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I spent $20 at Aldi and got enough food for a week – follow my grocery list

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This Delivery From Aldi Was Only $20

ALDI has become a haven for shoppers looking to save money on groceries, especially fresh produce.

A shopper could spend as little as $20 on a week’s worth of meals.

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This delivery from Aldi was only $20Photo credit: Youtube/ Linda J’s journey
All Of These Meals Were Prepared With $20 Worth Of Groceries

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All of these meals were prepared with $20 worth of groceriesPhoto credit: Youtube/ Linda J’s journey

Linda J has documented her grocery shopping and shared how much she spent and what it got her.

On her recent trip to Aldi, she challenged herself to buy enough for a week’s worth of meals on a $20 budget.

She explained that a $10 challenge would have been “impossible” due to soaring food prices.

Linda planned a shopping list of a variety of foods for breakfast, lunch, snacks, and dinner.

what she bought

Linda explained that she already had a few things at home that she would need for meals.

She said she was out of maple syrup, but her mom taught her a few tricks so she didn’t have to buy it.

She spent a total of $20.35.

Here’s what she bought

  • A Dozen Eggs, $2.99
  • Pancake Mix, $1.79
  • Seven bananas, 67 cents
  • A loaf of white bread, 93 cents
  • Potato Chips, $1.75
  • Sliced ​​Ham, $3.49
  • A can of baked beans, $1.79
  • Chicken drumsticks, $5.39 (on sale)
  • A 2-pound bag of carrots, $1.55

THE MENU

Linda had planned a menu to go with her purchases, so everything had multiple purposes.

She was given the egg and pancake mix for breakfast, but said she could use the bananas in the pancake mix instead of just a snack.

She also said she would freeze the pancakes to pop in the toaster whenever she wanted one as a snack on the go.

Linda’s mother told her she could boil brown sugar and water to make a substitute syrup, so she didn’t buy one.

For lunch, she grabbed a loaf of white bread for just 93 cents.

Since she had mayonnaise at home, she decided to get some sliced ​​ham.

She also got a bag of potato chips but said it was about the same price as sliced ​​cheese so you could swap the two out if you prefer.

Aldi offered chicken drumsticks for 89 cents a pound. She opted for a packet for dinner, which totaled $5.39.

Baked beans and carrots served as side dishes and snacks throughout the week.

She had all the spices she needed at home so she didn’t have to buy them.

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This comes as another TikToker finds out if Aldi is cheaper than Walmart and Lidl.

Plus, here are five healthy foods to try next time you visit Aldi.

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I spent $20 at Aldi and got enough food for a week – follow my grocery list

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The Antioch family find a 4-foot rattlesnake in their garden; the situation is increasingly common, according to experts

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The Antioch Family Find A 4-Foot Rattlesnake In Their Garden; The Situation Is Increasingly Common, According To Experts

ANTIOCH, Calif. (KGO) — As the California drought continues to worsen, the hot, dry weather continues to affect us all.

On Monday in Antioch, a family found a 4-foot rattlesnake in their garden, just feet from their sliding glass door.

The video of this snake has been recorded and you can hear the loud rattles in it.

“My wife got pictures of her fangs. The snake meant business,” Kelly Ouimet said.

RELATED: Pennsylvania man dies days after pet snake wraps around neck

The snakes in the courtyards are not out of the ordinary. Experts say they are becoming more common.

Luis Antonio Fraser of SnakeRemoval.com said that this year, as the dry and hot weather continues, snake calls are coming in large numbers. Now is the birthing season for rattlesnakes. By 10 a.m. Tuesday morning, Fraser had already received three rattlesnake calls.

“We get a lot of calls for baby snakes,” Fraser said.

But the serpent of Antioch was not a baby.

“It’s the biggest we’ve found in our yard,” said Kristi Ouimet.

VIDEO: Foster City officials approve plan to kill up to 100 Canada geese

The Ouimets got to work, using two snake catchers to get hold of this one.

“With rattlesnakes, we don’t mess around, they’re poisonous. They’re deadly, they’re dangerous, they’re not in danger, so we never move them. We just scoop their heads off with a shovel,” said Kristi said.

The snake the Ouimets found was about as big as their 11-year-old son, Matthew.

Neighbors in the area near Black Diamond Mines Regional Reserve say the rattlesnakes have come out.

“I’ve seen more this year actually than the previous years when we had no water. It looks like they’re coming back to the houses looking for water, plants and grass” , Giovanni said. Chamberlain who lives in the area.

RELATED: Bear breaks into Connecticut home multiple times in 1 week

“(They) seek irrigation, water and shade,” Fraser said.

All of them are in the Ouimets’ garden, a few meters from where the rattlesnake was found, as well as a few meters from their sliding glass door.

“Two of our three kids are also transplant recipients, and I really don’t want to know what’s going to happen with a kid who’s had a transplant and has to deal with one more snakebite,” Kristi said.

While the Ouimet family killed the rattlesnake in their yard, the snake catcher we spoke with said they didn’t kill the snakes. They will move them to areas away from where they are. Those at SnakeRemoval.com say they have employees located in northern and central California, including the Bay Area, Sacramento area, and Central Valley.

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Stillwater: Pick from 10- to 75-mile rides at this weekend’s Bridge the Valley Bike Rally

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Stillwater: Pick From 10- To 75-Mile Rides At This Weekend’s Bridge The Valley Bike Rally

About 500 bicyclists turned out last year for the first Bridge the Valley Bike Rally, which was held to celebrate the opening of the Loop Trail, the 4.7-mile trail the crosses the Stillwater Lift Bridge and the St. Croix River bridge.

This year, organizers expect 700-800 bicyclists to arrive in downtown Stillwater on Sunday morning for a series of rides designed for all ages and skills; entry fee is $40 until Saturday; $45 on Sunday.

Riders can choose from 10-, 25-, 45- and 70-mile loops on paved blacktop or a 75-mile loop that will include “gravel challenges,” said Mark Fisher, chairman of the public image committee of Stillwater Sunrise Rotary Club, which is helping organize the Bridge the Valley Bike Rally. There will be fully stocked rest stops and maintenance and support on all rides; there also will be live bands and food trucks, he said.

When a rider registers, they will get access to an app called “RidewithGPS,” an interactive mapping software that verbally and visually provides direction, Fisher said.

All rides will start and finish at Chestnut Plaza, immediately west of the Lift Bridge. For more information, go to https://www.sunrotary.org/page/btv.

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Chicago Bears remove linebacker Roquan Smith from physically unable to play list

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Chicago Bears Remove Linebacker Roquan Smith From Physically Unable To Play List

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — The Chicago Bears removed linebacker Roquan Smith from the physically unable to perform (PUP) list on Wednesday, the team announced.

The news comes a day after Smith, 25, said in a written statement that he requested a trade after contract negotiations between the linebacker and the team reached an impasse.

Smith showed up for training camp on July 26 without a new contract and was expected to hold out until he and the Bears reached an agreement. The former first-round pick is entering the final year of his rookie contract where he is expected to earn $9.7 million.

Smith has been through the Bears’ entire offseason training program this spring while awaiting a new contract and hasn’t appeared to be injured at any time. The linebacker was on hand for all 12 training camp practices, often seen riding a stationary bike and doing rehabilitation drills near the team’s weight room.

NFL teams are mandated by the collective bargaining agreement to pay players their full salary while on the PUP roster. The Bears can fine Smith $40,000 a day if he skips practice. Seattle wide receiver DK Metcalf and San Francisco wide receiver Deebo Samuel both held training camp for several days awaiting new contracts, but were not fined by their respective organizations.

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St. Paul Unitarian Universalist minister Rob Eller-Isaacs dies at 70

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St. Paul Unitarian Universalist Minister Rob Eller-Isaacs Dies At 70

Rob Eller-Isaacs, a co-minister of Unity Church Unitarian in St. Paul believed that everyone should have a spiritual practice, some daily ritual to center them. He often helped parishioners cultivate their own and many consider this one of the greatest gifts they’ve received from the Eller-Isaacs ministry. As a Unitarian Universalist minister, Eller-Isaacs’ own spiritual practice included singing, memorizing poetry, doing Tai Chi, reading, journaling and praying.

Eller-Isaacs, who had been diagnosed with cancer, died recently at the age of 70.

He could sing hundreds of songs across genres and religious traditions by heart.

“When you’re standing in the sanctuary at Unity Church and the whole congregation is singing, you could hear his voice for better or worse above everyone else in the sanctuary,” said his daughter, Hannah Franco-Isaacs. “And every time it would happen, I would look at whoever I was at church with and be like, ‘can you hear that?’ … I’d make eye contact with someone else participating in the service who was standing quite close to him and they’d start laughing.”

Eller-Isaacs was born in Chicago. on Nov. 7, 1951. He served as the co-minister of Unity Church Unitarian in St. Paul for more than 20 years alongside his wife, Janne Eller-Isaacs. In February he was diagnosed with metastasized bile duct cancer and he passed away on July 23.

As a child, he was a founding member of the Chicago Children’s Choir, a group that now has thousands of members. It inspired his lifelong love of singing and commitment to multiculturalism. This and other Unitarian Universalist groups gave him a sense of ministerial calling while he was still just an adolescent.

He never got his bachelor degree, instead spending his collegiate years traveling to places like the World Peace Conference in India. In his early twenties, he got his Masters of Divinity from Starr King School for the Ministry, a Unitarian Universalist graduate school. Unitarian Universalism is a religion that forgoes dogma, embraces an all-inclusive spirituality and has a strong legacy of social justice work.

“He really deeply believed that there are no other people’s children,” Franco-Isaacs said, “that you love everyone as if they were your own.”

Jen Crow, a senior minister at First Universalist Church of Minneapolis, knew Eller-Isaacs for more than 20 years. She said the notion that there are no other people’s children was central to his ministry. “That was a guiding phrase he would use in a lot of his speeches or sermons. Just that we are all responsible for each other, that there’s not some separation and if we can learn to have the same kind of love we have for our kids or for someone who’s dear to us for everyone, then that will change our hearts and change our actions.”

Janne Eller-Isaacs described her husband as someone who believed in the promise of a multicultural world and constantly had his heart broken by the imperfections of our own.

“He believed in the intersection of social justice and spiritual development as inexorably connected. He thought it was a real flaw in ministry that people were like ‘I’m an activist minister’ or ‘I dwell in the life of the Spirit.’ It was like no, you have to do both.”

Rob was a leading figure in the national Unitarian Universalist community, serving for two years as president of the Unitarian Universalist Ministers Association. Before the couple began ministry in St. Paul, they served in Oakland, Calif., for almost 20 years. There, Rob was a founding chairperson of the Oakland Commission on Homelessness. In Minnesota, he continued to serve the unhoused in his role as co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign Minnesota. Racial justice was central to his ministry and he was instrumental in securing $5 million funding for Black Lives of Unitarian Universalism.

In 2017, the Unitarian Universalist church commissioned an audit to address institutional racism and a lack of diversity in church membership and leadership. Eller-Isaacs welcomed the criticism, saying “that means not shrinking when I’m afraid I’m going to be called a racist, patriarchal, old minister.”

His wife described him as fiercely devoted to his family. The two retired to Portland, Ore., in June of 2021. She said, “He was really, really looking forward to retirement. He would light up when the grandchildren would come into our home.”

A Portland service will take place at 3 p.m. on Sep. 10 at the First Unitarian Church of Portland and the St. Paul service will take place at 3 p.m. on Sep. 17 at Unity Church Unitarian. Both services will be live streamed and information will be shared to Eller-Isaacs’ CaringBridge site.

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Startups, if your CEO isn’t managing your fundraising, you’re wrong – TechCrunch

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Startups, If Your Ceo Isn'T Managing Your Fundraising, You'Re Wrong - Techcrunch

In my past as an investor and in my present as a pitch coach, I’ve come across a surprising number of companies where someone outside of the founding team is trying to raise money for the ‘company. Of course, the sellers are very good at selling (that’s why they are sellers)but no investor will take you seriously if someone other than the founders – and ideally the CEO – leads the fundraising process.

I’m using the title “salesperson” here – but I’ve also seen people in social media outreach, people in marketing, and even people in PR reaching out to investors. Overall, this is a very poor indicator of a high value investment, and I know a lot of investors who won’t even really look at the investment opportunity.

There are many reasons why founders need to be there, but the most important is the job description of a CEO. In the beginning, when there are only two or three of you starting a business, everyone does everything. As a company matures, however, the role of the CEO usually shrinks more and more, until he is left with only three jobs:

  • Define the company culture.
  • Hire the right people to build the business.
  • Whatever you do, don’t run out of money.

It is the last item on this list that is problematic. If you’re not in the best position to raise funds for your startup, what does that say about you? And if you are best person to fundraise, why don’t you?

Investors are a different beast than your regular customers. They rarely see a pitch and grab the checkbook, only to wait for the big bucks. Most investors want to establish some sort of ongoing relationship with their investments. For small investors, it’s about being on regular updates, and when the CEO asks if anyone knows an amazing vice president of engineering, check your little black book of contacts to see he can help you one way or another. For board members, there’s usually a lot more strategic and ongoing investment. Either way, these investors will want to build an ongoing relationship with the founders.

The other problem is that, generally, only the (co-)founders hold significant capital in a company. It’s good for them, and it represents a sort of lockdown. A (co-)founder leaving a company is a big deal. If you send your sales people out to “sell” the business, your investor will know two things: first, they probably don’t have a significant stake in the business, and building an ongoing relationship with that person is likely to be futile; they might leave, or they might (accidentally) misrepresent the company in some important respect. Second, if the seller has a huge stake in the property, it’s a different red flag — that the founders don’t know how to manage their cap table.

Either way, know that getting an introduction from anyone who isn’t one of the company’s founders — and, as I mentioned, ideally the CEO — is a huge red flag for the company. most investors.

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3 things heard at Chicago Bears camp, including Roquan Smith coming off the PUP list a day after his trade request

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3 Things Heard At Chicago Bears Camp, Including Roquan Smith Coming Off The Pup List A Day After His Trade Request

The Chicago Bears returned to practice Wednesday at Halas Hall to prepare for Saturday’s preseason game against the Kansas City Chiefs at Soldier Field.

Here are three things we learned afterward from players.

1. The Bears removed linebacker Roquan Smith from the physically unable to perform list.

A day after Smith requested a trade from the Bears because of stalled contract negotiations, the team announced it took him off the PUP list, where he had resided since the first day of training camp.

His placement on the list meant he wouldn’t be fined for not participating in practices as he waits for a new contract from the Bears. Smith has staged a “hold-in,” which allows him to attend meetings and train at Halas Hall while not practicing. He has been at most practices but was not spotted Wednesday.

It’s unclear whether the Bears removed him in case of a trade or so they could fine him for sitting out after he released a bold statement to NFL Network on Tuesday saying the Bears didn’t value him and “refused to negotiate in good faith.”

Smith’s dispute with Bears general manager Ryan Poles over a potential extension remained a topic of conversation Wednesday.

Teammates Robert Quinn and Darnell Mooney said players would love to have Smith remain in the building. But they also expressed an understanding of why Smith applied pressure to the Bears with the statement.

“You see that all the time with players trying to put the heat on the organization just trying to get a deal done,” Mooney said. “It’s nothing that I can do or anything, so I’m just looking from far away.”

Quinn recalled watching defensive tackle Aaron Donald hold out when both were with the Los Angeles Rams in 2017. After holding out for a second straight training camp a year later, Donald eventually received a six-year, $135 million deal.

Quinn said he understands if Smith “wants to get as much as possible” and said he respectfully thinks the linebacker deserves it.

“It’s an opportunity to take care of your family and all that good stuff, so you don’t want to sell yourself short,” Quinn said. “Because not a lot of people get to sign new contracts, and if you’re one of the best at your position, you want to make sure you sign a well-compensated contract.

“But I’m not GM. I’m not Roquan. I’m not the owner. I’ve got my two cents, and I’m sure no one cares about them anyway.”

2. Even Darnell Mooney acknowledged his catch at Family Fest on Tuesday was ‘crazy.’

Undrafted free-agent cornerback Jaylon Jones texted Mooney after Tuesday’s practice to say he didn’t know what he could have done differently to defend Mooney’s leaping, one-handed catch.

“I was like, ‘It was great defense, man. Just a crazy catch,’” Mooney said.

Mooney got behind Jones and in front of safety Eddie Jackson to grab the ball down the right sideline for a 20-plus-yard catch.

“It was just a fade. Justin (Fields) just put the ball up for me, so only I can make the play,” Mooney said. “I mean the guy was holding my arm, so I was like, ‘Oh, this is all I’ve got, so I’m just going to stick it up there.’ Looked the ball all the way through, squeezed and it was a good catch.”

It’s unclear how many opportunities Mooney will have to make big catches when he gets into preseason action Saturday.

Bears coach Matt Eberflus said starters will play against the Chiefs but hasn’t yet revealed how much. Mooney said he’s interested in playing to get back into the rhythm of a game and to begin to get a feel for how offensive coordinator Luke Getsy calls plays.

3. The injuries and absences continue to pile up.

Tight end Cole Kmet and running back David Montgomery were the newest players to sit out practice.

Eberflus didn’t speak to reporters Wednesday but will speak Thursday. Kmet sat out the later portion of practice Tuesday at Soldier Field before working out to the side Wednesday, while Montgomery’s absence was new.

They were two of 21 players who were either missing or working out to the side. The others were wide receivers N’Keal Harry, Byron Pringle, Velus Jones Jr., David Moore and Dante Pettis; cornerbacks Kyler Gordon, Kindle Vildor, Thomas Graham Jr., Tavon Young, Duke Shelley and Greg Stroman Jr.; safety Dane Cruikshank; tight ends Ryan Griffin and James O’Shaughnessy; defensive linemen Angelo Blackson and Mario Edwards Jr.; linebacker Noah Dawkins; and offensive linemen Lucas Patrick and Julien Davenport.

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