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Steven Gerrard’s brutal fines for Aston Villa stars have been revealed, including forgetting birthday cake and flip flops in the shower

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Steven Gerrard'S Alleged Fine List Leaked Online

STEVEN GERRARD has been quick to set the law since taking the reins at Aston Villa.

Having quickly banned ketchup upon his appointment, the club’s rumored fines list for the upcoming season has now been leaked.

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Steven Gerrard’s alleged fine list leaked onlinePhoto credit: Getty
The Aston Villa Boss Doesn'T Hesitate To Punish His Players When They Step Out Of Line

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The Aston Villa boss doesn’t hesitate to punish his players when they step out of lineRecognition:

A list of fines has been rumored to have been leaked to Reddit and the Aston Villa stars will be seriously out of pocket this season.

The Liverpool legend will tiptoe his side with his long list of offenses wherever they go.

Arriving late for practice after Stevie G’s whistle at the start of the day will result in a £500 penalty.

But Gerrard’s code also contains some somewhat unusual crimes.

One of these costs £50 a day every time a member of the team forgets to bring cake for someone’s birthday.

And Gerrard is clearly concerned about his players slipping in the shower – it’s a £100 fine for anyone not wearing them FLIP FLOP in there.

If that’s not enough to empty his stars’ wallets, being late to a team manager or a meeting will cost them £200… PER MINUTE.

Whilst the same offense on a matchday results in a £1,000 fine.

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Careless players who leave their snus – a type of chewing tobacco – lying around face the consequences – worth £200 to be precise.

Gerrard’s stars can’t even outrun him in gameplay.

Being booked for dissent means they have to shell out £200, although that’s not as bad as the penalty for being sent off.

Whoever gets a red card has to take the whole team out to dinner – within four weeks of receiving the marching orders.

Gerrard is apparently keen to run a tight ship, with multiple penalties for those who are particularly messy.

Leaving equipment on the training field or leaving cutlery at the table in the canteen costs £100 each.

The Villa stars will also have to be careful about where they park their cars – unlike Newcastle star Allan Saint Maximin – as illegal parking at or outside of football will also cost them £100.

Other fines include failing to report a new injury to the team doctor by 10am, forgetting to use GPS for training, forgetting to bring recovery leggings and wearing the wrong attire on match day.

If they’re late for a commercial appearance, their profits from it will shrink too – because it will cost them £250.

And while it won’t cost them financially, if they’re voted the worst player in practice the day before a game, they’ll wear a sweater that says “I was the worst manager” the day before the next game.

But if you think Gerrard’s fines are harsh, those of his former England team-mate Frank Lampard when he was at Chelsea are even harsher.

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Steven Gerrard’s brutal fines for Aston Villa stars have been revealed, including forgetting birthday cake and flip flops in the shower

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Long US Dollar Still Most Crowded Trade – BofA Fund Manager Survey

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Video: Bitcoin Runs Higher With Sentiment Risk. What Are The Upside Hurdles Ahead?

  • Investor sentiment remains bearish in August
  • But more “apocalyptically bearish” on inflation hopes, rate shocks may end in coming quarters
  • Long USD remains the most crowded trade
  • Uninvested cash levels drop to 5.7% from 6.1% in July, but ‘still very high’

Some results from the latest BofA Global Fund Manager Survey for the month of August. Interestingly, most respondents noted that current sentiment is still too bearish for an immediate reversal and they remain “patient bears”. On top of that, investors staying long on the dollar speaks to overall market sentiment as recession risks are heightened and the Fed’s pivot is still off limits.

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An online dater is associated with an actual crush

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A Wonderful Guy Might Not Be A Good Match

Dear Amy: What’s the right way to handle being matched on a dating site with someone you’ve already met in person?

I am 51 years old, professionally successful and single.

I recently matched a man online that I met through a networking opportunity a few years ago.

He helped coordinate my interviews at the company he worked for.

Right before the pandemic, he suggested we finally meet in person, because my interviews had gone well, and even though they didn’t hire me for this position, he wanted to stay in touch.

We met for coffee and had a good chat.

From a networking perspective, it was a success. He was also one of the nicest, most attractive men I’ve ever met – honestly, it was hard to concentrate.

I haven’t had any contact with him since, more than two years ago, and I was content to “match” online with him!

If he asked me, I’d be dating him in a heartbeat.

But if he’s not interested, I don’t want to ruin a professional contact.

My choices are: I can’t do anything.

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Mike Preston: Rookie WR Shemar Bridges starred in the Ravens’ preseason win. He has bigger goals. | COMMENTARY

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Mike Preston: Rookie Wr Shemar Bridges Starred In The Ravens’ Preseason Win. He Has Bigger Goals. | Commentary

Undrafted wide receiver Shemar Bridges generated some buzz Thursday night with his outstanding performance against the Tennessee Titans in the preseason opener, but it’s just part of his long journey to the NFL.

The 6-foot-4, 207-pound rookie out of Division II Fort Valley State finished with four catches for 62 yards, including a leaping 38-yard catch and a 14-yard touchdown grab.

Finally, the Ravens had a receiver who could make acrobatic catches and not fall down when he caught a pass over the middle, or bolt for the sidelines.

But Thursday night was only a glimpse of Bridges’ potential. He is basically still a raw talent.

“He’s a good young prospect that’s really flashing,” said Ravens offensive coordinator Greg Roman. “All of those young guys, they’re working every day on those different tools, and I think he is a very diligent worker. Everyone has room for improvement, but I’m really happy with where he is at and what he’s shown so far.

“But he’s right at the beginning of his journey, so there is a lot of work to be done yet, and a lot of experience to be had. But he’s doing a nice job.”

Those words might be disheartening for some young players, but not Bridges. Despite his speed, large frame, strong hands and leaping ability, he needs to improve on his route running and hand placement. He’s getting too extended and his hands are too far away from his body when catching the ball.

Bridges, though, likes the challenge. He attended The Potter’s House High School, a small Christian Academy in Jacksonville not known for turning out college football players. He eventually went to Tusculum University in Tennessee before transferring to Fort Valley State, a historically Black university in Georgia.

Bridges, 24, appeared in only 16 games at Fort Valley State because his seasons were cut short by coronavirus concerns and injuries, but he still had 98 career receptions for 1,358 yard and seven touchdowns.

That wasn’t enough to get him invited to the annual NFL Scouting Combine, but it was enough for the Ravens to offer him a tryout in training camp — some teams only offered him a brief look in minicamps.

“I came out of high school as a late bloomer and once I got to Fort Valley, we had the COVID issues, so I thought it would be better for me to wait and put in another year,” said Bridges. “It took me a little longer to get here but I’m just happy to be here. I appreciate everything I went through because it made me stronger.

“Some ups and downs, some bumpy roads, but God blessed me to be here. I give all the glory to my Lord and savior Jesus Christ that I’m here. I’m just thankful for the Ravens for giving me an opportunity. I’m just trying to make the most of it.”

Bridges’ successes in training camp have outweighed his setbacks. Like most young players, there is a constant battle between fatigue and focus, and he’s dropped a few passes. He also needs to be smoother going in and out of breaks.

There is potential for Bridges to be that “big-body” wideout. He uses his body like a power forward or former Ravens receiver Anquan Boldin. You get position and shield the ball away from defenders.

Then there is the vertical leap, which is harder than most people realize. It’s not just about positioning but timing the jump and having the finger strength to bring it down. It could be a luxury for the Ravens, whose starting receivers, on average, are about 6 feet tall.

Every quarterback loves a big receiver in the red zone. In college, Bridges had only one coach. In Baltimore, he has two positional coaches in wide receivers coach Tee Martin and the highly animated Keith Williams, the team’s pass game specialist. Both have hastened Bridges’ development.

“They treat you like regular guys. They can get on you in the room, but you can also sit with them, laugh and joke,” Bridges said. “They are very personal.

“I feel like I’m a big receiver who can play big. But also, I feel like I’m learning how to run routes and being able to be flexible and versatile with my size, to catch over people and to box people out.”

The key to Bridges making the final roster could come down to him playing on special teams. If he is a second- or third-team receiver, he has to be able to contribute in some other way like former Ravens receiver Miles Boykin, who was a gunner on the punt team. The Ravens are leaving Bridges an option.

“It’s like all the young guys; he has got to come out here, and he’s just got to compete,” said special teams coach Chris Horton. “Shemar, he has done a good job, and we’ve got to just find ways to put him in the right position and just let him go play. But he’ll get a chance to showcase his skills [as a gunner]. He’s just got to keep working.”

Oh, he will. Bridges doesn’t know any other way. His journey will be nearly complete if he makes the initial 53-man roster.

“I just have to keep grinding and keep working,” he said. “And, stay humble.”

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8 Brides From The Stoneberg Family Have Worn This Wedding Dress

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8 Brides From The Stoneberg Family Have Worn This Wedding Dress
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Adele Larson Stoneberg tried on a white satin wedding dress at the Marshall Field department store in downtown Chicago and decided the dress, which cost $100, was the one.

It was perfect for a bride in 1950, and it turned out pretty much every decade after that.

First, Stoneberg lent it to his two sisters for their weddings. Then, over the years, his daughter and three nieces asked if they could wear it while walking down the aisle.

And this month – 72 years after Stoneberg married at the Ebenezer Lutheran Church – his granddaughter Serena Stoneberg Lipari wore the same dress to the same Chicago church for her Aug. 5 wedding.

“There was no doubt that I would become the eighth bride to wear the dress,” Lipari, 27, said of the long-sleeved gown with a long train, high neck and tiny, sleek buttons down the back.

Lipari’s grandmother is now deceased, but relatives on the pews included an aunt, her great-aunts and several cousins ​​who had each taken turns wearing Adele’s classic dress.

“When I started walking down the aisle and thought of my grandmother also wearing the dress, the emotion hit me,” Lipari said. “I felt a special connection with her on my wedding day.”

The Stoneberg family’s wedding dress tradition began when Adele Larson, then 21, got engaged to Roy Stoneberg in 1950 and took a trip with her mother, Anna Larson, to the eighth bridal shop. floor of Marshall Field to try on dresses.

“The dress she chose was well-made and timeless,” said Adele’s sister, Eleanor “Elly” Larson Milton, 90, who was the bridesmaid at the wedding.

A dog had disappeared. The cavers found it two months later 500 feet underground.

“It’s a very classic dress, with a beautiful bodice, mandarin collar and lots of buttons,” she said. “When you touch this high quality satin, you realize it is way above average.”

When it came time for Milton to get married in Chicago in 1953, she knew exactly what she wanted to wear.

“My mother took great care of the dress and stored it in an airtight box,” she said. “It never occurred to me not to wear it. It was perfect in every way.”

After Milton’s wedding, the dress was professionally cleaned and stored again, this time for 16 years.

Milton’s sister, Sharon Larson Frank, decided to unbox it and continue the family tradition in 1969 when she married John Frank.

“Our mother never told us we had to wear the dress – it just evolved,” Frank, 77, said.

Brides wear black. I did this years ago and I have no regrets.

“It’s a traditional dress, and we could all adapt it with a few minor adjustments,” she said. “When my mom offered to take me shopping for another dress, I immediately said, ‘No, I’d like to wear this one. ”

After the wedding, the dress was put away again until Adele Stoneberg’s daughter, Sue Stoneberg McCarthy, married Robert McCarthy in 1982.

McCarthy, now 66, said she added her own little touches to make the dress her own.

“We all had our own veils, bouquets and jewelry, and our individual personalities shone through as we walked down the aisle on our wedding day,” she said.

“Wearing this beautiful dress on my special day made me feel close to my mom and aunts,” McCarthy said.

In 1990, the dress was carefully removed from its storage box for the fifth time so that Eleanor Milton’s daughter, Carole Milton Zmuda, could wear it at her wedding to Lawrence Zmuda.

She said she had long admired the dress since she was a bridesmaid at her Aunt Sharon’s wedding.

She gave away her wedding dress on Facebook. Soon others did the same.

“I decided to unbutton the neckline, but it was otherwise perfect,” said Zmuda, 61, who now lives in Great Falls, Va.

“When I look back, I always had a feeling growing up that I was going to wear this dress,” she said.

His sister Jean Milton Ellis was the next to wear it, when she married in 1991 to Tom Ellis.

Ellis, 66, from Westford, Mass., said she has fond memories of meeting her grandmother, aunts and cousins for turkey sandwiches and Frango Mint Pie in Marshall Field’s Walnut Room before the store was acquired by Macy’s in 2006.

“I felt honored and privileged to wear [my aunt Adele’s] beautiful dress,” Ellis said, noting that her aunt died about three years before her wedding.

“I grew up seeing pictures of my loved ones in the dress, so I was proud to do the same,” she said. “It’s as classic today as it was in 1950.”

His cousin, Julie Frank Mackey, became the seventh bride to don the satin dress, in 2013, for her wedding to Tom Mackey.

“I am significantly taller than the other brides, so my mother [Sharon] added a wide ribbon at the hem and lengthened my veil to hide the bodice adjustments,” said Mackey, 42, who lives in Manchester, Vermont.

“We’ve all been lucky because it suits us pretty well,” she added. “The dress deeply connects all the women in our family.”

It was a touching moment this month to see her cousin Serena walking down the same aisle of the same church her mother and aunts were married in, she said.

“Everyone who got married in the dress had a lasting, healthy marriage, so we like to think it’s good luck,” Mackey said. “We hope to continue to preserve the dress – and the tradition – for many weddings to come.”

If the wedding dress is used for another 72 years, it may be partly due to the efforts of her mother, who took care of cleaning and maintaining the dress and storing it properly.

“I keep it in a sealed box and use a small [mannequin like] shape on top to help the bodice hold its shape,” said Sharon Larson Frank.

She said there were many young female family members who could marry in their future.

While walking her dogs, she found an Olympic gold medal on the ground

“Of course they won’t be required to wear the dress,” Larson Frank said with a laugh. “We don’t want them to feel any pressure.”

But if they’re wearing the family wedding dress, they’ll likely buy — or perhaps borrow — a dress for their reception.

“We now have an unwritten rule that no one wears the dress to their reception,” Larson Frank said. “To avoid stains.

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After a major renovation, the Windsor hotel that served the homeless during the pandemic reopens to the public

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After A Major Renovation, The Windsor Hotel That Served The Homeless During The Pandemic Reopens To The Public

WINDSOR (KPIX) – After months of providing accommodation for the homeless during the pandemic, a hotel in Windsor has undergone a massive renovation. Now it has reopened but owners now face a different set of challenges.

The Windsor Holiday Inn opened in 2017. First it faced the threat of wildfires, then in 2020 business plummeted at the onset of the pandemic.

That’s when the landlords and Sonoma County reached an agreement to rent rooms to the homeless community.

“Very, very hesitant to want to go this direction, but it was just one of the possible ways to get through this time,” said Nick Desai Jr., General Manager/Owner of Holiday Inn Windsor Wine Country.

Desai saw occupancy rates fall below 10% after the pandemic began. Not only did he face the possibility of huge financial losses, but he knew he would have to lay off employees. The family then took an unconventional step to keep the business going.

“For us, we know we’ve done a good thing for the community. We know we’ve done a good thing for ourselves and our staff. We met this facility afloat and we were able to open it again to the public,” says Desai.

About half of the 100 rooms were rented out to those who were homeless during the pandemic. Once the contract was completed with the county, the next hurdle appeared.

“In 6 weeks, we transformed this whole place back into a hotel, restaurant and bar,” Desai said.

Everything in the hotel has been steam cleaned. Mattresses, bedding and carpets have been replaced. Many inspections were carried out before reopening to the public.

Was there some kind of fear about how people would perceive this property?

“There were and still are,” Desail said.

It was a risk Desai was willing to take knowing that it would take time to change some people’s perceptions. He says if given the opportunity again, he would make the same decision knowing he was able to help some of the most vulnerable people in the community during the pandemic.

“Yes, there are people who will take it for granted, but the majority of them were working people who just couldn’t afford housing in this neighborhood.”

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ASK IRA: Is Jimmy Butler at power forward a potential Heat solution?

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Ask Ira: Is Jimmy Butler At Power Forward A Potential Heat Solution?

Q: I can see a lot of variations from Erik Spoelstra on both the guard spots, testing Jimmy Butler at power forward, testing Omer Yurtseven at starting center, with Bam Adebayo at the power forward – Moodi.

A: The idea of Jimmy Butler taking significant minutes at power forward has been floated since P.J. Tucker departed and no replacement was added And, yes, in many permutations, it certainly could work, particularly as teams downsize later in games. The question, though, comes down to Jimmy and how much he would be willing to play at the four, banging against bigger players. But it would be a means of unlocking more of the Heat’s perimeter potential in Kyle Lowry, Tyler Herro, Victor Oladipo, and even Max Strus, Gabe Vincent and Duncan Robinson. Jimmy at the four can get three of those others on the court at the same time.

Q: Omer Yurtseven appears to be putting in quite a bit of work at AmericanAirlines Arena. – Lash.

A: Actually, the work has been at FTX Arena (same place, different name). But, yes, his effort has been noticeable, and he certainly has made it noticeable with his posts on social media. Both efforts (the work and the publicizing of the work) appear to come with intent on putting pressure on Erik Spoelstra for playing time. Omer Yurtseven’s role will be one of the more intriguing elements of training camp, including how he is utilized in various rotations.

Q: Retiring numbers is usually for people who spend the majority of their careers on said team. People who when you think of them, it’s in that team’s jersey. With the way people switch teams now, retiring every jersey for every star who won a title with them would be crazy. – D.S.

A: This was in response to the likelihood of the Heat retiring LeBron James’ No. 6 in addition to the Heat and the rest of the league retiring No. 6 for Bill Russell. The issue here is precedent. The Heat retired Shaquille O’Neal’s No. 32 after he spent 3 1/2 seasons with the Heat, went to the NBA Finals once, and won one title with the team. So if you do that, how do you not honor No. 6 after James spent four full seasons with the team, went to four NBA Finals and won title titles? As with various halls of fame, once precedent is set, it is difficult, if not impossible, to walk back the standards.

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