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Who is the Uncoupled star married to?

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Who Is The Uncoupled Star Married To?

We all love Neil Patrick Harris, especially after his role as Barney on CBS’ hit series. How I met your mother. It’s always exciting to see your favorite actors in new projects. And now the star will be helming a new show on Netflix!

Harris will play Michael Lawson in the new series. disconnected. The New York real estate agent thought his life was perfect until one day everything changes when his longtime partner Colin, of 17 years, decides to leave. Now Michael must contend with two nightmares: losing the one he thought was his soulmate and suddenly finding himself a single gay man in his mid-40s in NYC.

The eight-episode Netflix Original will be released on Friday, July 29. The romantic comedy was created by Darren Star and Jeffrey Richman.

Because of the upcoming show, Harris has been in the headlines more than usual. So you may be wondering who is involved in his love life!

Who is Uncoupled star Neil Patrick Harris married to?

Harris is married to actor and chef David Burtka. Burtka actually appeared in seven episodes of How I met your mother, who plays Scooter, who was Lily Aldrin’s former high school boyfriend. Like his husband, Burtka also acted on Broadway. However, now he is mainly focused on his culinary career.

In 2007, the couple made their red carpet debut at the Emmy Awards. They have been together since 2004. The two announced their engagement after the Marriage Equality Act was passed in New York in 2011. Harris and Burtka had proposed marriage five years earlier, but waited until same-sex marriage became legal.

They officially tied the knot in Italy in September 2014 How I met your mother Director Pamela Fryman officiates and music legend Elton John performs at the reception.

Harris and Burtka are parents to twins, their son Gideon Scott and their daughter Harper Grace. They were born in October 2010. Check out Harris’ Instagram page for cute photos of the couple and their kids!

Who is the Uncoupled star married to?

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Trump says he’s testifying Wednesday in NY investigation

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Trump Says He’s Testifying Wednesday In Ny Investigation

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump will be questioned under oath Wednesday in the New York attorney general’s long-running civil investigation into his dealings as a real estate mogul, he confirmed in a post on his Truth Social account.

Trump’s testimony comes amid a flurry of legal activity surrounding him, taking place just days after FBI agents searched his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida as part of an unrelated federal probe into whether he took classified records when he left the White House.

He arrived at the New York attorney general’s office shortly before 9 a.m. in a multivehicle motorcade. As he left Trump Tower in New York City for the short ride downtown, he waved to reporters assembled outside but did not comment.

The New York civil investigation, led by Attorney General Letitia James, involves allegations that Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, misstated the value of prized assets like golf courses and skyscrapers, misleading lenders and tax authorities.

“In New York City tonight. Seeing racist N.Y.S. Attorney General tomorrow, for a continuation of the greatest Witch Hunt in U.S. history!” Trump wrote on Truth Social, invoking his oft-repeated claims about James, who is Black, and the investigation.

“My great company, and myself, are being attacked from all sides,” Trump added. “Banana Republic!”

Messages seeking comment were left with James’ office and with Trump’s lawyer.

Trump’s testimony is happening at a critical point in James’ investigation, midway through a pivotal week in his post-presidency.

In May, James’ office said that it was nearing the end of its probe and that investigators had amassed substantial evidence that could support legal action, such as a lawsuit, against Trump, his company or both.

The Republican billionaire’s deposition — a legal term for sworn testimony that’s not given in court — is one of the few remaining missing pieces, the attorney general’s office said.

Two of Trump’s adult children, Donald Jr. and Ivanka, testified in the investigation in recent days, two people familiar with the matter said. The people were not authorized to speak publicly and did so on condition of anonymity.

The Trumps’ testimony had initially been planned for last month but was delayed after the July 14 death of the former president’s ex-wife, Ivana Trump, the mother of Ivanka, Donald Jr. and another son, Eric Trump, who sat for a deposition in James’ investigation in 2020.

On Friday, the Trump Organization and its longtime finance chief, Allen Weisselberg, will be in court seeking dismissal of tax fraud charges brought against them last year in the Manhattan district attorney’s parallel criminal probe.

James, a Democrat, has said in court filings that her office has uncovered “significant” evidence that Trump’s company “used fraudulent or misleading asset valuations to obtain a host of economic benefits, including loans, insurance coverage, and tax deductions.”

James alleges the Trump Organization exaggerated the value of its holdings to impress lenders or misstated what land was worth to slash its tax burden, pointing to annual financial statements given to banks to secure favorable loan terms and to financial magazines to justify Trump’s place among the world’s billionaires.

The company even exaggerated the size of Trump’s Manhattan penthouse, saying it was nearly three times its actual size — a difference in value of about $200 million, James’ office said.

Trump has denied the allegations, explaining that seeking the best valuations is a common practice in the real estate industry. He says James’ investigation is part of a politically motivated “witch hunt” and that her office is “doing everything within their corrupt discretion to interfere with my business relationships, and with the political process.”

“THERE IS NO CASE!” Trump said in a February statement, after Manhattan Judge Arthur Engoron ruled that James’ office had “the clear right” to question Trump and other principals in his company.

While James has explored suing Trump or his company, the Manhattan district attorney’s office has long pursued a parallel criminal investigation.

That probe had appeared to be progressing toward a possible criminal indictment, but slowed after a new district attorney, Alvin Bragg, took office in January.

A grand jury that had been hearing evidence disbanded. The top prosecutor who had been handling the probe resigned after Bragg raised questions internally about the viability of the case.

Bragg has said his investigation is continuing, which means that Trump could invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination and decline to answer questions from James’ investigators.

According to the subpoena issued by James’ office, Trump was to appear in person at the attorney general’s office, located in a Manhattan office tower that has doubled as the fictional conglomerate Waystar Royco’s headquarters on HBO’s “Succession.”

As vociferous as Trump has been in defending himself in written statements and on the rally stage, legal experts say the same strategy could backfire in a deposition setting because anything he says could potentially be used against him or his company in the criminal investigation. No former president has even been charged with a crime.

In fighting to block the subpoenas, lawyers for the Trumps argued New York authorities were using the civil investigation to get information for the criminal probe and that the depositions were a ploy to avoid calling them before a criminal grand jury, where state law requires they be given immunity.

Last summer, spurred by evidence uncovered by James’ office, Manhattan prosecutors filed charges against Weisselberg and the Trump Organization. Prosecutors said Weisselberg collected more than $1.7 million in off-the-books compensation.

Weisselberg and the company have pleaded not guilty.

Weisselberg and Eric Trump each invoked the Fifth Amendment more than 500 times when questioned by James’ lawyers during separate depositions in 2020, according to court papers.

The former president could choose to do the same, but it’s likely “he’ll claim lack of knowledge on many questions,” New York University law professor Stephen Gillers said.

That could be a successful strategy, since Trump is known as more of a “big-picture guy” Gillers said. “So he’ll answer the big-picture questions and those answers will be general enough to keep him out of trouble, or so his lawyers will hope.”

“On the other hand, his impetuosity makes him a lawyer’s nightmare and his overconfidence may lead him astray. Whoever questions him will encourage that,” the professor added.

Once her investigation wraps up, James could decide to bring a lawsuit and seek financial penalties against Trump or his company, or even a ban on them being involved in certain types of businesses.

___

Associated Press writer Jill Colvin in New York contributed to this report.

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Foxconn warns of slowing smartphone demand

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Foxconn Warns Of Slowing Smartphone Demand

foxcon Technology Group, the world’s largest iPhone maker, said demand for smartphones and other consumer electronics was slowing, prompting it to be cautious in the current quarter.

President of Foxconn Young Liu said the smartphone market could remain stable for the rest of the year compared to a year earlier. He listed possible risks, including geopolitical developments, inflation and the pandemic.

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Inflation report today: CPI data shows consumer prices jumped 8.5% in July, slipping from a 40-year high

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Inflation Report Today: Cpi Data Shows Consumer Prices Jumped 8.5% In July, Slipping From A 40-Year High

WASHINGTON– Falling gasoline prices gave Americans a slight break from the pain of high inflation last month, although the surge in overall prices has slowed only slightly from the four-decade high reached in June.

Consumer prices jumped 8.5% in July from a year earlier, the government said on Wednesday, compared with a 9.1% year-on-year jump in June. Month-over-month prices remained unchanged from June to July, the smallest such increase in more than two years.

Yet prices are rising for a wide range of goods and services, making the situation worse for most Americans. Average paychecks are rising faster than they have in decades, but not fast enough to keep up with accelerating costs for items such as food, rent, automobiles and medical services.

President Joe Biden has pointed to falling gasoline prices as a sign that his policies — including large releases of oil from the country’s strategic reserve — are helping to reduce higher costs that have strained governments. finances of Americans, especially for low-income and black Americans. and Hispanic households.

MORE: Senate Democrats pass Cut Inflation Act; Chamber to vote then

Still, Republicans point to persistently high inflation as one of the main issues in the midterm congressional elections, with polls showing that high prices have sent Biden’s approval ratings plummeting.

On Friday, the House is set to give final congressional approval to a revived tax and climate package pushed by Biden and Democratic lawmakers. Economists say the measure, which its proponents have dubbed the Inflation Reduction Act, will have only a minimal effect on inflation over the next few years.

Although there are signs that inflation may ease in the coming months, it is likely to remain well above the Federal Reserve’s 2% annual target until next year or even until in 2024. Chairman Jerome Powell said the Fed should see a series of monthly cuts. readings of underlying inflation before considering suspending rate hikes. The Fed has raised its benchmark short-term rate in its past four rate-setting meetings, including a three-quarter point hike in June and July — the first such large increases since 1994.

SEE ALSO: Back-to-school fees are skyrocketing. Here’s how to cut supply costs and beat inflation

A blockbuster jobs report for July that the government released on Friday – with 528,000 jobs added, wages rising and an unemployment rate at a half-century low of 3.5% – bolstered expectations that the Fed will announce another three-quarter point hike at its next meeting in September. Robust hiring tends to fuel inflation because it gives Americans greater collective purchasing power.

A positive sign, however, is that Americans’ expectations for future inflation have declined, according to a survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, likely reflecting lower gasoline prices that are very visible to most consumers.

Inflation expectations can be self-fulfilling: if people think inflation will stay high or get worse, they are likely to take actions – such as demanding higher wages – that can drive up prices in a self-perpetuating cycle. Companies then often increase their prices to compensate for the increase in their higher labor costs. But the New York Fed’s survey found that Americans expect lower inflation in the next one, three and five years than a month ago.

Supply chain issues are also easing, with fewer ships docked off Southern California ports and shipping costs falling. Prices for commodities such as corn, wheat and copper fell sharply.

Yet in categories where price changes are more rigid, such as rents, costs continue to rise. A third of Americans rent their homes, and higher rental costs leave many with less money to spend on other items.

Data from Bank of America, based on its accounts receivable, shows that rent increases have hit young Americans particularly hard. Average rent payments for so-called Gen Z renters (those born after 1996) jumped 16% in July from a year ago, while for baby boomers the increase was only by 3%.

Stubborn inflation is not just an American phenomenon. Prices have jumped in the UK, Europe and less developed countries like Argentina.

UK inflation rose 9.4% in June from a year earlier, a four-decade high. In the 19 countries that use the euro, it reached 8.9% in June compared to a year earlier, the highest since the start of the registration of the euro.

Copyright © 2022 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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US inflation slips from 40-year high but remains high at 8.5% – The Denver Post

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Us Inflation Slips From 40-Year High But Remains High At 8.5% - The Denver Post

By CHRISTOPHER RUGABER

WASHINGTON (AP) — Falling gasoline prices gave Americans a slight break from the pain of high inflation last month, though the surge in overall prices has slowed only slightly from the four-year high. decades reached in June.

Consumer prices jumped 8.5% in July from a year earlier, the government said on Wednesday, compared with a 9.1% year-on-year jump in June. Month-over-month prices remained unchanged from June to July, the smallest such increase in more than two years.

Yet prices have risen for a wide range of goods and services, making the situation worse for most Americans. Average paychecks are rising faster than they have in decades, but not fast enough to keep up with accelerating costs for items such as food, rent, automobiles and medical services.

Last month, excluding the volatile food and energy categories, so-called core prices rose just 0.3% from June, the smallest one-month increase in the other since April. And compared to a year ago, core prices rose 5.9% in July, the same year-over-year increase as in June.

President Joe Biden has pointed to falling gasoline prices as a sign that his policies – including large releases of oil from the country’s strategic reserve – are helping to reduce higher costs that have strained finances of Americans, especially for low-income Americans and Blacks and Hispanics. households.

Still, Republicans point to persistently high inflation as one of the main issues in the midterm congressional elections, with polls showing that high prices have sent Biden’s approval ratings plummeting.

On Friday, the House is set to give final congressional approval to a revived tax and climate package pushed by Biden and Democratic lawmakers. Economists say the measure, which its proponents have dubbed the Inflation Reduction Act, will have only a minimal effect on inflation over the next few years.

Although there are signs that inflation may ease in the coming months, it is likely to remain well above the Federal Reserve’s 2% annual target until next year or even until in 2024. Chairman Jerome Powell said the Fed should see a series of monthly cuts. readings of underlying inflation before considering suspending rate hikes. The Fed has raised its benchmark short-term rate in its past four rate-setting meetings, including a three-quarter point hike in June and July — the first such large increases since 1994.

A blockbuster jobs report for July that the government released on Friday – with 528,000 jobs added, wages rising and an unemployment rate at a half-century low of 3.5% – bolstered expectations that the Fed will announce another three-quarter point hike when it meets next in September. Robust hiring tends to fuel inflation because it gives Americans greater collective purchasing power.

A positive sign, however, is that Americans’ expectations for future inflation have declined, according to a survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, likely reflecting lower gasoline prices that are very visible to most consumers.

Inflation expectations can be self-fulfilling: if people think inflation will stay high or get worse, they are likely to take actions – such as demanding higher wages – that can drive up prices in a self-perpetuating cycle. Companies then often increase their prices to compensate for the increase in their higher labor costs. But the New York Fed’s survey found that Americans expect lower inflation in the next one, three and five years than a month ago.

Supply chain issues are also easing, with fewer ships docked off Southern California ports and shipping costs falling. Prices for commodities such as corn, wheat and copper fell sharply.

Yet in categories where price changes are more rigid, such as rents, costs continue to rise. A third of Americans rent their homes, and higher rental costs leave many with less money to spend on other items.

Data from Bank of America, based on its accounts receivable, shows that rent increases have hit young Americans particularly hard. Average rent payments for so-called Gen Z renters (those born after 1996) jumped 16% in July from a year ago, while for baby boomers the increase was only by 3%.

Stubborn inflation is not just an American phenomenon. Prices have jumped in the UK, Europe and less developed countries like Argentina.

UK inflation rose 9.4% in June from a year earlier, a four-decade high. In the 19 countries that use the euro, it reached 8.9% in June compared to a year earlier, the highest since the start of the registration of the euro.

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Gas prices have fallen for 57 consecutive days.

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Gas Prices Have Fallen For 57 Consecutive Days.

U.S. gasoline prices have fallen for 57 straight days since hitting a high of more than $5 a gallon in June.

The national average gas price was $4.01 on Wednesday, according to AAA. That’s higher than a year ago, but still well below the all-time high of nearly $5.02 in mid-June (unadjusted for inflation). Energy costs are fueling general measures of inflation, so the decline is also good news for policymakers who have made limiting rising fuel prices a priority.

The decline reflects a number of factors: lower demand because high costs kept some drivers off the roads; a drop in world oil prices in recent months; and a handful of states suspending gasoline taxes. The drop was welcomed by the Biden administration, which has been orchestrating a campaign for months to lower gas prices and criticizes energy companies for profiting at the expense of American consumers.

Lower gasoline prices are also a positive signal for the economy, as businesses are under less pressure to pass on energy costs to their customers, which would add to the country’s inflation problem.

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latest news Hawaiian man arrested in Karen Stitt California murder case

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Latest News Hawaiian Man Arrested In Karen Stitt California Murder Case

Northern California authorities arrested a 75-year-old Hawaiian in connection with the rape and murder of a teenager in Sunnyvale nearly 40 years ago, using forensic genealogy to identify the suspect from his family tree.

Gary Ramirez was arrested Aug. 2 at his home in Makawao on the island of Maui, the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office announced Tuesday. Once extradited, he will be charged with murder with rape and kidnapping under special circumstances, as well as being armed with a dangerous or deadly weapon during the commission of a crime.

Karen Stitt, 15, of Palo Alto was last seen on the night of September 2, 1982. She and her 17-year-old boyfriend met at a 7-Eleven shortly before 9 p.m., walked to a miniature golf course and continued to Ponderosa Elementary School, according to a statement from Sunnyvale Det. Matthew Hutchison.

Hutchison’s statement was included with the charging documents filed against Ramirez. Stitt’s boyfriend has not been identified.

Around midnight, Stitt’s boyfriend drove her from school to the area near the convenience store so she could take a bus back to Palo Alto, Hutchison said.

The boyfriend “later told police that he felt bad leaving her alone, but he didn’t want to get in trouble with his parents for coming home late,” according to the statement.

At around 10.45am the next morning, a lorry driver discovered what he thought was the naked body of a woman lying in the bushes at the base of a cinder block retaining wall along the driveway of the Woolworth Garden Center, where he was making a delivery, Hutchison said. .

Stitt’s wrists were bound behind his back with his shirt, his jacket was tied around his left ankle, and a bloodstain was found above the cinder block wall just above his body.

A medical examiner found she had been stabbed 59 times in the neck, chest, abdomen and back, Hutchison said. The cause of his death was found to be “stab wounds to the chest and neck”.

Stitt’s body was found about 100 yards from the bus stop, and investigators noted that leaves and dirt around her feet had been disturbed and kicked, “suggesting she was still alive when his body was moved there,” Hutchison said.

A thorough investigation failed to identify a suspect and the case went cold for 20 years.

In 2000, DNA analysis technology allowed investigators to build a genetic profile of the suspect from a sample taken from the bloodstain on the cinderblock wall above Stitt, Hutchison said. . Swabs taken from the scene along with items taken from Stitt’s body were also sent to the Santa Clara County crime lab.

Investigators found that DNA from an unknown man taken from the sample on the wall matched the profile of DNA found on Stitt’s jacket and sperm found on vaginal slides taken during her autopsy.

A DNA sample from Stitt’s then-boyfriend did not match and he was ruled out as a suspect, the detective said. No match was found after matching the unknown profile against a national DNA crime database.

Hutchison said that in 2021 he received a tip that a male member of the Ramirez family may have killed Stitt, kicking off his genealogy research.

US census records and other public databases showed the family lived in Fresno, about 160 miles from Sunnyvale, as early as 1950, according to the detective’s statement.

Hutchison discovered that there were four living Ramirez brothers; further investigation ruled out two of the brothers, and he was unable to conclusively rule out a third, leading him to focus on Gary Ramirez.

In early March, Hutchison took to social media to identify Ramirez’s daughter, and he “obtained a sample” of her DNA on April 8. Court documents did not specify how the detective obtained the sample.

Investigators found “very strong statistical support” linking DNA from Ramirez’s daughter to unknown male DNA from the Stitt crime scene, the detective said, establishing Ramirez as the prime suspect.

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