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Deadline looms for Marine on St. Croix charter school meant to replace closed elementary

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Kids On Stage In Costume.

From posting recruitment videos on social media to manning a booth at the Scandia Farmers Market, Marine Village School officials are making a last-ditch effort this week to attract students to Marine on St. Croix’s new charter school.

In order for the school to open on Sept. 6, the school must have 30 students registered by Sunday.

As of Wednesday, the school had half that number.

Principal Kim Kokx, who started on July 1, said 29 students have enrolled in Marine Village School, but only 14 had submitted official registration forms as of Wednesday afternoon. She and other school officials have been calling, texting and emailing families to remind them of the deadline, she said.

“I live on the side of optimism,” Kokx said. “As far as I’m concerned, we are full steam ahead, and Sept. 6 is going to be a beautiful, fabulous day of kiddos laughing on the playground. We’re going to push forward.”

Marine Elementary School was one of three elementary schools that the Stillwater school board voted in March 2016 to close. After the closures of Marine, Withrow and Oak Park elementary schools, parents protested, lawsuits were filed, and board incumbents were challenged in elections.

The city of Marine on St. Croix bought the former Marine Elementary building for $910,000 in 2018 and is leasing it to the Marine Village School and the Marine Folk School; the folk school uses the space on nights and weekends.

The Marine Village School board set a budget for the school year based on a projected enrollment of 86 students and planned to pay the city more than $87,000 a year in rent for the fiscal year running from July 1 to June 30, 2023, said Board Chairman Win Miller.

But numbers came in lower than expected and dropped even more after it was announced that the school did not have enough students enrolled to provide transportation; the cutoff number for busing is 80 students, Kokx said.

Because of the low enrollment numbers, the board recently asked the Marine City Council to cut their rent in half – to $43,800 a year. The council agreed.

Mayor Kevin Nyenhuis said the council feels it is important to have a school in Marine. “This is the building’s intended purpose, and we have kept the faith,” he said. “The council is in support of the school board, and we have partnered with them as best as a government body can.”

But, Nyenhuis added, “at a certain point our job is to protect the assets of our citizens. We hope we don’t have to come to a harder conversation. The seats that we fill, it’s not always easy. We still have a bond payment to make.”

Not receiving expected rent money from the school “cuts into the city’s ability to do road work, public safety and other things,” he said.

ECOLOGY AND COMMUNITY

The charter school, which will have a focus on ecology and community, has attracted students from Marine, Scandia, Forest Lake, Stillwater, Oak Park Heights and Bayport, Kokx said.

Among the attractions: small class sizes, an outdoor classroom, STEM space, maker space, before- and after-school care, and “Spanish taught to every student every day,” she said.

Plans call for three classrooms – Kindergarten, grades 1-2, and grades 3-4 – with an average classroom size of 10 to 12 students. The school day is expected to run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. “It’s basically a private-school education with a public-school price tag,” she said.

Added Miller: “There’s no better place to teach ecology than in the forest and streams of Marine on St. Croix.”

Last week, the school hosted a free weeklong theater camp for 42 kids in the hopes of attracting students. It culminated in a performance of “Willy Wonka” on Friday night that more than 200 people attended, Miller said.

Pearl Guinee, from left, Eli Argetsinger, Odin Brekke and Knox Duley perform in “Willy Wonka” at Marine Village School on Friday, July 22, 2022. The charter school offered the free theater camp in the hopes of attracting new students. (Courtesy of Marine Village School)

“It was just like the good old days,” Miller said. “The energy was there in the school with the kids and parents and families really enjoying themselves and doing a wonderful job of putting on a show. We’re very encouraged.”

SUNDAY DEADLINE

Minnesota state law requires an authorizing body to ensure a charter school abides by its charter contract and follows all state laws. The Marine Village School’s authorizing body is the Minnesota Office of Charter Authorizing. Authorizing bodies such as MOChA usually charge the schools small percentage fees based on state per-student aid; the Marine Village School expects to get about $10,100 per pupil per year in funding, Miller said.

If the Marine Village School fails to register 30 students by Sunday, MOChA’s board will meet next week to decide the school’s fate, said Dave Peterson, chairman of MOChA’s board of directors.

“They are working diligently to meet that number,” he said. “We are very hopeful that the enrollment goals will be met, and that the school will open.”

Miller, the board chair, said he believes that MOChA will let the school open even if they don’t reach the magic number by Sunday.

“I believe they will look at the data that we have and the probability of getting to 30 and take into account the substantial financial support that we have in the community and that we therefore can open,” he said. “I believe that we can convince them to let us start with less than 30.

“This start-up year is difficult because it’s hard to get kids to change schools,” he said. “We believe we will build on our start, and in a period of three to five years, there will be over 100 kids in the school and maybe approaching 150, which is the maximum that we can have.”

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AUDUSD is testing its 100-day MA/key swing zone. Will sellers bend over?

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Audusd Is Testing Its 100-Day Ma/Key Swing Zone. Will Sellers Bend Over?

AUDUSD tests its 100-day moving average

Looking at the daily chart, the price is rising to test its 100-day moving average currently down at 0.70895. The high price just reached 0.70866 just below this level. The price is currently trading at 0.7082.

Near this area is also a swing zone between 0.7068 and 0.7094. Moving above all of these levels would increase the bullish bias and prompt traders to look to the 200-day moving average at 0.71522 as the next key target on the daily chart.

On the downside, the pair also broke above the 38.2% retracement of the downward move from the April high to the July low today. This level sits at 0.70552 and represents nearby support on a downside. Move below and there might be some disappointment in the inability to crack above the upper targets and stay above the broken 38.2% retracement level.

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10 Thoughts From Dolphin Camp – The depth chart is telling; Roquan Smith on the market; Patriots offense in trouble; Did Robert Kraft ask for a tampering penalty? – Denver Post

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10 Thoughts From Dolphin Camp - The Depth Chart Is Telling; Roquan Smith On The Market; Patriots Offense In Trouble; Did Robert Kraft Ask For A Tampering Penalty? – Denver Post

Here are 10 observations from the first two weeks of Miami Dolphins training camp:

1. Linebackers were the most interesting unit of the first depth map of the Dolphins. Melvin Ingram is listed as an outside starter on Andrew Van Ginkel. It does not matter because both will play. The point here is that they like Ingram just as much, although the more important point is whether the August Ingram will be the same as the December and January Ingram. He is 33 years old and has a history of injuries. He’s had stoppages at two top-tier franchises, Pittsburgh and Kansas City, the past two seasons and hasn’t stuck. But if the Dolphins are closing in on the Chargers’ Melvin Ingram, they’ve found someone valuable. It could be one of those uncertain signings that become important in retrospect. We’re still in the message-sending part of an NFL, so we don’t know if the message from the Dolphins is that they love Ingram that much or want to push Van Ginkel. Maybe both?

2. Roquan Smith asks the Chicago Bears to trade him, and every team in the league will eject the tires of a deal for the 2018 No. 1 draft pick. He’s 25, a versatile linebacker and second-team All-Pro last year. These kind of players don’t come on the market very often. They are expensive too. The Dolphins face the ceiling next year, but that stuff can be turned into work. Compensation? This is where it gets complicated. The Dolphins sent a lot of picks for Tyreek Hill and lost a future first and third round to their tampering penalty. They could use a hard-hitting linebacker like this – who couldn’t? But gathering enough resources for a trade of this magnitude would be problematic.

3. A follow-up on the Dolphins penalty for recruiting Tom Brady at the time from New England and Sean Payton from New Orleans:

A. Did New England owner Robert Kraft push the NFL to penalize the Dolphins, as a league source suggests? It’s unclear how much of an influence his voice had on the proceedings, but you can understand Kraft’s anger upon realizing Dolphins-in-waiting owner Bruce Beale signed Brady in his senior year from the Patriots in 2019. Still, for a tampering of historic significance, according to the NFL commissioner, being penalized with a 2023 first-round pick and a 2024 third-round pick isn’t a staggering penalty. Why wasn’t it more? Maybe because every team falsifies. The league has had to deal with a flood of cases. Of course, no team has done it as brazenly as the Dolphins in this case. That’s the problem here – they don’t know how to populate or alter accepted parameters.

B. The league source also offered what he says is a ‘league-wide belief’: ‘The fact that Don Yee was Brady’s agent and Payton says he told their story on tampering provided they don’t suffer any penalty or even rebuke from the league. That’s the other half of this story. How do you handle if a contracted player argues with a team? Is it allowed? obviously it does.

4. One month after the 9/11 opening at Hard Rock Stadium, let’s take a look at what the New England offense looks like with Matt Patricia and Joe Judge in some undefined roles to lead it. Take this from longtime Patriots reporter Greg Bedard:

“Hands down the worst attacking start in camp,” he tweeted from Monday’s practice before listing the plays: “False start 77, Stuff Incomplete, Stuff at handoff, Sack Flat 1yd would have been blown if live, Incomplete, Sack on a waggle 1 yard pass blasted by Wilson, Stuff 5 yard flat for Meyers.

And ESPN’s Mike Reiss: “A thought after watching the Patriots offense look effective at 7-on-7 but notably struggle in several 11-on-11s: It might be time to give (legendary Patriots offensive line coach ) Dante Scarnecchia a call for an independent assessment.

Here’s the counter-read to this: The Patriots’ defense has to be great?

5. If the dolphins even get something substantial in a trade for Preston Williams, managing director Chris Grier is the first manager of the year. Is there really a market for a player who went undrafted, played in half the games in three years due to injury, and had a catch for seven yards in 2021? The Dolphins made him compete for a job for the first time since his rookie training camp. The results speak. So, yeah, listing him as a second team is either to bolster his (cough) business value or…

6. It’s a statement of how thin this Dolphins receiving body is. Remember when general manager Jeff Ireland said on HBO Hard Knocks that he had “four, five and six” in his receiving squad but needed to find “ones, twos and threes?” This is the reverse problem. Tyreek Hill and Jaylen Waddle are the No. 1 receivers. Cedric Wilson is No. 3, and it looks like rookie Eric Ezukanma is No. 4 in training camp. Undrafted rookie Braylon Sanders looks like a player you want to develop into the practice squad. But then? What about Lynn Bowden Jr., River Cracraft and Trent Sherfield? A team usually has a wide receiver on special teams and that could be Cracraft. Let’s also remember that there haven’t been any hits on the receivers yet, so this is a position that may be overemphasized in summer practices.

7. High-end talent and good camp work of this list is obvious and commendable. The depth of this roster is the concern – just as it is with many teams now. The healthiest team often wins. It’s not just the offensive line and receivers where the Dolphins need to look for help. Look at the cornerback. Xavien Howard and Byron Jones are as good a unit as any team. Nik Needham is a solid third cornerback. But after that? Noah Igbinoghene is listed as the fourth cornerback and he was unable to enter the field his first two years. Has he progressed so much? Maybe. The saying in football is that you can never have enough attacking tackles and cornerbacks. The Dolphins need to be on the hunt for cornerbacks, just like many teams are.

8. The three players the Dolphins can’t lose this season: Hill, cornerback Xavien Howard and left tackle Terron Armstead. Hill is the most dynamic player on the team, maybe in the league. Howard is not only a game-changer, but frees up the defense to do a lot of things. Armstead is the anchor on an offensive line. It’s not just their talent, however. Again, it’s depth. Look at the line. There are three questionable players in new positions: center Connor Williams, right tackle Austin Jackson and left guard Liam Eichenberg. Armstead is the sure thing.

9. That said, remember when the Dolphins were constantly juggling players across the offensive line last training camp? Eichenberg started at right tackle, moved to guard, then had time at left tackle. His head must have been spinning. This coaching staff made decisions about where to place players and let players sink or swim in those positions all summer. We’ll see how it goes in combined training with Tampa Bay and preseason. But keeping players in a primary position gives them the best chance of succeeding.

10. Notes:

A. Speaking of the Patriots camp, DeVante Parker is listed as a second-team receiver. That can’t be why they traded him, but Parker was among the worst receivers to be let go in the past three years. His only big year came when Ryan Fitzpatrick threw jump balls at him. He can get them. The question is do you want a one-turn receiver like this.

B. Which team will sign former Cleveland center JC Tretter?

C. Tackle Mekhi Becton suffering from a knee injury that knocked him out last season is just about the worst news the New York Jets could have in August.

D. The fun part of summer is that young players take developmental steps. That’s why hope and optimism are blooming in almost every team right now. Mike McDaniel has done a great job of changing the feeling around this team to one of hope and optimism. But with the combined training in Tampa and the preseason, we’ll start to get a better sense of the milestones some players have gone through.

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Nitish Kumar didn’t want to become CM in 2020, BJP did it with force: JD(U) National Chairman

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Nitish Kumar Didn'T Want To Become Cm In 2020, Bjp Did It With Force: Jd(U) National Chairman

Nitish Kumar was sworn in as Bihar’s chief minister for the eighth time on Wednesday, while Tejashwi Yadav, leader of Rashtriya Janata Dal and son of Lalu Prasad Yadav, was sworn in as deputy CM.

Patna: Nitish Kumar did not want to become chief minister in 2020, but the BJP forcibly made him the CM, JD(U) National Chairman Rajiv Ranjan Singh claimed on Wednesday.

This came after Nitish Kumar was sworn in as Bihar’s chief minister for the eighth time on Wednesday, while Tejashwi Yadav, leader of the Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD) and son of Lalu Prasad Yadav, was sworn in in as Deputy CM.

“Nitish Kumar didn’t want to become a CM in 2020 but you (BJP) made him CM by force… RCP Singh came to JDU as an agent of BJP. You (BJP) did not follow the coalition dharma. We are not afraid of Income Tax, CBI and ED,” Rajiv Ranjan said.

After the swearing in, Kumar and Tejashwi greeted each other. RJD leader and now Bihar Deputy Chief Minister Tejashwi also touches the feet of the Kumar asking for blessings.

Notably, after Kumar broke the alliance with the BJP on Tuesday, the party accused him of being a “habitual traitor”.

(With agency contributions)

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Hyde10: 10 Dolphins camp thoughts — Depth chart is telling; Roquan Smith on market; Patriots offense struggling; Did Robert Kraft push for tampering penalty?

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Hyde10: 10 Dolphins Camp Thoughts —  Depth Chart Is Telling; Patriots Offense Struggling; Did Robert Kraft Push For  Tampering Penalty?

Here are 10 observations from the first two weeks of Miami Dolphins training camp:

1. The linebackers were the most interesting unit of the first Dolphins’ depth chart. Melvin Ingram is listed as an outside starter over Andrew Van Ginkel. That’s not a big deal as both will play. The point here is they like Ingram this much, though the larger point is to ask if the Ingram of August will be the same as the Ingram of December and January. He’s 33 with a history of injuries. He had stops at two blue-chip franchises, Pittsburgh and Kansas City, the last two seasons and didn’t stick. But if the Dolphins get anything close to the Melvin Ingram of the Chargers then they have found someone valuable. This could be one of those uncertain signings that becomes big in retrospect. We’re still in the message-sending part of an NFL, so we don’t know if the Dolphins’ message is they like Ingram this much or want to push Van Ginkel. Maybe both?

2. Roquan Smith is asking the Chicago Bears to trade him, and every team in the league will kick the tires of a deal for the first-round draft pick in 2018. He’s 25, a versatile linebacker and second-team All-Pro last year. Those kind of players don’t come on the market very often. They’re expensive, too. The Dolphins are up against the cap next year, but those type of things can be massaged into working. Compensation? That’s where it gets tricky. The Dolphins sent a lot of picks for Tyreek Hill and lost a future first- and third-rounder due to their tampering penalty. They could use an impactful linebacker like this — who couldn’t? But assembling enough resources for a trade of this magnitude would be problematic.

3. A follow-up regarding the Dolphins’ penalty for recruiting Tom Brady back to his New England days and Sean Payton from New Orleans:

A. Did New England owner Robert Kraft push the NFL to penalize the Dolphins, as a league source suggests? It’s unclear how much sway his voice had in the proceedings, but you can understand Kraft’s anger at realizing Dolphins owner-in-waiting Bruce Beale recruiting Brady during his final Patriots year in 2019. Still, for tampering that was historic in scope, according to the NFL Commissioner, being penalized a first-round pick in 2023 and a third-round pick in 2024 isn’t a staggering penalty. Why wasn’t it more? Maybe because every team tampers. The league had to be concerned with a flood of cases. Of course, no team has done it as brazenly as the Dolphins in this instance. That’s the concern here – they don’t know how to tank or tamper within the accepted parameters.

B. The league source also offered what he says is a “league-wide belief:” The fact Don Yee was the agent of both Brady and Payton says he told their story on the tampering on the condition they’d suffer no penalties or even reproachment from the league. That’s the other half of this story. How do you handle if a player under contract talks with a team? Is that allowed? Evidently it is.

4. A month from the Sept. 11 opener at Hard Rock Stadium, let’s look in at how the New England offense looks with Matt Patricia and Joe Judge in some undefined roles of running it. Take this from long-time Patriots reporter Greg Bedard:

“Arguably worst start of offense to camp,’’ he tweeted from Monday’s practice before listing the plays: “False start 77, Stuff Incomplete, Stuff at handoff, Sack Flat 1yd would have been blown up if live, Incomplete, Sack on a waggle 1 yard pass blown up by Wilson, Stuff 5 yards flat to Meyers.”

And ESPN’s Mike Reiss: “A thought after watching the Patriots offense look efficient in 7-on-7 but struggle notably in multiple 11-on-11s: Might be time to give (legendary Patriots offensive line coach) Dante Scarnecchia a call for an independent evaluation.”

Here’s the counter-read to this: The Patriots defense must be great?

5. If the Dolphins even get anything of substance in a trade for Preston Williams, GM Chris Grier is the early leader for executive of the year. Is there really a market for a player who went undrafted, has played half the games in three years due to injury and had one catch for seven yards in 2021? The Dolphins had him compete for a job for the first time since his rookie training camp. The results are speaking. So, yeah, listing him as second team is either to bolster his (cough) trade value or …

6. It’s a statement of how thin this Dolphins receiving corps is. Remember when GM Jeff Ireland said on HBO’s Hard Knocks he has, “fours, fives and sixes,” in his receiving group but needed to find some “ones, twos and threes?” It’s about the opposite issue here. Tyreek Hill and Jaylen Waddle are No. 1 receivers. Cedric Wilson is No. 3, and it seems rookie Eric Ezukanma is No. 4 in training camp.. Undrafted rookie Braylon Sanders sounds like a player you want on the practice squad to develop. But then? What to think of Lynn Bowden Jr., River Cracraft and Trent Sherfield? A team typcially has a wide receiver on special teams and that could be Cracraft. Let’s also remember there’s been no hitting of receivers just yet so this is a position that can be overrated in summer workouts.

7. The top-end talent and good camp work of this roster is apparent and commendable. The depth of this roster is the concern — just as it is in many teams by now. The healthiest team often wins. It’s not just the offensive line and receivers where the Dolphins must look for help. Look at cornerback. Xavien Howard and Byron Jones are as good a unit as any team. Nik Needham is a solid third cornerback. But after that? Noah Igbinoghene is listed as the fourth cornerback and he couldn’t get on the field his first two years. Has he improved that much? Maybe. The saying in football is you can never have enough offensive tackles and cornerbacks. The Dolphins must be looking for cornerbacks, just as many teams are.

8. The three players the Dolphins can’t lose this season: Hill, cornerback Xavien Howard and left tackle Terron Armstead. Hill is the most dynamic player on the team — maybe in the league. Howard isn’t just a game-changer but frees up the defense to do many things. Armstead is the anchor on an offensive line. It’s not just their talent, though. Again, it’s depth. Look at the line. There are three uncertain players are in new positions: center Connor Williams, right tackle Austin Jackson and left guard Liam Eichenberg. Armstead is the sure thing.

9. That said, remember when the Dolphins constantly juggled players across the offensive line all last training camp? Eichenberg started at right tackle, moved to guard, then had time at left tackle. His head had to be spinning. This coaching staff made decisions on where to put players and is letting the players sink or swim in those positions all summer. We’ll see how it goes through combined practices with Tampa Bay and the preseason. But keeping players at one primary position gives them the best chance to succeed.

10. Notes:

A. Speaking of the Patriots camp, DeVante Parker is listed as a second-team receiver. That can’t be why they traded for him, but Parker was among the worst receivers getting separation the past three years. His one big year came when Ryan Fitzpatrick threw jump balls to him. He can get those. The question is if you want a one-trick receiver like that.

B. Which team is going to sign former Cleveland center JC Tretter?

C. Tackle Mekhi Becton suffering an injury to the knee that knocked him out last season is about the worst news the New York Jets could have in August.

D. The fun part of the summer is young players at taking developmental steps. That’s why hope and optimism bloom across almost every team right now. Mike McDaniel has done a great job of changing the feel around this team into one of that hope and optimism. But with the combined practice in Tampa and preseason, we’ll start to get a better picture of the steps some players have taken.

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Jeep has reinvented the windshield wiper. Here’s how it works

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Jeep Has Reinvented The Windshield Wiper. Here'S How It Works

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

The gas station raclette has nothing on this.

Jeep has developed a new type of wiper designed to clean dirt and mud from glass in a single pass.

The Clean Sweep: Jeep is a new accessory kit available in the Mopar Parts Catalog for current-generation Wrangler and Gladiator trucks.

The set includes new wiper arms and blades with 12 laser-cut holes that spray washer fluid as they sweep across the windshield.

JEEP NAMED MOST PATRIOTIC AUTOMOTIVE BRAND AND MANUFACTURER

Traditional spray nozzles are turned off and fluid is routed back to the blades through the tubing that comes with the package.

The Clean Sweep: Jeep system features wiper blades with 12 integrated water spray holes.
(Jeep)

When the washer is activated, fluid begins to flow before the wipers begin to move, creating a leading edge of fluid that helps clean the glass.

Jeep Claims This Feature Can Clean A Windshield Better Than A Traditional Windshield Washer System.

Jeep claims this feature can clean a windshield better than a traditional windshield washer system.
(Jeep)

Some other vehicles have spray nozzles located on the wiper arms to create a similar effect, but Jeep’s 12-hole blade design is unique.

THE JEEP WRANGLER HIGH TIDE WAS DESIGNED FOR THE BEACH

Jeep said the technology will help eliminate “blind seconds” that are often created when traditional windshield wipers smear debris on a windshield for a few passes before beginning to clean them. This is especially useful off-road for traversing the types of puddles and other mud the Wrangler and Gladiator were designed to tackle.

The Kit Comes With Two Sets Of Blades.

The kit comes with two sets of blades.
(Jeep)

The kit is available now and priced at $140, including two sets of blades.

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Jeep also touched on the subject of forward vision last year when it introduced a new line of Mopar windshields for the Wrangler and Gladiator made from the type of shatter-resistant Gorilla glass used on smartphones.

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86% of voters vote to recall Two Harbors mayor

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86% Of Voters Vote To Recall Two Harbors Mayor

TWO HARBORS — After seven months of controversy, residents voted to recall embattled Mayor Chris Swanson, ending his nearly 6-year run as mayor.

An unofficial tally of both in-person and absentee ballots, with 100% of precincts reporting, show 86% of voters voted to recall Swanson, with 1,149 voting “yes” to recall Swanson and only 180 voting “no” to keep him in office, according to the Minnesota Secretary of State website . The question on the ballot was: “Shall Mayor Christopher Swanson be recalled?”

There were 2,215 registered voters in Two Harbors as of 7 a.m., according to the Secretary of State website.

Swanson did not immediately return an email or voicemail seeking comment from the News Tribune.

Todd Ronning, chair of the Resign or Recall Committee, said the group “couldn’t be more happy with the results.”

“Our group and our community has been through a lot in the last six months,” Ronning told the News Tribune.

According to the Two Harbors City Charter , the council president will take over mayoral duties and a special election will be held during the next general election to fill the remainder of Swanson’s term, which expires January 2025. Ben Redden is the council president.

Recall efforts were spurred by Swanson’s underwater hotel and cryptocurrency pursuits in January, which brought a slew of other potential conflicts of interest and ethical concern to the surface.

Reviews of his actions have found he violated the city’s code and communications policy and was less than forthcoming with potential interests.

Two Harbors City Attorney Tim Costley in March issued a memorandum of opinion that found Swanson repeatedly used his official city position “for personal benefit or business interests” on a number of issues .

And in July, the Minnesota Office of the State Auditor found Swanson may not have disclosed all of his business and nonprofit interests before they went in front of the City Council. The auditor’s office also sided with the City Council and city attorney in their handling of the potential conflicts of interests.

“I would suggest that the actions of the City Council not only protected local citizens’ interest, but also helped protect the mayor, too,” State Auditor Julie Blaha told the News Tribune at the time. “I think he avoided some problems because (the City Council) avoided a number of contracts.”

Swanson has maintained he’s done nothing wrong and refused to resign, even after the City Council voted 6-0 in June asking him to resign. He did not attend a regularly scheduled council meeting from mid-June until Monday, when he arrived about nine minutes into the meeting, after the public comment period ended.

The Resign or Recall Committee began collecting signatures to move the recall forward in March. It needed 20%, or 498 signatures, of the city’s registered voters to sign the petition. It first gathered nearly 1,000 signatures, 735 of which were verified by the city. But the committee withdrew its petition because it had told people their signatures would be private and it learned later that would not be the case. Its second round of signatures garnered 618 signers, 532 of which were verified by the city.

“It looks like everyone who signed that petition pretty much got out and voted,” said Cynthia Kosiak, an organizer and attorney for the Resign or Recall Committee. “Which is not, generally, what happens.”

A lawsuit seeking to nullify the recall brought forward by a supporter of Swanson, who was represented by Swanson’s attorney, against the city and recall committee was dismissed in June.

The city spent $35,773 by bringing in outside attorneys to defend itself, Miranda Pietila, city financial director, said at the council meeting Monday.

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