Connect with us

News

CDC announces sweeping reorganization, aimed at changing agency culture and restoring public trust

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Cdc Announces Sweeping Reorganization, Aimed At Changing Agency Culture And Restoring Public Trust
google news



CNN

Big changes are coming to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which recently celebrated its 75th anniversary as the nation’s leading public health agency.

CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky met with the agency’s senior leadership this morning to outline her plans to overhaul the way the agency works. She plans to remake the culture to help the agency act faster when responding to a public health crisis. She also wants to make it easier for other parts of government to work with the CDC and wants to simplify and streamline the website to eliminate overlapping and conflicting public health guidance.

Staff will be notified of the change by email. More than 12,000 people work at the agency, which is headquartered in Atlanta.

The changes will aim to improve the culture and restore public confidence after the agency’s acknowledged missteps in its response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The reforms follow a period of review and soul-searching at the CDC. In April, Walensky announced that Jim Macrae, associate administrator for primary health care at the Health Resources and Services Administration, would lead a month-long review of the agency’s Covid-19 response efforts. At the same time, she assigned three of her deputies to scrutinize operations and recommend strategic changes. Walensky met with groups of employees in person as employees return to their desks after months of working remotely.

The course correction comes after significant stumbles at the agency in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The United States had little capacity to test for the infection in the early months of the pandemic, largely because the agency released a flawed test for public health labs. This kept the nation blind, for months, to the extent of the spread of the virus.

The agency has also been criticized throughout the pandemic for issuing public health advice that some viewed as confusing and ineffective. Many also felt that he was not moving fast enough to react.

Walensky will bring former HHS assistant secretary Mary Wakefield to the CDC to oversee the reorganization.

Key organizational changes announced today include:

• The Division of Laboratory Sciences and Office of Science will now report directly to the CDC Director, a move to improve accountability for providing timely information

• A new Office of Intergovernmental Affairs – a hub where state health departments and other federal agencies interact with the CDC

• A new executive board, reporting to the director, will determine agency priorities, monitor progress and align budget decisions, with a focus on public health impact

• A new Office of Equity, which will both increase diversity in the CDC’s workforce and add this lens to its public health activities

Additional actions announced today include:

• CDC to create new online mechanism for advance science dissemination

• The agency will streamline and simplify its guidance documents and website’

Walensky also plans to ask Congress to grant the agency new powers, including requiring jurisdictions to share their data. Currently, the CDC depends on states and counties to do this voluntarily.

It will also ask for new flexibilities in the financing of the agency. Right now, when Congress appropriates money for the CDC, it must be spent on specific programs. This created over 150 individual budget lines that fund the agency. This can be a problem when a public health emergency occurs. In 2014, when the Ebola outbreak began, Dr. Tom Frieden, then CDC director, had to borrow money from other parts of the federal government to respond.

“We literally had no money for airfare and per diems to send personnel into the field,” said Frieden, who was interviewed by Macrae for the review.

“I had, literally, 20 times more flex dollars as New York City health commissioner than as CDC director,” Frieden said in an interview with CNN. Frieden now heads the nonprofit Resolve to Save Lives.

Some of these changes have already begun, including a reorganization of the agency’s communications operations.

Earlier this year, the CDC filled a long-vacant position when it hired Kevin Griffis, a public affairs veteran with the Department of Health and Human Services and Planned Parenthood, to lead its communications efforts. In addition to communicating CDC health information, part of his job is to manage “risk communication and reputational issues for the agency,” according to the CDC’s website. The agency has not had a communications officer for four years, according to a senior official with knowledge of the changes who was not authorized to speak to reporters.

A final version of Macrae’s review will be released today. Key recommendations include:

• Share discoveries and scientific data faster

• Better translate science into practical and easy-to-understand policies

• Prioritize public health communications

• Reduce the importance of the publication of scientific discoveries for career advancement

• New training for agency staff so multiple people can fulfill the same role in public health emergencies

Cnn

google news
Advertisement

News

John Shipley: Don’t discount another Vikings win over Detroit. This was a big one

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

John Shipley: Let’s Hope We’re Not Left With Stupid Baseball
google news

Well, we don’t have the Vikings to kick around this week. But, boy, was it close. That’s the NFL. Even the best teams are going to have to steal a few wins here and there.

A team like this one, three games into a new season with a new coaching staff? We’re going to watch more nail-biters like the Vikings’ 28-24, come-from-behind victory over the Detroit Lions on Sunday at U.S. Bank Stadium.

“It was a good learning game,” veteran linebacker Eric Kendricks said. “We got hit in the mouth a lot. We weren’t perfect, but we’re going to be better going forward.”

As noted, it looked bleak, especially after Detroit drove into Vikings territory with a 24-21 lead and the clock winding down under 4 minutes to play. The Lions needed to convert a fourth-and-1 from the Minnesota 30 to, for all intents and purposes, close the game out. Detroit already was 4 for 5 on fourth-down conversions and fans were getting not just anxious but testy, a shouting match breaking out in the stands just beneath the press box.

The Vikings just kept playing.

“That’s what our job is,” defensive end Danielle Hunter said. “Things ain’t always gonna go our way. Adversity’s always going to strike; it’s all about how you respond. So, you’ve got to keep chopping wood.”

On fourth down, Lions halfback Jamaal Williams ran off tackle right and immediately ran into trouble in the form of Hunter and Kendricks.

“Oh, we knew they were gonna run it, man,” Hunter said. “Fourth-and-1, it has run written all over it. Everyone just had to be in their gaps.”

They were. Williams was stood up for no gain, and the Vikings had life again. Yet, still it looked bleak when on the Vikings’ ensuing drive, quarterback Kirk Cousins and receiver Adam Thielen couldn’t connect on fourth-and-8 with 2 minutes, 32 seconds left, giving Detroit the ball back at the Vikings’ 47-yard line.

Game over, right? Here we go again.

“I didn’t even really think about it, to be honest,” said Thielen, who had a good case for interference on the play. Instead of stewing, he looked ahead.

“Throughout a game, you can do two things when you get back to the sideline: You can look back at plays you could have done a better job on, and get frustrated, or you can move on and try to be prepared for the next series,” he said.

Good call, because when Detroit place-kicker Austin Seibert missed a 54-yard field-goal attempt, the Vikings had one last chance from their own 44 with 1:10 left. It took them exactly 20 seconds to score the go-ahead touchdown on a 28-yard pass from Cousins to K.J. Osborn.

Thielen was open on the play, but Osborn was too — and closer to the end zone. He trotted in untouched and the Vikings had their first lead of the game, 28-24, after Greg Joseph’s extra-point kick.

The two completed passes — both to Osborn, both for 28 yards — were, head coach Kevin O’Connell acknowledged, “quite honestly … not on the call sheet. But we found a way to go out there with all 11 (players) and execute.”

“You could kind of feel in the huddle, with that momentum shift, ‘Hey, we’re going to do something here,’ ” Thielen said. “ ‘I don’t know how it’s going to shake out, but we’re going to do something here.’ ”

It wasn’t always pretty, but it was a good win. An important win, particularly for a team still finding its legs. There’s a big difference between 2-1 and 1-2, and it’s a lot better to learn from mistakes made during a win than a loss. And lest we forget, the Vikings lost a game just like this last season at Ford Field.

No, we don’t have the Vikings to kick around this week. A win, against any team by any means, was required to rinse the taste of last Monday’s 24-7 loss at Philadelphia’s from everyone’s mouth.

It wasn’t pretty, but it’ll do.

“There’s a lot of things we’ll do better,” O’Connell said.

After a win like that one, even against the eternally struggling Lions, it’s much, much easier to believe him.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Orioles collapse late for second straight day, fall to Astros, 6-3, in 11 innings to settle for series split

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Orioles Collapse Late For Second Straight Day, Fall To Astros, 6-3, In 11 Innings To Settle For Series Split
google news

Rougned Odor came up clutch twice Sunday, producing when the Orioles most needed him. But when a laser left his bat in the eighth inning, he didn’t think the ball would drop until it was over the right field wall.

And by the time Odor noticed that ball was destined to bang off the top of the scoreboard, the tying run had crossed but the second baseman stood on first rather than second. The baserunning gaffe proved costly in Sunday’s 6-3 loss to the Houston Astros, which ended the four-game series against the American League’s best club in a split.

But the implications of Odor, who had a pair of game-tying hits, admiring his near-home run instead of running out of the box is what might’ve led to the extra-innings collapse, with Houston scoring four runs off left-hander Keegan Akin and right-hander Joey Krehbiel in the 11th inning to create the necessary separation.

In the eighth, when Ryan Mountcastle lashed a double into right-center field, Odor drove him in with that hard-hit ball off the right field wall. The game was tied at 1, and Odor let out a fist pump and a yell toward his dugout. But he might’ve scored on Kyle Stowers’ single in the next at-bat, and he would’ve likely scored on Jorge Mateo’s infield single one at-bat later had he reached second on his game-tying hit.

Instead, the inning ended with bases loaded, Odor on third and the game still tied. And it remained that way into extra innings before an eventual collapse — four of the first five Astros reached safely in the 11th, with the one out a sacrifice fly to score the first of the four runs.

Baltimore had enough to overcome two deficits — first in the eighth and again in the 10th. With Trey Mancini at the plate for Houston, a wild pitch from right-hander Dillon Tate brought home Yuli Gurriel from third. Mancini later doubled off the top of the left field wall; by staying in the yard, Odor drove in the Orioles’ second run of the game, serving as the late-game stoic for a second time to level the score.

But a third comeback was out of reach, even as Cedric Mullins got one run back with an RBI single in the 11th.

Hours earlier, a 46-minute rain delay came at the right time for Baltimore, knocking Astros right-hander Cristian Javier out of the contest after he faced the minimum through six innings and didn’t allow a hit until the fifth.

Javier struck out seven of the first 12 batters he faced, then finished with eight strikeouts overall. And by holding the Orioles scoreless, he extended his scoreless innings streak to 20.

But even with so little offensive production, right-hander Austin Voth kept the Orioles in the game. He gave up his lone run on a third-inning sacrifice fly, securing his ninth straight appearance with two runs or fewer scored against him.

The Astros broke through against the bullpen for the second straight game, though, capitalizing on a disastrous inning from Akin and Krehbiel. With just 10 games to play, the Orioles find themselves 4 games behind the Mariners, who blew a nine-run sixth inning lead and lost to the Royals, 13-12.

A comeback fell short Sunday. And a comeback for the final wild-card race might’ve fallen short Sunday, too.

Around the horn

  • Tyler Wells, who will miss the remainder of the season on the 15-day injured list for right shoulder inflammation, said the injury reminds him of the pain he felt at the end of last year. The shoulder wasn’t aggravated in any way by his earlier oblique strain, however. Still, watching from the dugout the remainder of the season is a disappointing development. “I use the term ‘heartbroken’ because it sucks whenever you’re not able to compete with the team as we’re making the final push,” Wells said. “It’s really difficult to sit there and be on the sidelines, but I’m trying to contribute as much as I can by being supportive.”
  • Right-hander Félix Bautista threw a career-high 33 pitches in Saturday’s loss, but his lack of usage last week makes manager Brandon Hyde confident there will be no arm fatigue for Bautista. “He’s thrown a lot this year, but we’ll just check in with him every day and see what he’s doing,” Hyde said.
  • Infielder Ramón Urías left Saturday’s game with a spasm between his neck and right shoulder, something he’s dealt with over the past few days. Hyde figured Urías will be back in the lineup in a day or two.

This story will be updated.

[email protected] SOX

Monday, 7:10p.m.

TV: MASN2

Radio: 97.9 FM, 101.5 FM, 1090 AM

()

google news
Continue Reading

News

Chicago Cubs starters have the majors’ 3rd-best ERA since the All-Star break. How improved depth better positions them for 2023.

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Chicago Cubs Starters Have The Majors’ 3Rd-Best Era Since The All-Star Break. How Improved Depth Better Positions Them For 2023.
google news

The Pittsburgh Pirates’ approach to Adrian Sampson was simple — and allowed the Chicago Cubs right-hander to be effective.

Aggressive, early swings in the count allowed Sampson to cruise through six innings Sunday, shutting down the Pirates in an 8-3 victory at PNC Park. Sampson allowed one run and four hits on 67 pitches, striking out six with no walks.

Sampson exemplifies the improved depth and internal options the Cubs have been able to utilize this season. He showed a glimpse last year in 10 appearances (five starts), recording a 2.80 ERA in 35⅓ innings. He has remained reliable in a larger role in 2022, posting a 3.23 ERA in 94⅔ innings through 19 appearances (17 starts).

Sampson is one of 14 pitchers to start multiple games for the Cubs in 2022. More important is the quality of the pitchers the Cubs have used to fill in for injuries in the rotation.

Fewer veteran, journeyman pitchers and more internal arms — such as Javier Assad, Caleb Kilian and Hayden Wesneski — to fill in over the last few weeks better positions the Cubs to build their pitching staff in 2023.

Since the All-Star break, the rotation’s 3.15 ERA ranks third in the majors behind the Los Angeles Dodgers and Houston Astros.

“Early in the year when we had the depth but they maybe just weren’t ready, it showed how much it affected our team,” pitching coach Tommy Hottovy said Sunday. “We went through some tough stretches where we didn’t have the ability to have consistent starting pitching.

“And now that you have guys that have proven that they can do that, that have had a good run through the minor leagues and they come up and have success, it definitely gives you a lot of confidence as an organization that going into next year you’ve got some viable starting pitching depth, long reliever depth that you know can come up and help through the course of a long season.”

With nine games left, the Cubs won’t rush back any starter who is working through something.

Left-hander Drew Smyly (left shoulder fatigue) initially was looking to pitch when the team returns home to face the Philadelphia Phillies on Tuesday through Thursday, but he is not slated to start during the series. He threw a bullpen session Sunday, and if it goes well, Smyly could make one more start this season.

Left-hander Wade Miley (left oblique tightness) felt better Sunday, but given the injuries he has battled this year, it would not be a surprise if he’s done for the season.

Left-hander Justin Steele likely will throw another high-intensity bullpen before the Cubs evaluate whether the next step is live batting practice or being activated off the injured list. Ideally Steele would pitch in another big-league game, but ensuring he is fully healthy is the main priority.

“The value of getting in the game would just be checking a box basically,” Hottovy said. “Make sure that he’s progressing and feeling the way the way he wants. We can also do that in a bullpen setting or live BP setting as well. So we’ll just evaluate how the next few days go and then make the decision as a group (on) what’s best for Justin at that time.”

As attention starts to shift to the offseason, the Cubs lack a true No. 1 starter. That should be a top priority in the offseason. The Cubs have a good mix to build around a top starter, led by Marcus Stroman, Steele and Keegan Thompson. Wesneski has shown promise, too, while Adbert Alzolay likely will prepare for a starter’s workload in the offseason and report to camp built up.

“When we start getting into the free-agent information, the digging, the talking through what we want to do, obviously all the things that we’ve done with these guys is going to play a factor into what we try to do,” Hottovy said. “And hopefully (free agents) will see that we’re heading in the direction that we want to go and that they would want to go.”

Alzolay’s best fit could be as a multi-inning reliever, which is enticing to Hottovy and the Cubs. It also plays into building a balanced bullpen by incorporating a mix of controllable, younger arms with veteran relievers.

The Cubs have relied on veteran free agents to fill the back-end, high-leverage spots the last two seasons and then flipped those relievers at the trade deadline. Ultimately they want a blend of experience in the bullpen and a diversified pitch mix to ensure they can give different looks and not become one-dimensional.

A multi-inning reliever for higher-leverage spots would be ideal.

“That’s something I definitely see Adbert being able to fulfill,” Hottovy said. “Once we get to a point where he’s feeling good and fully healthy and gets through this season feeling good.”

The wild card for the 2023 pitching staff is veteran right-hander Kyle Hendricks.

Hottovy said the Cubs can count on Hendricks next season “until he proves (to) us otherwise.” Hendricks, who will be entering his final guaranteed year, has been rehabbing his right shoulder strain at the Cubs complex in Mesa, Ariz., since mid-August. He still is not throwing.

Hendricks’ work right now is focused on strengthening his lower body as he refines his delivery. Hottovy hopes that by the time Hendricks starts throwing, he will be mechanically locked in with his lower half.

“He’s been relatively healthy for a lot of his career, so I’m confident in him getting some rest (and) having a good normal offseason and buildup,” Hottovy said. “So as of right now, we absolutely are believing in Kyle Hendricks to be a huge part of what we’re going to do next year, and obviously we’ll have to see how things develop over the offseason. We’ll be in constant communication with him.”

()

google news
Continue Reading

News

Frankie Montas’ postseason status still in question with 10 days left in regular season

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Frankie Montas’ Postseason Status Still In Question With 10 Days Left In Regular Season
google news

The Yankees traded away a significant portion of their pitching depth to Oakland to get Frankie Montas last month. The right-hander was expected to be their No. 2 starter in the postseason, but now he is unlikely to be available for at least the first round of the playoffs, manager Aaron Boone admitted.

“Well, I mean, it’s probably getting to a point where it’s going to be tough, as like a starting, built-up option,” Boone said before Sunday night’s game against the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium. “Especially if [it’s] a few more days and we’re at 14 days [without throwing] and then you start building that back. So that might be a challenge, but I do think there’s a chance that he can have a role and impact us. It’s just a matter of how the next couple of weeks go.”

Montas said Sunday the shoulder inflammation that put him on the injured list on Sept. 20 is feeling better, but there is no scheduled date for him to start throwing again. There are 10 days left in the regular season.

Since coming to the Yankees, Montas has been less than impressive. So far, he has a 6.35 ERA in eight starts with the Bombers.

The Yankees dealt minor league pitching prospects Luis Medina and Ken Waldichuk along with J.P. Sears, who had already contributed to the big league club, for Montas and reliever Lou Trivino (who coincidentally is the only one of the Yankees’ deadline acquisitions who has not been injured). The idea was that Montas had success against the Rays, who have given the Yankees problems in the regular season and the playoffs and the Astros, who have beaten the Bombers in the American League Championship Series two times in the last six years. Montas has a 2.23 ERA against the Rays in eight career starts and a 3.40 against the Astros in 15 starts.

LEMAHIEU LIMPING TO THE END

DJ LeMahieu thinks he may be able to come off the injured list at the end of the upcoming three-game series against the Blue Jays in Toronto. The infielder has been out with right big/second toe inflammation, an issue that has been plaguing him since the first half of the season.

But first, LeMahieu and the Yankees have to believe he can get good swings off — and then he has to prove he can do it in games to be a viable option for the playoffs.

“I mean, it’s got to a point where he feels like this is something that we need to try and worthwhile to find out,” Boone said. “And then and then we’ll kind of make those evaluations as he gets out there.”

LeMahieu had a cortisone shot in July and it helped for a few weeks. He and the team tried orthotics in his cleats and they are discussing shots that could help him manage the pain to play through it.

BOUNCE BACK BRITTON

Zack Britton bounced back after pitching in a big league game for the first time in over a year. The lefty reliever had a tough 2022 debut, but the Yankees were only worried about how his surgically reconstructed left elbow felt after the outing Saturday.

“The elbow feels really good,” Boone said. “You know, he had sore legs and stuff like that. But that was a good test for him getting out in that environment, throw your 19 pitches and his stuff took an uptick from what he’s been doing the last month. So to feel good from an elbow standpoint, I think today was good. It was good to see and we’ll just continue to see how he continues to bounce back.”

Britton walked Rafael Devers, gave up a single to Xander Bogaerts and struck out Alex Verdugo. He then walked Kike Hernandez and Triston Casas to bring in a run.

Britton, whose sinker velocity ticked up to 94.7 miles per hour Saturday, has extensive closing experience. The veteran has 154 career saves and had a 1.89 ERA in 2020, his last full season. He is in the final year of a $53 million, four-year contract with the Yankees.

Right now, the Yankees are closing by committee.

()

google news
Continue Reading

News

Nestor Cortes Jr. looks to continue being the Yankees’ most reliable pitcher against Red Sox on Sunday

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Nestor Cortes Jr. Looks To Continue Being The Yankees’ Most Reliable Pitcher Against Red Sox On Sunday
google news

Nestor Cortes Jr. goes into Sunday night’s game against the Red Sox with an excellent resume and a playoff rotation spot locked up. All things being equal, Cortes Jr. would likely be considered to start the all important Game 1 of the postseason. But, of course, Cortes Jr. is a 36th-rounder who has overcome the odds and Aaron Boone is doubling down on the Bombers’ ace, Gerrit Cole.

Asked if he still “trusted” Cole in the playoffs following another outing ruined by a pair of home runs, Boone said, “Yeah, what’s the alternative?”

Well, Cortes Jr. or Luis Severino at this point.

Cole was signed to a historic nine-year, $324 million contract before the 2020 season to be the piece that gets the Yankees over the humo in the playoffs. At the time, Yankees managing partner Hal Steinbrenner made it clear he expected that deal to win the Yankees multiple World Series championships.

Cole’s performances in the playoffs have been mixed — he pitched well in the COVID postseason of 2020. Most remember his meltdown last October against the Red Sox in the American League Wild Card game, where he could not record an out in the third inning.

So far this season, Cole has racked up some pretty impressive individual statistics. He’s struck out 244 hitters, which is most in the majors, over 188.1 innings pitched. And has pitched to a respectable 3.49 ERA in 31 starts.

But Cole has looked unreliable as of late. He’s the only pitcher in the big leagues this season that has allowed four earned runs and at least two home runs in three consecutive starts. They happen to be his last three starts.

But Boone doesn’t see that as an issue.

“I thought he threw the ball awesome [Friday] night,” Boone said of Cole’s latest start that ended in an emotional meltdown. 

After not getting the 1-2 strike call that he wanted — and the one that the Yankees have been screaming that should not be called on Aaron Judge all year — Cole threw what two scouts confirmed was an “emotional fastball.” He was angry and tried to overwhelm Alex Verdugo with a 100-mile an hour fastball, which Cole admitted was a bad pitch and it landed in the seats. That cost the Yankees the 4-1 lead Cole had just been handed.

It was the 10th home run Cole has allowed in his last six starts.

“It is remarkable,” Boone said. “A pretty dominant outing and one pitch at the end wrecks the line. We’re doing all we can to avoid those certain things.

“It’s crazy that has happened. The bottom line is we’ve got a guy throwing the ball incredibly well right now, with every capability to go out there and dominate.”

While Cole’s home run per nine is pretty similar to his career rate, those home runs he is giving up this year aren’t just one-run homers in lopsided games.

Of Cole’s career-high tying 31 homers allowed, 14 of them broke a tie game, three tied a game and two lost the lead for the Yankees. He has the second highest hard hit % of his career (39.6%) and second highest fly ball rate of his career (29.2%).

“If he executes at a high level, he can shut down anyone,” Boone said. “He’s in that place to do that. We’ve got to get [over] that hump. The only thing to change that narrative is to go out and avoid that one big one. That’s all it’s been, one big one here and there.”

Cortes Jr.’s numbers aren’t as sexy as Cole’s. The lefty goes into Sunday night’s finale against the Red Sox with a 10-4 record and a 2.67 ERA over 26 starts. He’s struck out just 146 batters in 145 innings pitched.

But the first-time All-Star doesn’t let sluggers beat him.

Cortes Jr. has allowed just 16 home runs this season, just two have cost the Yankees a lead and eight have broken a tie game. He is in the top-25 percentile in hard hit %, xSlg% and barrel %, which makes the case he has controlled the damage against him.

Cortes Jr. has made the argument that he is the Yankees’ most reliable pitcher this season.

()

google news
Continue Reading

News

Rookies Caleb Hamilton, Ronny Henriquez bright spots in Twins’ blowout loss

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Rookies Caleb Hamilton, Ronny Henriquez Bright Spots In Twins’ Blowout Loss
google news

For the past month, Caleb Hamilton has primarily watched from the bench, occasionally entering games late to catch or even pinch run. Hamilton was briefly with the Twins in July. He joined them again on Aug. 23 and has been on the major-league roster since, searching for his first career hit for a month.

He got it on Sunday.

Hamilton’s first hit — a solo home run to left-center — came near the end of a 10-3 loss to the Los Angeles Angels on Sunday afternoon at Target Field, a bright spot in a game with otherwise little excitement for the Twins.

While the 27-year-old rookie has been with the Twins for more than a month, at-bats have been few and far between, with Gary Sánchez and Sandy León primarily handling catching duties. His first career hit came in his 13th at-bat.

Hamilton’s home run was one of the lone highlights for the Twins, who dropped their 17th game in the month of September. Another? The long relief appearance from rookie Ronny Henriquez.

After starter Dylan Bundy gave up five runs — four earned — against his former teammates in just 3 1/3 innings pitched, Henriquez came in and held the Angels quiet for the entirety of his outing. Henriquez did not give up a run in his 4 2/3 innings pitched, helping keep the game somewhat close.

While the Twins never led in the game, the Angels truly pulled away in the ninth, scoring five runs off reliever Trevor Megill, who retired just one batter in his outing. Angels star Mike Trout had three hits, two of them doubles, and scored three runs in the win, while Shohei Ohtani finished with a pair of hits, scoring a pair of runs.

Twins hitters, meanwhile, had ample opportunity, finishing the game with 11 hits, but they weren’t able to convert on most of their chances, striking out 14 times and leaving 10 runners on base.

google news
Continue Reading

Trending