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Tata Steel, Jsw Steel and Jspl may take a break as export duties may not support prices

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Tata Steel, Jsw Steel And Jspl May Take A Break As Export Duties May Not Support Prices
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Steel Stock Price: Tata Steel, JSW Steel and JSPL may be heading for some consolidation after showing investors double-digit returns over the past few weeks. Experts believe that any rally in steel stocks is an opportunity for profit.

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To buy to sell Tata Steel to share

Major steel stocks – such as Tata Steel, JSW Steel and Jindal Steel & Power – were mixed on Wednesday after a broad rally in recent weeks. Analysts remain cautious on the steel space as they fear an expected reduction in export duties will not be enough to support prices, and suggest using any rally to exit equities.

Tata Steel, JSW Steel and SAIL – India’s largest steelmakers by sales – have rewarded investors with returns of around 17-28% over the past month, outperforming the benchmark Nifty50 index.

Tata Steel, Jsw Steel And Jspl May Take A Break As Export Duties May Not Support Prices

It comes at a time when global steel prices have retreated after hitting a record high in April after a broad rally that lasted two straight years. Disruptions in supply due to the Ukrainian crisis boosted export performance by domestic steelmakers.

CLSA remains cautious on the sector. Expectations of reduced export duties and easing rates for coking coal — a critical input in the steel-making process — have swelled steel inventories, according to the brokerage.

Major steelmakers have urged the government to reduce or remove export duties on steel products amid falling prices and rising domestic supply.

The Center had collected in May a 15 percent duty on the main iron and steel products improve the availability of the alloy on the domestic market, while eliminating import duties on the main raw materials of the sector.

Levying heavy export duty on major steel products is a blow to domestic steel companies in the form of lower EBITDA per ton in the domestic market in the short and medium term, according to ICICI Direct. term.

A key profitability indicator for steelmakers, EBITDA per ton determines how much a company earns on each ton of finished steel products.

A change in the fee structure is unlikely to translate into higher prices, said CLSA, which sees China’s strong stimulus as a key risk for the sector. The brokerage maintained an “underperforming” rating on Tata Steel. It has a “sell” on JSW Steel and an “outperform” on JSPL.

Tata Steel, Jsw Steel And Jspl May Take A Break As Export Duties May Not Support Prices

Steel stocks are on the rise for some consolidation, which should give traders room to exit, said AK Prabhakar, head of research at IDBI Capital Markets. CNBCTV18.com.

“Steel is not going to move up fast with signs of a global slowdown…Any rally in steel stocks should be used to get out. If I was a trader, I would profit from the steel space now,” he said. -he declares. .

Analysts believe the July-September period is a seasonally weak quarter for the industry, marked by weaker demand.

Crisil expects steel to fall to 60,000 rupees per tonne by March 2023 due to weak seasonality with the onset of the monsoon, after peaking at 76,000 rupees per tonne in April.

China’s central bank sent jitters across global financial markets this week with a key interest rate cut after data showed a slowdown in economic activity in the country.

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With the Chicago Bears passing game malfunctioning, Roquan Smith and the defense take things into their own hands

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With The Chicago Bears Passing Game Malfunctioning, Roquan Smith And The Defense Take Things Into Their Own Hands
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An argument can be made that the most impressive throw by a Chicago Bears player Sunday came with 1 minute, 5 seconds remaining, a 40-yard bomb launched near Soldier Field’s south end zone.

The throw came from a linebacker — why not? — during a stoppage of play immediately after the game’s biggest moment.

With his adrenaline pumping after a clutch interception, Roquan Smith wound up and heaved the football deep into the seats, aware that his Bears were moments away from defeating the Houston Texans 23-20 on a walk-off, chip-shot field goal.

“I tried to stop him,” safety Eddie Jackson said. “That’s a game-winning pick. You’ve got to keep that!”

Smith, though, didn’t need the football as much as he needed an emotional release. So he let it fly.

“To all my supporters,” he said with a big smile. “I threw that to all of them. And (I was) saying ‘F you’ to all that don’t.”

Yes, Chicago, your majorly flawed but still feisty Bears are 2-1, outlasting the winless Texans in such a Bears-like way, with Smith and the defense nudging the struggling offense to the side and offering a “We’ve got this” reprieve in the fourth quarter.

The Bears’ game-winning “drive”: four plays, zero yards.

It was basically a three-snap sideways shuffle to set up Cairo Santos’ game-winning 30-yard kick as time expired. That came thanks to Smith’s interception of Davis Mills and an 18-yard return.

And Smith’s third-down pick came in part because defensive tackle Angelo Blackson did his job up front, getting his right hand on Mills’ pass to Rex Burkhead and allowing Smith to snatch the fluttering ball at the Texans 30.

“If you can’t get to the quarterback, get your hands up,” Blackson said. “It was an opportune time. Just perfect, man.”

Added Smith: If I had had a little more juice in me, I could have cribbed it. But I was just thankful to be able to get it and then let the fans enjoy the ball.”

We could talk until we’re blue in the face about how little meaning Sunday’s victory carries for the Bears’ big-picture aspirations. This was an ordinary home win over a bottom-tier opponent and loaded with troubling sloppiness, particularly as it relates to the feeble passing attack and ongoing struggles of second-year quarterback Justin Fields.

Fields threw two more interceptions and, for the third consecutive game, failed to reach 10 completions or 125 passing yards.

“I played like trash,” Fields said. “I played terrible.”

But on defense the Bears are convinced they are making valuable strides and establishing an identity as a unit capable of seizing big moments and winning games.

Smith’s pick was the Bears’ second takeaway, the other coming in the first half when Jackson snagged a Mills pass to Brandin Cooks in the end zone. That throw was deflected by cornerback Kindle Vildor and corralled by Jackson near the end line.

“It’s just flying around,” Jackson said. “That’s what happens. When you hustle and play with intensity, good things start to happen.”

Just as Smith’s interception set up the Bears for free points, Jackson’s thwarted a prime Texans scoring opportunity on a drive that started inside Bears territory after Fields’ first interception.

Equally significant, after Fields threw his second pick on the first play of the fourth quarter to set up the Texans inside the Bears 40 in a tie game, the defense quickly extinguished that threat.

Defensive tackle Justin Jones came up with an 8-yard sack of Mills on second down. Linebacker Nick Morrow followed by burying Pharaoh Brown for a loss of 5 on a tight end screen on the next snap.

The Texans punted.

“That was a huge moment,” Smith said. “We preach about that, about being able to bow our necks and earn our checks.”

Added Jones: “We’re jelling together right now, becoming one close-knit unit. We’re well on our way to playing in midseason form.”

Smith’s play was nothing short of energizing. After missing practice the entire week with a hip injury, he recorded a game-high 16 tackles, including two for a loss.

“I was focused all week on giving myself a shot to play in this game,” he said. “I still wasn’t all the way there. But, hey, halfway (there) is better than no way.”

Hard to argue.

After Smith’s play in a 27-10 Week 2 loss to the Green Bay Packers was justifiably scrutinized — even he acknowledged it was subpar — the veteran linebacker arose Sunday and spearheaded a strong defensive effort.

Late in the third quarter, on third-and-1 from the Bears 2, Smith shot into the Texans backfield to bury running back Dameon Pierce for a 3-yard loss. That was a pivotal stop. The Texans settled for a tying field goal instead of surging ahead.

Naturally, as Smith works toward earning his next contract and regroups after his tension-filled training camp “hold-in,” all of his contributions this season will be assessed in part with an eye on how they might affect his future and his bid to be paid as one of the league’s best defenders.

Sunday’s game-winning interception was the kind of game-changing contribution many want to see more consistently as Smith tries to establish himself as an elite linebacker.

“I just try to play the best ball that I can play,” Smith said. “That’s my goal each and every week. And if I make big plays, I make them. But I’m not going out there wishing for things. I play my game and if good things happen, they happen.”

More importantly, as the Bears continue working through a patience-testing troubleshooting process to awaken their passing offense, they are finding other ways to succeed and leaning on areas of strength. On Sunday, that meant a reliance on a bruising running attack led by Khalil Herbert, who stepped up in a big way after David Montgomery left the game with a right knee/ankle injury.

Herbert turned 20 carries into 157 yards and two touchdowns. Overall, the Bears churned out 281 rushing yards, their highest single-game total since 1984.

Then late in the game, the Bears again turned to their defense, relying on the unit’s best player to come through in a major way. Smith responded with that pick and his celebratory bomb into the seats.

“That was pretty sweet,” he said. “I wish I could have thrown it out of the stadium.”

It was an impressive toss nonetheless — and a fitting punctuation on the afternoon.

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Khalil Herbert — with David Montgomery injured and Justin Fields playing like self-proclaimed ‘trash’ — steps up big for Chicago Bears

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Khalil Herbert — With David Montgomery Injured And Justin Fields Playing Like Self-Proclaimed ‘Trash’ — Steps Up Big For Chicago Bears
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Khalil Herbert stood at his Soldier Field locker about a half an hour after the Chicago Bears squeaked out a 23-20 win over the Houston Texans and gave a one-word answer for how he felt.

“Sore,” he said with a smile.

But sore in the best way.

The second-year Bears running back rushed for a career-high 157 yards and two touchdowns on 20 carries as the Bears piled up 281 yards on the ground. It was the Bears’ best rushing performance since 1984, according to the team, and a much-needed lift for an offense as the passing game continues to struggle under quarterback Justin Fields.

Herbert spent the first two games of the season as the second option to running back David Montgomery and totaled 13 carries for 83 yards. But on the Bears’ second drive, Montgomery’s right leg was caught awkwardly under a Texans defender, and he was out the remainder of the game with what the Bears announced as knee and ankle injuries.

Herbert didn’t miss a beat.

On the next play, Herbert rushed for eight yards. Two plays later, he broke for 11 yards. And one play after that, he scored on an 11-yard touchdown run, breaking to the left sideline before popping back in through a hole to speed to the end zone for a 10-0 Bears lead in the first quarter.

“What he did is special,” Bears right guard Lucas Patrick said. “Any back to run for that is special, but then to step up when one of our offensive leaders goes down, and to do that and say, ‘Don’t worry, I got us,’ it invigorates all of us. It inspires all of us to keep going, keep pushing. Even at the end, for him to get that huge run at the end, it’s like, ‘We’re going to get this.’”

Bears coach Matt Eberflus said the news is positive on Montgomery, whom he said is “day to day.” Herbert and Fields both said they talked to or texted with Montgomery, and the running back was doing well.

Herbert, who was a 2021 sixth-round pick out of Virginia Tech, filled in for Montgomery over a four-game stretch last year and had 78 carries for 344 yards. So he has experience stepping up when needed.

“It’s really just making the most of my opportunities,” Herbert said. “I come in with that mindset every week, whether it’s one carry, 20 carries. Just try to make the most of that and make a play with what I get.”

On Sunday, Herbert’s performance included a 52-yard run to open the Bears’ first drive of the third quarter. Herbert credited the offensive line and fullback Khari Blasingame for opening a massive hole he darted through before fighting off cornerback Derek Stingley Jr. to get to the Texans’ 23-yard line.

“We were looking at the pictures on the sidelines — we could have drove a bus through there,” Herbert said. “It was a really big hole. It was my job to make the safety miss and I was able to do that.”

Four plays later, the Bears went ahead 20-17 on Herbert’s one-yard touchdown run, and the Bears went on to win on Cairo Santos’ 30-yard field goal as time expired.

Fields said Herbert’s performance wasn’t a surprise to his teammates, who know the work he puts in and the type of player he can be.

Fields contributed to the Bears’ big day on the ground with eight carries for 47 yards. Equanimeous St. Brown had two carries for 43 yards and rookie Trestan Ebner added seven carries for 23 yards. Montgomery had three carries for 11 yards before leaving.

The run game, two timely interceptions from the Bears defense and Santos’ three field goals helped the Bears keep pace with the Texans despite Fields completing just 8 of 17 passes for 106 yards, no touchdowns and two interceptions. He was sacked five times for a loss of 24 yards. It was a poor follow-up to a week in which Bears coaches faced many questions about their lack of production in the passing game.

“Straight up I just played like — I want to say the A word, but I’m not going to do that,” Fields said. “But I just played like trash. I played terrible and really just got to be better.”

The development of Fields is widely considered Objective A in this season of reconstruction under new general manager Ryan Poles. So the Week 3 performance was obviously disappointing, with Fields pointing to the two interceptions to Texans safety Jalen Pitre as things that bothered him most.

But the effectiveness of Herbert and the run game — and the win — should help soften the edge as Fields addresses his mistakes this week in practice.

“When you’re working with a young quarterback in a new offense, the people around him have to be solid and have to be good,” Eberflus said. “The protection has to be good, the run game has to be good, the defense has to be really good, and special teams we’ve got to be awesome. You support that quarterback while he’s growing and while he’s going through this. There’s going to be good, and there’s going to be things he has to improve on. But that’s the whole football team.”

Herbert was happy to do his part.

“I told 32 (Montgomery) that was for him today,” Herbert said. “We held it down and did good today.”

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Playing ‘Lamar football,’ Jackson dazzles again, defense steps up late to lead Ravens over Patriots, 37-26

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Playing ‘Lamar Football,’ Jackson Dazzles Again, Defense Steps Up Late To Lead Ravens Over Patriots, 37-26
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John Harbaugh has lived a very specific football life enough times by now to know what is possible with The Lamar Jackson Experience. Before every game, there are critics. During the game, there are generational performances, things that only the Ravens’ star quarterback can do. After the game, there are questions about the dissonance between what is said and what is seen.

“Every time we have a press conference, I basically say the same thing because it’s true every week,” the Ravens’ coach said after Jackson’s historic afternoon had lifted their team to a 37-26 win Sunday over the New England Patriots. “Yeah, if there’s people out there that doubt that at this point in time, I don’t know what to say to them. I don’t think we can help them at this point.”

Harbaugh did not throw up his hands because, well, he’s the one with Jackson, who accounted for five touchdowns. The Patriots (1-2) on Sunday had more yards, better injury luck, home-field advantage at Gillette Stadium, a game plan crafted by Hall of Fame coach Bill Belichick. Still they lost.

There was only so much they could do to stop what Jackson later called “Lamar football,” his unique brand of dual-threat excellence, the kind that rewrites history as it chugs along. In finishing 18-for-29 for 218 yards, four touchdowns and an interception, along with 11 carries for a game-high 107 yards and a score, Jackson became the first player in NFL history to record back-to-back games with at least three touchdown passes and 100 rushing yards, according to Elias Sports.

A week earlier, a fourth-quarter collapse in Baltimore had spoiled Jackson’s superlative afternoon in a last-minute loss to the Miami Dolphins. On Sunday, against a team they’d never defeated in a regular-season road game, the Ravens (2-1) got Jackson’s near-expected excellence on offense and some late-arriving help on defense. Only then, after eight total touchdowns and six total turnovers, was order imposed on a game that had teetered wildly for much of the afternoon.

“We were locked in on the Patriots,” Jackson said. “We didn’t dwell on that loss [to Miami]. Probably Monday, we dwelled on it. Tuesday, we dwelled on it. After that, it was on to the Patriots. I feel like we showed that today.”

In some ways, it was vintage Jackson. He followed his NFL record-breaking 11th career 100-yard game with his 12th. He had a 38-yard keeper in the third quarter on a touchdown drive that helped the Ravens start to separate, then put the game away for good with a 9-yard score with just over three minutes remaining.

There were also flashes of a Jackson rarely glimpsed before this season, a quarterback happily trusting of even covered receivers. At times, a defender with his head turned to the play was all the green light Jackson needed.

On his 16-yard touchdown pass to Mark Andrews in the second quarter, he asked his All-Pro tight end to win a jump ball over safety Devin McCourty. On his 4-yard touchdown pass to Devin Duvernay that extended the Ravens’ third-quarter lead to 28-20, Jackson trusted the emerging wide receiver to get both feet in in the corner of the end zone. On his 13-yard pass that Rashod Bateman turned into a 35-yard catch-and-run on the Ravens’ put-away drive, Jackson gave the wide receiver who’d just fumbled in the open field the chance to do something in space.

Andrews did, Duvernay did and Bateman did.

“He’s just elite, man,” Andrews (eight catches for 89 yards and two touchdowns) said of Jackson. “Just everything that he does for this program, the way he plays on and off the field, he’s in an elite division, for sure.”

Said cornerback Marlon Humphrey: “I’m going to enjoy watching him. Hopefully, we’re wearing the same jersey forever. What the guy does day in and day out, I think nobody can duplicate it in the league.”

The win was all the more remarkable because of whom the Ravens had lost along the way to the finish line. First it was Patrick Mekari (sprained ankle), the Ravens’ second starting left tackle to leave a game in the first three weeks. Then it was Justin Houston (strained groin), one of just two Ravens outside linebackers on the team’s 53-man roster. Finally it was defensive tackle Michael Pierce, who was carted off with an arm injury; his long-term prognosis is unknown.

With Mekari out, the Ravens turned to rookie Daniel Faalele, who played exclusively on the right side at Minnesota. After some early struggles in pass protection — Jackson was sacked four times, all in the first half — Faalele and the line stabilized, paving the way for a breakthrough running performance.

Over the first two weeks, the Ravens’ renowned ground game had amassed just 218 yards on 46 carries, much of them coming on Jackson’s 75-yard sprint against Miami. On Sunday, bolstered by the emergence of running back Justice Hill (six carries for 60 yards) and the season debut of running back J.K. Dobbins (seven carries for 23 yards), they had 26 carries for 188 yards (7.2 per carry).

“Everybody was locked in,” Jackson said. “They were determined as well. … Shoutout to my linemen.”

With the Ravens’ outside pass rush minimized and their defensive line pushed around by New England’s offensive line (145 yards rushing), the secondary saved its best for last. It wasn’t a high bar to clear, not after Miami’s Tua Tagovailoa passed for 469 yards and six touchdowns in the Ravens’ home opener, not after New England’s Mac Jones went 10-for-13 for 142 yards in the first half despite missing top wide receiver Jakobi Meyers.

After the Patriots opened the second half with a go-ahead touchdown run, the Ravens forced a turnover or punt on five of New England’s final six possessions. Inside linebacker Josh Bynes’ interception helped set up the Ravens for a 31-20 lead late in the third quarter. Humphrey’s red-zone interception and rookie safety Kyle Hamilton’s come-from-behind punch-out preserved the Ravens’ five-point margin in the fourth quarter. And cornerback Marcus Peters’ interception — his second turnover in his second game back, having already fallen on Hamilton’s forced fumble — sent Jackson out onto the field in victory formation.

“Every game stands on its own two feet,” said Harbaugh, who later unfurled a paper stashed away in his back pocket and read from it. “‘There is no better than adversity. Every defeat, every heartbreak, every loss contains its own seed, its lesson on how to improve your performance next time.’ That’s Malcolm X. That’s the lesson to me.”

The Ravens will have to be better in Week 4, when they welcome the 2-1 Buffalo Bills, a Super Bowl favorite, to Baltimore. Jones (321 passing yards) was the third quarterback in as many games to pass for at least 300 yards against the defense, and the Patriots were the third rushing offense to average at least 4.8 yards per carry, a near-unimaginable figure for a defense that had boasted of its line-of-scrimmage dominance.

Some injury luck would help. So would the arrival of free-agent edge rusher Jason Pierre Paul, whose one-year deal is expected to be finalized soon. Another week of self-study for an inconsistent defense couldn’t hurt.

But as long as the Ravens have their quarterback, they will take their chances. There’s only one team in the NFL that can play “Lamar football.” There’s only one player who makes it possible.

“I’m amazed every time,” defensive lineman Calais Campbell said. “It’s a front-row seat. You’re watching greatness. That guy is very special. He’s fun to watch. I’m glad I don’t have to play against him.”

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Despite just three catches for 14 yards, Justin Jefferson’s presence was felt in win over Detroit

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Despite Just Three Catches For 14 Yards, Justin Jefferson’s Presence Was Felt In Win Over Detroit
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Late in the Vikings’ 28-24 victory over Detroit on Sunday, head coach Kevin O’Connell and star wide receiver Justin Jefferson had a talk on the sidelines. It had been a difficult game for Jefferson, and would remain so.

But don’t believe the stats, O’Connell said after the Vikings rallied to win on Kirk Cousins’ 28-yard touchdown pass to K.J. Osborn with 50 seconds remaining at U.S. Bank Stadium.

“Justin had a huge impact on this game, it just didn’t show up on the stat sheet,” O’Connell said.

The Lions crowded, shoved and grabbed Jefferson — who had 196 catches for 3,016 yards and 17 touchdowns in his first two seasons — all day. He finished with three catches for a career-low 14 yards. And he was bummed.

“It’s frustrating, for sure,” he said afterward. “But I asked for it.”

Indeed. The 6-foot-1, 195-pound receiver out of LSU will be the focus of most, if not all opposing defenses for the rest of the season. He’s just that good. With Jefferson taken out of the offense, Adam Thielen (six catches, 61 yards and a touchdown) and Osborn (5-73-1) got the lion’s share of Cousins’ targets, which was enough to beat the Lions on Sunday.

Still, that’s not good enough, O’Connell said.

Jefferson’s presence may dictate the way a defense attacks Minnesota, and lead to success for teammates, but the Vikings need Jefferson doing what he does. In a season-opening victory over Green Bay, he caught nine passes for 184 yards and two touchdowns, averaging more than 20 yards a catch.

You don’t waste that as a decoy.

“I’ve got to do a better job getting Justin aspects of lining up in different spots and personnel groupings — whatever I need to do to help,” O’Connell said. “Because he’s an ultra-competitor, and we’ll get him going.”

“I have a lot of respect,” the coach added, “for how Justin handled today.”

It wasn’t easy.

“It’s definitely difficult to keep my cool during that moment,” Jefferson said. “Of course I want the ball. Of course I want to be a playmaker, do stuff for my team. But when that stuff comes, I can’t really do too much about it. I mean, just listening to the play calls, doing what I’m told, and K.J. and Adam getting wide open because they’re getting those one-on-one coverages.

“So it’s definitely good to see them winning their battles, and we’re going to keep doing this throughout the season.”

Osborn’s numbers were season-highs, and he broke free for a potential touchdown in the first half only to be overthrown by Cousins, who heaved his pass just before being leveled by a Lions defender. He has caught more than five passes just twice in a game in three pro seasons, the last time six receptions — including the winning touchdown — in a 34-27 victory at Carolina on Oct. 17, 2021.

Being targeted eight times on Sunday, he said, “felt amazing, man.”

“I read a book called ‘Chop Wood, Carry Water,’ ” Osborn added. Each play, keep chopping, keep chopping, play the next play and the ups and downs, keep fighting. I came out on top, we came out on top, and it feels good.”

Jefferson was one of the first players to greet Osborn after his touchdown.

“All of us are playmakers. All of us have that talent to really win in this league,” Jefferson said. “So, when I seen him open, it was a no-brainer. I expected that, and I’m definitely happy for him.”

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Jets need Zach Wilson back in a major way

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Jets Need Zach Wilson Back In A Major Way
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Stop me when you’ve heard this before, the Jets’ mental mistakes were ultimately their downfall on Sunday afternoon.

Just like in the Week 1 loss to the Baltimore Ravens two weeks ago, the Jets just couldn’t get out of their own way in their 27-12 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals Sunday.

It is easy to point the finger at the offense and say that’s the source of Gang Green’s issues, but their problems are much deeper than that. The offensive line gave Joe Flacco zero time in the pocket as he was sacked four times.

However, they desperately need quarterback Zach Wilson to return against the Pittsburgh Steelers.

After his stellar performance against the Cleveland Browns last week, the Jets fans went back to chanting for Mike White against the Bengals and deservingly so. Flacco had his worst outing of the season as he completed 28 of 52 passes for 285 yards and two interceptions and coughed up the ball twice.

“When you’re not winning football games, fans want you to go out there and win football games,” Flacco said. “They’re here to watch football, but they’re here to watch their team win.

“You get the frustration, but at the same time, it is a two-score game and we have more important things to worry about than that stuff. We just have to go play football, then that stuff, it’s going to happen.”

Earlier this month, Saleh said Wilson wouldn’t return before the Jets’ Week 4 matchup at the Pittsburgh Steelers. Wilson has been working his way back from his meniscus trim and bone bruise injury he suffered during the first week of the preseason.

During the last couple of weeks, Wilson has taken part in practice on a limited basis working with trainers and throwing the football. On Sunday, Wilson threw to some Jets players, including tight end Tyler Conklin. There was no brace or no sleeve on his surgically repaired right knee.

After the game, Saleh said Wilson would be evaluated on Monday but declined to say if the second-year player would start next week.

Either way, the Jets need some sort of energy for this offense, their defense and the rest of the team. The jury is still out on if Wilson is the Jets’ answer at the quarterback position.

No, Wilson won’t help fix the mental mistakes the Jets are making defensively, as, throughout the day, they suffered from drop passes, turnovers, missed assignments and penalties. Those include a Franklin-Myers unnecessary roughness penalty on third down he received for touching Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow after the ball was released.

Had the Jets not had that personal foul called, the Bengals would have punted. Instead, the Bengals scored their second touchdown of the day on a Tyler Boyd 56-yard reception.

Speaking of Boyd’s touchdown, safety Jordan Whitehead tried to tackle him by using his shoulder. It didn’t work and Boyd ran all the way to the end zone for six points.

“Our vets are making critical mistakes,” Jets coach Robert Saleh said. “JFL [John Franklin-Myers] personal foul, ticky-tack or not, that just can’t happen. And Corey [Davis] obviously with the penalty he had.

“It has to get fixed.”

Later in the game, as the Jets were possibly set to score their first touchdown of the game, Davis was called for a personal foul.

That penalty proved to be backbreaking as the 15-yard penalty took the Jets from 3rd and six to 3rd and 21. Gang Green eventually went for it on fourth down and Flacco was sacked and the team turned it over on downs.

“Mental errors, especially on the back end, which we can’t have,” cornerback D.J. Reed said. “Teams are too good.

“They had the touchdown, ok, clap it up. But the other stuff is mental errors. We have to make it simple so we can stop with the mental errors, we have to communicate more, whatever the case might be.

“We have to get it fixed.”

Having Wilson back could indeed be the step in the right direction to have this team believing they have a chance to win every Sunday. Especially on offense where the Jets look lifeless at times.

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Mike Preston’s report card: Position-by-position grades for Ravens’ 37-26 win over Patriots | COMMENTARY

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Mike Preston’s Report Card: Position-By-Position Grades For Ravens’ 37-26 Win Over Patriots | Commentary
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Here’s how the Ravens graded out at each position after a 37-26 win over the New England Patriots in Week 3 on Sunday at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts.

Quarterback

Lamar Jackson ran for 107 yards on 11 carries and completed 18 of 29 passes for 218 yards and four touchdowns. During most of the game, he was the team’s entire offense, but he also missed some open receivers and struggled in the second quarter when he stopped stepping into his throws. His touchdown pass to tight end Mark Andrews in the second quarter was underthrown and could easily have been intercepted. On this team, however, he is the difference-maker. Grade: B

Running backs

For the first time this season, the Ravens earned some respect. Fourth-year player Justice Hill had shown gradual improvement in the first two weeks and finished with 60 yards on six carries Sunday, but he also struggled in pass protection. Playing in his first game since suffering a knee injury in last year’s preseason finale, J.K. Dobbins recorded 23 yards on seven carries and caught two passes for 17 yards. The running game got stronger in the second half and Dobbins even made some defenders miss or ran through them. Grade: C

Offensive line

The Ravens struggled in the first half, especially after left tackle Patrick Mekari went down with an ankle injury and had to be replaced by rookie Daniel Faalele. The offensive line allowed four sacks, but this group got in a rhythm in the second half, especially with Jackson darting off tackle on running plays. The Ravens still need to be more consistent run blocking, as Hill’s 34-yard carry accounted for most of the running backs’ production. Grade: C+

Receivers

New England coach Bill Belichick is famous for taking away the opposing team’s top offensive weapons, but he couldn’t slow down Jackson nor Andrews, who had eight catches for 89 yards and two touchdowns. The receivers weren’t much of a factor until the second half but made some big plays when it mattered most. Rashod Bateman finished with two catches for 59 yards and Devin Duvernay had two catches for 25 yards, including a 4-yard touchdown in the corner of the end zone to extend the Ravens’ lead late in the third quarter. Grade: C+

Defensive line

The Patriots finished with 447 yards of total offense, including 145 rushing yards on 28 attempts. That’s pretty concerning, especially since New England’s longest carry went for 18 yards. . Justin Madubuike (one sack, two tackles for loss) was dominant in the second half after struggling in the first and fellow defensive end Calais Campbell turned in a solid effort, but nose tackle Broderick Washington got pushed off the ball consistently. The Ravens also lost nose tackle Michael Pierce to a left arm injury. The Patriots weren’t cute, they just ran straight ahead. Grade: D

Linebackers

It’s a toss-up between which position group is worse, the linebackers or the secondary. Inside linebacker Josh Bynes led the team in tackles with 10, but a lot of those were away from the line of scrimmage. Both he and weak-side linebacker Patrick Queen (five tackles, one sack) had trouble getting off blocks. Outside linebacker Odafe Oweh finished with five tackles but still wasn’t much of a threat as a pass rusher, which was supposed to be his forte coming out of college. Veteran outside linebacker Justin Houston went down with a groin injury and didn’t return. Grade: D

Secondary

Cornerbacks Marlon Humphrey and Marcus Peters each contributed to game-saving turnovers in the fourth quarter, but the Ravens allowed 321 passing yards to second-year quarterback Mac Jones, who often threw behind or late to his receivers. Rookie cornerback Jalyn Armour-Davis started the game but quickly earned a spot on the bench after getting beat twice in the first quarter. Safety Marcus Williams covers a lot of ground on the backend for the Ravens, but he’s not superman. Grade: D

Special teams

Duvernay has become a weapon on special teams, as evidenced by his 43-yard punt return in the second half. Justin Tucker made a 53-yard field goal late in the game but missed an extra-point attempt after the team’s final touchdown. Rookie Jordan Stout also shanked a punt in crunch time, his second in three games this season. He might need a little more tutoring from assistant special teams coach and former Ravens punter Sam Koch. Grade: B

Coaching

There are times when offensive coordinator Greg Roman dials up plays that make the Ravens look unbeatable and other times when it appears to be street ball. First-year defensive coordinator Mike Macdonald also has to improve his unit after another shaky performance. Coach John Harbaugh might have to take a harder look at defensive backs coach Chris Hewitt. Something is missing on the back end of this defense. Grade: C+

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