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86% of voters vote to recall Two Harbors mayor

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86% Of Voters Vote To Recall Two Harbors Mayor
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TWO HARBORS — After seven months of controversy, residents voted to recall embattled Mayor Chris Swanson, ending his nearly 6-year run as mayor.

An unofficial tally of both in-person and absentee ballots, with 100% of precincts reporting, show 86% of voters voted to recall Swanson, with 1,149 voting “yes” to recall Swanson and only 180 voting “no” to keep him in office, according to the Minnesota Secretary of State website . The question on the ballot was: “Shall Mayor Christopher Swanson be recalled?”

There were 2,215 registered voters in Two Harbors as of 7 a.m., according to the Secretary of State website.

Swanson did not immediately return an email or voicemail seeking comment from the News Tribune.

Todd Ronning, chair of the Resign or Recall Committee, said the group “couldn’t be more happy with the results.”

“Our group and our community has been through a lot in the last six months,” Ronning told the News Tribune.

According to the Two Harbors City Charter , the council president will take over mayoral duties and a special election will be held during the next general election to fill the remainder of Swanson’s term, which expires January 2025. Ben Redden is the council president.

Recall efforts were spurred by Swanson’s underwater hotel and cryptocurrency pursuits in January, which brought a slew of other potential conflicts of interest and ethical concern to the surface.

Reviews of his actions have found he violated the city’s code and communications policy and was less than forthcoming with potential interests.

Two Harbors City Attorney Tim Costley in March issued a memorandum of opinion that found Swanson repeatedly used his official city position “for personal benefit or business interests” on a number of issues .

And in July, the Minnesota Office of the State Auditor found Swanson may not have disclosed all of his business and nonprofit interests before they went in front of the City Council. The auditor’s office also sided with the City Council and city attorney in their handling of the potential conflicts of interests.

“I would suggest that the actions of the City Council not only protected local citizens’ interest, but also helped protect the mayor, too,” State Auditor Julie Blaha told the News Tribune at the time. “I think he avoided some problems because (the City Council) avoided a number of contracts.”

Swanson has maintained he’s done nothing wrong and refused to resign, even after the City Council voted 6-0 in June asking him to resign. He did not attend a regularly scheduled council meeting from mid-June until Monday, when he arrived about nine minutes into the meeting, after the public comment period ended.

The Resign or Recall Committee began collecting signatures to move the recall forward in March. It needed 20%, or 498 signatures, of the city’s registered voters to sign the petition. It first gathered nearly 1,000 signatures, 735 of which were verified by the city. But the committee withdrew its petition because it had told people their signatures would be private and it learned later that would not be the case. Its second round of signatures garnered 618 signers, 532 of which were verified by the city.

“It looks like everyone who signed that petition pretty much got out and voted,” said Cynthia Kosiak, an organizer and attorney for the Resign or Recall Committee. “Which is not, generally, what happens.”

A lawsuit seeking to nullify the recall brought forward by a supporter of Swanson, who was represented by Swanson’s attorney, against the city and recall committee was dismissed in June.

The city spent $35,773 by bringing in outside attorneys to defend itself, Miranda Pietila, city financial director, said at the council meeting Monday.

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Vikings have been NFL ‘pioneers’ in playing overseas. Next stop: Back in London

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Vikings Have Been Nfl ‘Pioneers’ In Playing Overseas. Next Stop: London
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After the announcement in May that the Vikings would play the New Orleans Saints on Sunday in London, the team quickly went to work making arrangements for the trip. Plans got underway to ship food overseas, fill out customs forms, consult sleep experts for advice on adjusting to the six-hour time difference, and much more.

As far as former Minnesota tight end Steve Jordan is concerned, let’s just say such a trip was much simpler four decades ago. Jordan was on the Vikings team that defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 28-10 in an Aug. 6, 1983 exhibition that was the first NFL game played in the United Kingdom.

“We got in at like 7 in the morning and went right to a practice, and I remember being so tired when we were stretching before the practice that I literally fell asleep when I was stretching,” Jordan said.

And the food back then in London?

“Very greasy,” Jordan said.

And the beer?

“It was not cold, almost like room temperature,” he said.

Things have changed since then. NFL teams have been coming regularly to London for regular-season games since 2007, and players apparently no longer fall asleep on the field. The food is better in the city, whether teams bring their own or not. Cold beer is plentiful.

And Jordan is back in London.

Jordan, who played for the Vikings from 1982-94 and made six Pro Bowls, is the father of Saints star defensive end Cameron Jordan. He arrived in London on Thursday and will attend Sunday’s game at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium along with his daughter-in-law Nikki and grandson Tank, 7.

This is actually Jordan’s second trip back in recent years to watch a game in London, having attended the Saints’ 20-0 win over Miami in 2017. So he has some additional perspective there. And when he’s sitting in the stands Sunday, Jordan figures he will reflect on how far the NFL has come in playing international games.

“We were pioneers back in 1983,” Jordan said. “I remember the first game we played there, they would put on the scoreboard, ‘A field goal is worth three points, an extra point is one point,’ and that kind of thing. Somebody might make a diving catch and the crowd would be silent but then if somebody was blown up going across the middle, the crowd would go wild. I kind of juxtapose that with what it’s like 30-some years later.”

Now, many Brits really know their football. NFL games are show regularly on television. The internet, with social media, has aided in the continued growth of the game.

And it’s not just in the United Kingdom where interest in the NFL has blossomed, it’s in many other parts of the world. And the Vikings deserve some credit in getting it all started.

Not only did the Vikings take the field for the first game in London, they also played the first game in continental Europe, a 1988 exhibition against Chicago in Gothenburg, Sweden. They went to Germany in 1993 for a preseason game in Berlin against Buffalo and in 1994 to Japan for an exhibition against Kansas City in Tokyo. Three decades after the Vikings were in Germany, the NFL will play its first regular-season game there when Tampa Bay faces Seattle on Nov. 13 in Munich.

The Vikings on Sunday will play their third-regular season game in London over the past decade. They previously defeated Pittsburgh 34-27 in 2013 at Wembley Stadium and Cleveland 33-16 at Twickenham Stadium.

Put it all together, and the Vikings have become a popular team overseas.

“It was exciting that we went and played a football game in a country that had not seen live American football,” said Carl Lee, a Vikings defensive back from 1983-93 who played in the London game as a rookie in 1983 and later suited up for the Sweden and Germany games. “When you look back on it, I’m happy to say that I was part of the start of that, and the Vikings organization has been kind of a pioneer in overseas games.”

Lee said it helped the franchise initially gain international fans because, from a historical perspective, there always has been “kind of a mystique about Vikings.” When running back Rickey Young played in the 1983 game, he said British fans “thought we were Norsemen, like we were real Vikings from the ship.”

That game was dubbed “The Global Cup” and played at the old Wembley Stadium, which closed in 2000. A crowd 32,847, which was about half capacity, showed up. Many of the fans were curiosity seekers.

Goalposts had to be shipped in for the game, and the Vikings were responsible for bringing in the first-down chains. Minnesota equipment manager Dennis Ryan, who has been with the team since 1975, remembers players dressing in a band room at the stadium and each player got a chair for gear.

“When the truck did arrive, (then head coach Bud Grant) had the players all help us get the gear to the band room, which was at the top of the first level of Wembley Stadium,” Ryan said.

Ryan’s favorite story from that game long has been about the miscommunication with game officials when Vikings officials said their coaches needed to go to the press box at halftime. Locals in England equate the word “coach” to a bus that provides public transportation.

“They said, ‘You want your coaches up in the press box? We have an elevator, but our lift isn’t being enough for your coaches,’ ” Ryan said. “We said, ‘Well, we can take them through the stands.”

Game officials soon suggested a crane could be brought in for the Vikings’ coaches. It was then that Ryan realized “they had thought we wanted our busses up in the press box.”

Five years later, the Vikings headed to Sweden and the NFL still was trying to get a foothold in Europe. Another half-capacity crowd of 33,115 was on hand when Minnesota defeated the Bears 28-21 at Ullevi Stadium.

The stadium was named after Ull, the Vikings’ god of games, so you better believe Minnesota players got their share of publicity in Sweden because of the team’s nickname.

“The Vikings, it was like going back to your origins,” said hall of fame guard Randall McDaniel, who played for Minnesota from 1988-99 and appeared in exhibition games in Sweden, Germany and Japan. “They even took us to this old castle and it was like it was back in the days. The brought us into this room with big, giant tables and there was food sitting in the middle, and I was sitting there with a big turkey leg in my hand.”

The Swedes didn’t know much about football, and McDaniel said during the game “all they seemed to really care about was when the ball was thrown in the air.”

By the time the Vikings played in Berlin in 1993, things were starting to change overseas. The fans, aided by the NFL Europe League starting up in 1991 and having a team in Germany, began to understand the game more. A sellout crowd of 67,132 showed up to see Minnesota defeat the Bills 20-6.

What actually happened on the field, though, isn’t what former Vikings players most remember about the trip. The game was played at Berlin’s Olympic Stadium, where the 1936 Olympics were held. At those Games, legendary Black athlete Jesse Owens won four gold medals in track and field and showed up Adolf Hilter and his racist beliefs of Aryanism.

“I was in awe going to the Olympic Stadium because I actually got to meet Jesse Owens when I was a kid growing in Phoenix and he came to our church once when I was about 10,” Jordan said. “I shook his hand and got his autograph on a church program, and here I am in the stadium where Hitler was and where the Olympics were and where Jesse lit it up and made such a statement to the world.”

Vikings players had a chance to tour the city. They visited remnants of the Berlin Wall, which had been torn down in 1989.

“I don’t remember anything about that football game but I remember going to see the sights,” said Sean Salisbury, a Vikings quarterback from 1990-94. “I’m a big history buff. It hadn’t been that long since the Wall had come down, and I remember seeing pieces of brick on the streets that had been broken from when the Wall came down. It was just eerie.”

The Vikings didn’t waste any time before their next trip overseas. The following year, they traveled 6,000 miles to Tokyo, which remains the farthest they ever have gone for a game.

The Vikings defeated the Chiefs 17-9 at the Tokyo Dome before a sellout crowd of 49,555. The most popular players on the trip for the Vikings were quarterback Warren Moon and wide receiver Cris Carter, both future hall of famers. They signed numerous autographs, and Japanese fans often expressed their gratitude when they got one with a bow.

“When we would go out to eat, the chefs would come out and honor us for eating their food,” McDaniel said. “They came out and bowed and asked if we enjoyed the food.”

McDaniel did. What he didn’t enjoy was trying to adjust to a time zone 14 hours ahead.

“It was brutal,” he said.

The international trips for the Vikings now are not that long, but they are held in the regular season. And that makes a big difference.

“When we went over, it was always preseason, and we stayed longer,” McDaniel said. “There was no rush to come back. But now you fly over and then you play and then you fly back, so I don’t know if I would have liked to have gone over there for a regular-season game. That would truly have thrown my routine off.”

Mindful of not wanting that to happen to players, the Vikings flew to London on Thursday night, arrived Friday morning, and will fly home immediately after the game. Executive director of health and performance Tyler Williams said the Vikings don’t want players to fully acclimate to the six-hour time difference because they then would need to fully acclimate back, a problem since they have a game Oct. 9 against Chicago at U.S. Bank Stadium. They are staying at a hotel an hour north of central London, so there hasn’t figured to be much sightseeing.

The Vikings had bye weeks following each of their two previous regular-season Sunday games in London, so they had longer trips and got some time to see the sights. In 2013, they left on Monday night and arrived Tuesday morning.

“We went and saw the Crown Jewels and stuff,” Vikings safety Harrison Smith said. “It was cool. We saw Parliament, Big Ben and all of that.”

On Sunday, Smith will become the first Vikings player to appear in three games in London. Wide receiver Adam Thielen is the only other Minnesota player remaining from the 2013 trip, but he was then a rookie on the practice squad.

Thielen shined in London in 2017, catching five passes for 98 yards and being named Man of the Match before an enthusiastic sellout crowd of 74,237. After an 18-yard touchdown reception in the second quarter from Case Keenum, he thrilled fans with a soccer slide to celebrate.

On that trip, the Vikings departed for London on Wednesday night and arrived Thursday morning. Thielen said that gave players time to check out some pubs and go to a Premier League soccer game between Arsenal and Swansea City.

Both Smith and Thielen said football fans in England were more knowledge in 2017 than in 2013, and they are expecting to see another jump in knowledge Sunday.

“They are becoming more aware of what American football is,” Thielen said. “You could tell just from the first time to the second time, just the celebrations, the cheering was more on point.”

On Sunday, one of the fans on hand will be Jordan, who said he’ll be rooting for both teams because he “can’t lose in that situation.” Since arriving in London, he already has been talking about how far the NFL has come on an international stage since he played in that 1983 game.

“I tell people I played in the first World Bowl in Europe, and I’m pretty proud of that fact,” he said. “It was great to experience that. The Vikings have been pioneers and now the Vikings are going back to Europe again. It’s exciting, and I’m certainly looking forward to the continued progression of American football in Europe.”

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Vikings’ third London game over past decade will be in a third different stadium

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Vikings’ Third London Game Over Past Decade Will Be In A Third Different Stadium
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VIKINGS (2-1) VS. SAINTS (1-2)

Kickoff: 8:30 a.m. Sunday

Where: Tottenham Hotspur Stadium

TV: KSTP-Channel 5, NFL Network; Kevin Kugler, Mark Sanchez, Laura Okmin, Jamie Erdahl.

Radio: KFXN-FM 100.3; Paul Allen, Pete Bercich, Ben Leber

Referee: Clete Blakeman

Series: Vikings lead 23-13

Line: Vikings by 3 1/2

The Vikings play their third game in London over the past decade at a third different stadium. They defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers 34-27 in 2013 at Wembley Stadium and the Cleveland Browns 33-16 in 2017 at Twickenham Stadium. This will be their first London game on artificial turf.

With quarterback Jameis Winston listed as doubtful due to back and ankle injuries, the Saints likely will start Andy Dalton. He was Cincinnati’s quarterback in a 2016 game in London when the Bengals tied Washington 27-27. Vikings quarterback Kirk Cousins was with Washington then, and threw for 458 yards in that game, still a London record.

The Vikings are expected to have running back Dalvin Cook available after he left last Sunday’s 28-24 win over Detroit in the third quarter with a shoulder injury. But edge rusher Za’Darius Smith is listed as questionable due to a knee injury suffered in that game.

The teams last played on Christmas Day in New Orleans in 2020, when Saints running back Alvin Kamara tied an NFL record by scoring six touchdowns in a game in a 52-33 rout. Minnesota’s last two playoff wins have been over New Orleans, 29-24 in the “Minneapolis Miracle” game in January 2018 and 26-20 in overtime in January 2020.

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Spoelstra says Heat preseason to feature a variety of lineups; Lowry stresses internal growth

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Spoelstra Says Heat Preseason To Feature A Variety Of Lineups; Lowry Stresses Internal Growth
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Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra warned Friday that what you see during the preseason from his team is not what you might get when the season starts.

So, yes, those who are curious about bigger lineups, perhaps ones that feature two out of Bam Adebayo, Dewayne Dedmon and Omer Yurtseven, there will be some of that over the course of the Heat’s five-game exhibition schedule. And those seeking a three-wing smaller-ball approach, that also could come into view with Kyle Lowry, Tyler Herro and Victor Oladipo.

Basically, the laboratory will be open for experimentation.

“There’ll probably be a decent amount of that,” Spoelstra said Friday, as his team continued training camp at the Baha Mar resort. “I mean, we do that every training camp and preseason, anyway. Our versatility is a really important part of our makeup, and you have to be able to take a look at different combinations just to see what they look like against competition.

“I like the fact that we’ve had these different kinds of lineups that we can get — the big lineup, the speed lineup, the shooting lineup. So you’ll see a decent amount of those.”

Bally Sports Sun announced Friday that it would carry all five of the Heat’s exhibitions, starting with Tuesday night’s game at FTX Arena against the Minnesota Timberwolves, the first of three exhibitions next week.

Taking note

Lowry said Friday he is using training camp to go to school on improvements from within on a roster that largely returned intact.

“I think we’ve just got guys that are individually trying to get better,” he said. “I think that’s where it’s something different.

“You figure out what they got better at.”

While Lowry, 36, said the team’s veterans “are just getting our legs under us,” he said the younger players are setting the tone at practice.

“It’s tough when you’ve got a lot of veterans,” he said, “but those guys are playing extremely hard and extremely well right now.”

Included in that group is first-round pick Nikola Jovic, the lithe 19-year-old forward out of Serbia.

“He’s young,” Lowry said with a laugh. “He’s got some passion. He wants to be good. But it’s going to take time.”

Asked what would change if he were to potentially start in the backcourt alongside Herro, Lowry said, “What changes is he’s still got to be him. I think nothing changes for him. I think everybody’s got to adapt and adjust.”

Comedic interlude

Practice ended with a spirited debate between Adebayo and 42-year-old captain Udonis Haslem about which Spoelstra would trust more to take a final shot with a game on the line.

As Haslem attempted to elicit the support of the team’s younger players, Adebayo noted that Haslem has “only one shot you take,” alluding to Haslem’s trademark midrange baseline jumper.

The chiding came after a post-practice 3-point drill featuring Haslem, Adebayo and Dedmon.

End game

With Haslem having addressed this being his final training camp as he closes out his 20-year Heat career, Spoelstra said he doesn’t want to get caught up too soon in such moments.

“I don’t want to think about that right now. I don’t want to get emotional,” he said. “I already had to go through that with Dwyane [Wade]. I’m just very grateful that he’s here in our locker room.

“And in all these moments in between, that’s where UD can express his influence and his mentorship. He’s a top mentor in this entire association. He really is selfless. He really cares about the guys, and he’ll do anything to help them be their best.”

Last call

The Heat will host a clinic for invited local youth Saturday ahead of their final camp practice on the makeshift ballroom courts at the resort’s convention center, before then flying back to South Florida.

The team then will be off until Monday’s 6:30 p.m. public scrimmage at FTX Arena, before opening their preseason the following night.

All 20 players participated in Friday’s session, with no injuries reported since Tuesday’s first day of camp.

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Vikings have been NFL ‘pioneers’ in playing overseas. Next stop: London

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Vikings Have Been Nfl ‘Pioneers’ In Playing Overseas. Next Stop: London
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After the announcement in May that the Vikings would play the New Orleans Saints on Sunday in London, the team quickly went to work making arrangements for the trip. They had to to ship food overseas. Fill out customs forms. Consult sleep experts for advice on adjusting to the six-hour time difference. And so much more.

As far as former Vikings tight end Steve Jordan is concerned, let’s just say such a trip was much simpler four decades ago. Jordan was on the Vikings team that defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 28-10 in an Aug. 6, 1983 exhibition that was the first NFL game played in the United Kingdom.

“We got in at like 7 in the morning and went right to a practice, and I remember being so tired when we were stretching before the practice that I literally fell asleep when I was stretching,” Jordan said.

And the food back then in London?

“Very greasy,” Jordan said.

And the beer?

“It was not cold, almost like room temperature,” he said.

Things have changed since then. NFL teams have been coming regularly to London for regular-season games since 2007, and players apparently no longer fall asleep on the field. The food is better in the city, whether teams bring their own or not. Cold beer is plentiful.

And Jordan is back in London.

Jordan, who played for the Vikings from 1982-94 and made six Pro Bowls, is the father of Saints star defensive end Cameron Jordan. He arrived in London on Thursday and will attend Sunday’s game at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium along with his daughter-in-law Nikki and grandson Tank, 7.

This is actually Jordan’s second trip back in recent years to watch a game in London, having attended the Saints’ 20-0 win over Miami in 2017. So he has some additional perspective there. And when he’s sitting in the stands Sunday, Jordan figures he will reflect on how far the NFL has come in playing international games.

“We were pioneers back in 1983,” Jordan said. “I remember the first game we played there, they would put on the scoreboard, ‘A field goal is worth three points, an extra point is one point,’ and that kind of thing. Somebody might make a diving catch and the crowd would be silent but then if somebody was blown up going across the middle, the crowd would go wild. I kind of juxtapose that with what it’s like 30-some years later.”

Now, many Brits really know their football. NFL games are show regularly on television. The internet, with social media, has aided in the continued growth of the game.

And it’s not just in the United Kingdom where interest in the NFL has blossomed, it’s in many other parts of the world. And the Vikings deserve some credit in getting it all started.

Not only did the Vikings take the field for the first game in London, they also played the first game in continental Europe, a 1988 exhibition against Chicago in Gothenburg, Sweden. They went to Germany in 1993 for a preseason game in Berlin against Buffalo and in 1994 to Japan for an exhibition against Kansas City in Tokyo. Three decades after the Vikings were in Germany, the NFL will play its first regular-season game there when Tampa Bay faces Seattle on Nov. 13 in Munich.

The Vikings on Sunday will play their third-regular season game in London over the past decade. They previously defeated Pittsburgh 34-27 in 2013 at Wembley Stadium and Cleveland 33-16 at Twickenham Stadium.

Put it all together, and the Vikings have become a popular team overseas.

“It was exciting that we went and played a football game in a country that had not seen live American football,” said Carl Lee, a Vikings defensive back from 1983-93 who played in the London game as a rookie in 1983 and later suited up for the Sweden and Germany games. “When you look back on it, I’m happy to say that I was part of the start of that, and the Vikings organization has been kind of a pioneer in overseas games.”

Lee said it helped the franchise initially gain international fans because, from a historical perspective, there always has been “kind of a mystique about Vikings.” When running back Rickey Young played in the 1983 game, he said British fans “thought we were Norsemen, like we were real Vikings from the ship.”

That game was dubbed “The Global Cup” and played at the old Wembley Stadium, which closed in 2000. A crowd 32,847, which was about half capacity, showed up. Many of the fans were curiosity seekers.

Goalposts had to be shipped in for the game, and the Vikings were responsible for bringing in the first-down chains. Minnesota equipment manager Dennis Ryan, who has been with the team since 1975, remembers players dressing in a band room at the stadium and each player got a chair for gear.

“When the truck did arrive, (then head coach Bud Grant) had the players all help us get the gear to the band room, which was at the top of the first level of Wembley Stadium,” Ryan said.

Ryan’s favorite story from that game long has been about the miscommunication with game officials when Vikings officials said their coaches needed to go to the press box at halftime. Locals in England equate the word “coach” to a bus that provides public transportation.

“They said, ‘You want your coaches up in the press box? We have an elevator, but our lift isn’t being enough for your coaches,’ ” Ryan said. “We said, ‘Well, we can take them through the stands.”

Game officials soon suggested a crane could be brought in for the Vikings’ coaches. It was then that Ryan realized “they had thought we wanted our busses up in the press box.”

Five years later, the Vikings headed to Sweden and the NFL still was trying to get a foothold in Europe. Another half-capacity crowd of 33,115 was on hand when Minnesota defeated the Bears 28-21 at Ullevi Stadium.

The stadium was named after Ull, the Vikings’ god of games, so you better believe Minnesota players got their share of publicity in Sweden because of the team’s nickname.

“The Vikings, it was like going back to your origins,” said hall of fame guard Randall McDaniel, who played for Minnesota from 1988-99 and appeared in exhibition games in Sweden, Germany and Japan. “They even took us to this old castle and it was like it was back in the days. The brought us into this room with big, giant tables and there was food sitting in the middle, and I was sitting there with a big turkey leg in my hand.”

The Swedes didn’t know much about football, and McDaniel said during the game “all they seemed to really care about was when the ball was thrown in the air.”

By the time the Vikings played in Berlin in 1993, things were starting to change overseas. The fans, aided by the NFL Europe League starting up in 1991 and having a team in Germany, began to understand the game more. A sellout crowd of 67,132 showed up to see Minnesota defeat the Bills 20-6.

What actually happened on the field, though, isn’t what former Vikings players most remember about the trip. The game was played at Berlin’s Olympic Stadium, where the 1936 Olympics were held. At those Games, legendary Black athlete Jesse Owens won four gold medals in track and field and showed up Adolf Hilter and his racist beliefs of Aryanism.

“I was in awe going to the Olympic Stadium because I actually got to meet Jesse Owens when I was a kid growing in Phoenix and he came to our church once when I was about 10,” Jordan said. “I shook his hand and got his autograph on a church program, and here I am in the stadium where Hitler was and where the Olympics were and where Jesse lit it up and made such a statement to the world.”

Vikings players had a chance to tour the city. They visited remnants of the Berlin Wall, which had been torn down in 1989.

“I don’t remember anything about that football game but I remember going to see the sights,” said Sean Salisbury, a Vikings quarterback from 1990-94. “I’m a big history buff. It hadn’t been that long since the Wall had come down, and I remember seeing pieces of brick on the streets that had been broken from when the Wall came down. It was just eerie.”

The Vikings didn’t waste any time before their next trip overseas. The following year, they traveled 6,000 miles to Tokyo, which remains the farthest they ever have gone for a game.

The Vikings defeated the Chiefs 17-9 at the Tokyo Dome before a sellout crowd of 49,555. The most popular players on the trip for the Vikings were quarterback Warren Moon and wide receiver Cris Carter, both future hall of famers. They signed numerous autographs, and Japanese fans often expressed their gratitude when they got one with a bow.

“When we would go out to eat, the chefs would come out and honor us for eating their food,” McDaniel said. “They came out and bowed and asked if we enjoyed the food.”

McDaniel did. What he didn’t enjoy was trying to adjust to a time zone 14 hours ahead.

“It was brutal,” he said.

The international trips for the Vikings now are not that long, but they are held in the regular season. And that makes a big difference.

“When we went over, it was always preseason, and we stayed longer,” McDaniel said. “There was no rush to come back. But now you fly over and then you play and then you fly back, so I don’t know if I would have liked to have gone over there for a regular-season game. That would truly have thrown my routine off.”

Mindful of not wanting that to happen to players, the Vikings flew to London on Thursday night, arrived Friday morning, and will fly home immediately after the game. Executive director of health and performance Tyler Williams said the Vikings don’t want players to fully acclimate to the six-hour time difference because they then would need to fully acclimate back, a problem since they have a game Oct. 9 against Chicago at U.S. Bank Stadium. They are staying at a hotel an hour north of central London, so there hasn’t figured to be much sightseeing.

The Vikings had bye weeks following each of their two previous regular-season Sunday games in London, so they had longer trips and got some time to see the sights. In 2013, they left on Monday night and arrived Tuesday morning.

“We went and saw the Crown Jewels and stuff,” Vikings safety Harrison Smith said. “It was cool. We saw Parliament, Big Ben and all of that.”

On Sunday, Smith will become the first Vikings player to appear in three games in London. Wide receiver Adam Thielen is the only other Minnesota player remaining from the 2013 trip, but he was then a rookie on the practice squad.

Thielen shined in London in 2017, catching five passes for 98 yards and being named Man of the Match before an enthusiastic sellout crowd of 74,237. After an 18-yard touchdown reception in the second quarter from Case Keenum, he thrilled fans with a soccer slide to celebrate.

On that trip, the Vikings departed for London on Wednesday night and arrived Thursday morning. Thielen said that gave players time to check out some pubs and go to a Premier League soccer game between Arsenal and Swansea City.

Both Smith and Thielen said football fans in England were more knowledge in 2017 than in 2013, and they are expecting to see another jump in knowledge Sunday.

“They are becoming more aware of what American football is,” Thielen said. “You could tell just from the first time to the second time, just the celebrations, the cheering was more on point.”

On Sunday, one of the fans on hand will be Jordan, who said he’ll be rooting for both teams because he “can’t lose in that situation.” Since arriving in London, he already has been talking about how far the NFL has come on an international stage since he played in that 1983 game.

“I tell people I played in the first World Bowl in Europe, and I’m pretty proud of that fact,” he said. “It was great to experience that. The Vikings have been pioneers and now the Vikings are going back to Europe again. It’s exciting, and I’m certainly looking forward to the continued progression of American football in Europe.”

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These are some of the most common and least common COVID symptoms in 2022 – NBC Chicago

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These Are Some Of The Most Common And Least Common Covid Symptoms In 2022 – Nbc Chicago
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With cold and flu season approaching as temperatures drop, and experts are watching for a potential further increase in COVID cases. many might wonder what exactly is behind their symptoms.

Some of the most common symptoms of COVID, especially in 2022 so far, overlap with several conditions, including colds and flu.

Although upper respiratory tract symptoms are currently the most telling sign of the virus, some changes in symptoms have been observed as the virus progresses.

“We see a lot of things happening with the changing virus, you know,” Dr. Isaac Ghinai, medical director for the Chicago Department of Public Health who oversees COVID-19 testing and surveillance, said earlier this month. laboratory monitoring. “Omicron and its sublines are an example of the virus changing quite a bit, and there are indications that different lines of the virus may cause slightly different symptoms.”

Ghinai said differences in symptoms may also be affected by the introduction of vaccines and their subsequent widespread use nearly a year into the pandemic.

“There are indications for example, with omicron, that loss of taste and smell is less common than it was with some of the earlier lines. All of this is also likely impacted by the fact that many more people are vaccinated than before,” Ghinai said.

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, early symptoms of COVID typically include fatigue, headache, sore throat, or fever.

A study by researchers at the University of Southern California found that a fever could be the first, along with a cough and muscle aches. Afterwards, those infected will likely experience nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Unlike other respiratory illnesses such as MERS and SARS, COVID patients will likely develop nausea and vomiting before diarrhea, the researchers found.

Digestive symptoms, in some cases, may be the first sign that a person has contracted COVID. They are known to develop early in an infection, with respiratory symptoms possibly following a day later, according to an Emerson Health article.

Still, some symptoms, such as shortness of breath, have become less frequent as the virus continues to mutate. Dr. Sharon Welbel, director of hospital epidemiology and infection control for Cook County Health, said earlier this month that fever and cough have become more common symptoms in recent months.

“In terms of symptoms and what people have, it’s so heterogeneous,” Welbel said. “I find that with omicron we know the most common are always fever, cough – plus as much shortness of breath.”

As for the flu, the season hasn’t “started in a serious way yet,” according to Chicago’s top doctor. In the meantime, health experts are warning residents of flu and COVID-19 symptoms while encouraging vaccination for both.

According to Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady, the two viruses have multiple strains that are active at the same time, resulting in minor differences in symptoms from case to case.

Because COVID and flu symptoms are often extremely similar, Arwady said there’s only one way to know for sure which virus you may have contracted.

“Typically, people who get the flu tend to have a fever, body aches, feel like they’ve been hit by a truck, and may feel very sick. Of course, people can also contracting those who have COVID is that you have to take a test to be sure,” Arwady said.

But what about some of the less common symptoms?

During a Facebook Live on Tuesday, Arwady answered a question regarding vertigo, a symptom that has been reported in some while recovering from COVID.

Arwady said that while patients may be more susceptible to developing dizziness while recovering from COVID, the symptom is not specific to the virus and has been linked to other infections during recovery.

“We see people after an ear infection, after an influenza infection, a number of things can make people more likely to develop dizziness. And so generally you may be a little more likely to develop dizziness if you recently recovered from COVID,” Arwadi said.

As cases continue to occur, many are curious about other symptoms, such as rashes or headaches.

“We’re seeing a lot more sore throat, fatigue, it still seems like a fever and a runny nose,” Arwady said, pointing out that while headaches and rashes can be symptoms of COVID, no d them is “one of the main .”

As for the symptoms that often persist the longest? A cough.

“It’s going to last the longest, almost forever,” Chicago’s top doctor, Allison Arwady, said at a press conference earlier this month. “Coughing tends to be the most lingering effect. This is true whenever you have a viral infection. You may feel totally better and you will still have some irritation.”

The latest BA.5 variant remains the main driver of COVID cases in the United States, although newer variants are slowly starting to gain momentum. New omicron-specific boosters have recently become readily available, with health officials encouraging widespread inoculation ahead of an expected spike in cases over the fall and winter months.

Regardless of changes in symptoms, Ghinai said getting vaccinated and boosted can significantly improve symptoms of the virus if infected.

“Certainly, the severity of symptoms if you’re vaccinated is much less and the severity of symptoms if you’re boosted is even less, which can kind of change the look,” Ghinai said.

The CDC says the median time to onset of symptoms in a patient with the different omicron lineages could be as little as three days.

In general, symptoms will usually appear 2 to 14 days after exposure to the virus, according to the CDC. However, their duration may depend on the person, the severity of their infection, and whether or not they end up with long COVID.

“Some people say they feel better within a day, others say they still have lingering symptoms after three weeks,” Welbel said.

The most common symptoms of the virus include:

– Fever or chills

-Cough

– Shortness of breath

-Fatigue

– Muscle or body pain

-Headache

-New loss of taste or smell

-Sore throat

– Congestion or runny nose

-Nausea or vomiting

-Diarrhea

Patients are urged to seek emergency medical attention if they experience:

-Respiratory disorder

– Persistent chest pain or pressure

-New confusion

– Inability to wake up or stay awake

– Pale, gray or blue skin, lips or nail beds

NBC Chicago

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Robert Saleh seeks to clarify Quinnen Williams ‘gasping’ comment: ‘Best shape of his life’

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On Thursday afternoon, Jets defensive coordinator Jeff Ulbrich raised some eyebrows when he said he needed to be smart about defensive tackle Quinnen Williams’ snap count because he’s “gasping” for air at times.

Friday morning, Jets coach Robert Saleh said Ulbrich’s quote was taken out of context.

“Quinnen is in the best shape of his life,” Saleh said. “I’m not going to get into the details of what happened yesterday.

“A quote was taken and used against Jeff. We all know where Jeff’s heart is. He spent 15 minutes prior to that question showering Q [Williams] with praise.

“We have our rotations, we do things the way we do them. Quinnen is in phenomenal shape. It is kind of bush league to take a one-liner, but it is what it is.”

During his press conference Thursday, Ulbrich was asked why Williams only received 46 of 78 snaps in his performance in the 27-12 loss against the Bengals where he registered four tackles and a sack. Ulbrich said he needed to be smart about Williams’ snaps as they wanted to use him as much as they could in “critical moments.”

Some people on social media took Ulbrich’s comments to mean that Williams was not in great shape or that he was taking a shot at the fourth-year player.

Saleh said whatever Williams and Ulbrich have said about the situation, the Jets will keep it “in-house.”

The Jets defense has been in the news recently but for all the wrong reasons. Ulbrich’s comments are coming five days after Williams and Jets defensive line coach Aaron Whitecotton argued on the sideline after the team allowed a 56-yard touchdown to Tyler Boyd.

Williams said he wanted the Jets to use their front four to generate pressure on Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow. When Gang Green opted to send blitzes on the play, Williams was visibly upset and said he and his teammates were competitive.

“Two extremely passionate, fiery guys that love this game and love winning and love competing, and when you have guys that are built that way, which I think winning organizations and championship organizations, you need those type of people, coaches and players alike,” Ulbrich said Thursday.

“There are times where that gets heated, and it comes from a good place. It’s something that we don’t want to happen, obviously, but when it does happen, it’s not rooted in selfishness. It’s not rooted in my way, your way, it’s not rooted in anything from a negative perspective. It’s just two guys that love this game and love ball and want the best for this organization, want the best for this team, the best for their teammates and sometimes it boils over a little bit.”

It also doesn’t help that the Jets defense is ranked 31st on third down percentage as opposing teams are converting 51.3%of the time. To help correct that, the Jets tried to address that ahead of this weekend’s game against the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Although the Steelers offense is ranked 31st in the NFL [272.7 yards per game], they have several talented skill position players in running back Najee Harris and wide receiver George Pickens and Diontae Johnson.

“We added another third down period over the course of the week,” Saleh said. “We are trying to make sure we are precise on where we are at offensively and defensively.

“It comes down to execution and it comes down to calling plays in the right position, coaches and players alike. I got faith that it will come around as some of the mistakes that are happening are very fixable. I’m looking forward to trying to get it right.”

ZACH GETS GREEN LIGHT

Saleh announced that quarterback Zach Wilson would officially start in Sunday’s game against the Steelers. On Wednesday, Saleh said Wilson would start if “all goes well this week.”

The news isn’t so great for linebacker Quincy Williams. He is the only Jets player listed as out this week after an ankle injury he sustained last week against the Bengals. Cornerback Brandin Echols (hamstring) and John Franklin-Myers (toe) are both expected to play.

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