Iran’s secular Western-backed monarchy in 1979. During the young Islamic Republic’s crackdown on leftists and liberals after the revolution, Ebtehaj landed in jail for almost a year.

He was released in 1984, when a well-known Iranian poet appealed to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, then President, to secure Ebtehaj’s freedom. Poet Mohammad-Hossein Shahriar wrote in a letter that Ebtehaj’s detention made angels cry on the throne of God.

Ebtehaj became recognized in Iran for his innovative verse which built on the foundations of Rumi and the famous 14th century Persian poet Hafez, combining traditional forms with modern social themes. He was also a musicologist and scholar, lecturing at universities across Europe on his critique of Hafez’s mystical lyric poetry. However, the international reach of his poetry remained somewhat limited, with only one collection translated into English.

Ebtehaj is survived by two sons and two daughters. His wife, Alma Maikial, died last year.

Condolences poured in from dozens of Iranians on Twitter, as well as cultural institutions and Iranian embassies.

The Iranian Embassy in Berlin said it was in mourning with “all lovers of Persian culture and literature around the world”.

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Trump says he’s testifying Wednesday in NY investigation

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Trump Says He’s Testifying Wednesday In Ny Investigation

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump will be questioned under oath Wednesday in the New York attorney general’s long-running civil investigation into his dealings as a real estate mogul, he confirmed in a post on his Truth Social account.

Trump’s testimony comes amid a flurry of legal activity surrounding him, taking place just days after FBI agents searched his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida as part of an unrelated federal probe into whether he took classified records when he left the White House.

He arrived at the New York attorney general’s office shortly before 9 a.m. in a multivehicle motorcade. As he left Trump Tower in New York City for the short ride downtown, he waved to reporters assembled outside but did not comment.

The New York civil investigation, led by Attorney General Letitia James, involves allegations that Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, misstated the value of prized assets like golf courses and skyscrapers, misleading lenders and tax authorities.

“In New York City tonight. Seeing racist N.Y.S. Attorney General tomorrow, for a continuation of the greatest Witch Hunt in U.S. history!” Trump wrote on Truth Social, invoking his oft-repeated claims about James, who is Black, and the investigation.

“My great company, and myself, are being attacked from all sides,” Trump added. “Banana Republic!”

Messages seeking comment were left with James’ office and with Trump’s lawyer.

Trump’s testimony is happening at a critical point in James’ investigation, midway through a pivotal week in his post-presidency.

In May, James’ office said that it was nearing the end of its probe and that investigators had amassed substantial evidence that could support legal action, such as a lawsuit, against Trump, his company or both.

The Republican billionaire’s deposition — a legal term for sworn testimony that’s not given in court — is one of the few remaining missing pieces, the attorney general’s office said.

Two of Trump’s adult children, Donald Jr. and Ivanka, testified in the investigation in recent days, two people familiar with the matter said. The people were not authorized to speak publicly and did so on condition of anonymity.

The Trumps’ testimony had initially been planned for last month but was delayed after the July 14 death of the former president’s ex-wife, Ivana Trump, the mother of Ivanka, Donald Jr. and another son, Eric Trump, who sat for a deposition in James’ investigation in 2020.

On Friday, the Trump Organization and its longtime finance chief, Allen Weisselberg, will be in court seeking dismissal of tax fraud charges brought against them last year in the Manhattan district attorney’s parallel criminal probe.

James, a Democrat, has said in court filings that her office has uncovered “significant” evidence that Trump’s company “used fraudulent or misleading asset valuations to obtain a host of economic benefits, including loans, insurance coverage, and tax deductions.”

James alleges the Trump Organization exaggerated the value of its holdings to impress lenders or misstated what land was worth to slash its tax burden, pointing to annual financial statements given to banks to secure favorable loan terms and to financial magazines to justify Trump’s place among the world’s billionaires.

The company even exaggerated the size of Trump’s Manhattan penthouse, saying it was nearly three times its actual size — a difference in value of about $200 million, James’ office said.

Trump has denied the allegations, explaining that seeking the best valuations is a common practice in the real estate industry. He says James’ investigation is part of a politically motivated “witch hunt” and that her office is “doing everything within their corrupt discretion to interfere with my business relationships, and with the political process.”

“THERE IS NO CASE!” Trump said in a February statement, after Manhattan Judge Arthur Engoron ruled that James’ office had “the clear right” to question Trump and other principals in his company.

While James has explored suing Trump or his company, the Manhattan district attorney’s office has long pursued a parallel criminal investigation.

That probe had appeared to be progressing toward a possible criminal indictment, but slowed after a new district attorney, Alvin Bragg, took office in January.

A grand jury that had been hearing evidence disbanded. The top prosecutor who had been handling the probe resigned after Bragg raised questions internally about the viability of the case.

Bragg has said his investigation is continuing, which means that Trump could invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination and decline to answer questions from James’ investigators.

According to the subpoena issued by James’ office, Trump was to appear in person at the attorney general’s office, located in a Manhattan office tower that has doubled as the fictional conglomerate Waystar Royco’s headquarters on HBO’s “Succession.”

As vociferous as Trump has been in defending himself in written statements and on the rally stage, legal experts say the same strategy could backfire in a deposition setting because anything he says could potentially be used against him or his company in the criminal investigation. No former president has even been charged with a crime.

In fighting to block the subpoenas, lawyers for the Trumps argued New York authorities were using the civil investigation to get information for the criminal probe and that the depositions were a ploy to avoid calling them before a criminal grand jury, where state law requires they be given immunity.

Last summer, spurred by evidence uncovered by James’ office, Manhattan prosecutors filed charges against Weisselberg and the Trump Organization. Prosecutors said Weisselberg collected more than $1.7 million in off-the-books compensation.

Weisselberg and the company have pleaded not guilty.

Weisselberg and Eric Trump each invoked the Fifth Amendment more than 500 times when questioned by James’ lawyers during separate depositions in 2020, according to court papers.

The former president could choose to do the same, but it’s likely “he’ll claim lack of knowledge on many questions,” New York University law professor Stephen Gillers said.

That could be a successful strategy, since Trump is known as more of a “big-picture guy” Gillers said. “So he’ll answer the big-picture questions and those answers will be general enough to keep him out of trouble, or so his lawyers will hope.”

“On the other hand, his impetuosity makes him a lawyer’s nightmare and his overconfidence may lead him astray. Whoever questions him will encourage that,” the professor added.

Once her investigation wraps up, James could decide to bring a lawsuit and seek financial penalties against Trump or his company, or even a ban on them being involved in certain types of businesses.

___

Associated Press writer Jill Colvin in New York contributed to this report.

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