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The bathrooms of houses for sale in Canada are… strange. “People do it differently in the north”

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The Bathrooms Of Houses For Sale In Canada Are... Strange. “People Do It Differently In The North”
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An estate on the real estate market in Ontario, Canada for $2.29 million will enchant some with its fairytale interior, but others? Well, they’re a little confused.

Outside

Outside

The lakeside property has a “resort setting,” according to the listing on Zillow.com, and even comes with a dock that’s a “combined boathouse-barge,” sure to appeal to lovers water and outdoor enthusiasts.

BoathouseBoathouse

boathouse

While the grounds are attractive, it’s the six bedrooms and four bathrooms inside that might seem playful – or alarming. Especially the bathrooms that look like something straight out of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”.

BathroomBathroom

Bathroom

At least some of them do.

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Bathroom

The rest of the house carries a charming aesthetic, however.

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Bathroom

Features include:

InteriorInterior

Interior

Dining Area/KitchenDining Area/Kitchen

Dining area/kitchen

There’s also what appears to be a swivel bed and a bunk bed that includes a slide.

BedroomBedroom

Bedroom

But it was these bathrooms that caught the attention of fans of Friday Night Zillowa fun Twitter hashtag focused on quirky homes in the real estate market run by Bloomberg congressional reporter Steven Dennis.

BedroomBedroom

Bedroom

“I have questions,” one person quotes-tweeted about the stone shower.

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Bedroom

“I am eager to see the toilets“said another.

BedroomBedroom

Bedroom

party shower made of stone!” someone tweeted.

InteriorInterior

Interior

“Their culture is far superior“, one person noted.

BathroomBathroom

Bathroom

“Wait to see the soap dispenser,” someone said.

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Bathroom

“Could be illegal in many Southern states…,” another joked.

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Interior

“People do things differently North“, one person tweeted.

OutsideOutside

Outside

California’s “most eclectic home” lives up to its name. Discover the “House of Sin”

The basement of this Ohio home is freaking out Zillow Gone Wild. ‘I’m so afraid’

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Tommies love their tight ends, especially those worthy of the labels ’86’ and ‘U.’ This season, that’s Max Zimmerman

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Tommies Love Their Tight Ends, Especially Those Worthy Of The Labels ’86’ And ‘U.’ This Season, That’s Max Zimmerman
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St. Thomas head football coach Glenn Caruso, a native of Greenwich, Conn., will be going back to his roots on Saturday when the Tommies play at Marist in upstate New York.

When those close to the program say the New York area is where it all started for Caruso, they’re speaking, of course, about what Caruso gleefully refers to as his crazy little infatuation with the tight end position.

Growing up a huge football fan in the 1980s, Caruso fell in love with the multi-dimensional skills of Mark Bavaro, the 6-foot-4, 245-pound “Italian” tight end of the New York Giants.  And while his own body was not that of a tight end, Caruso admired the position and those who played it from afar — through his own playing days and into his coaching career.

Now, he collects them.

The Tommies’ traveling party to Poughkeepsie, N.Y., will include 60 players;  five of them will be among the 10 tight ends on the roster.

“In having built our system up over the last 24 years,” Caruso said, “we need to populate it appropriately.”

Caruso shares his affinity for the tight end position with one of his best friends, Andy Bischoff, the former offensive line coach at Cretin-Derham Hall who is now tight ends coach for the New York Giants. The two of them have had many late-night talks, Caruso said, focused on ways to maximize a tight end’s unique skill set.

Caruso continues to have those discussions with his offensive staff, and nuanced advancements have taken place to where there are sub-sets of tight ends in the Tommies’ offense. There’s traditional tight end, the B, known for his blocking, who lines up next to one of the tackles. And there’s the V, who normally is a converted wide receiver. The third type is the most unique, and in many ways most important type — the U.

The U is what Caruso called the Jack of all trades. “They can do all types of things for us,” he said. “They can line up as a wide receiver, they can line up as in an in-line tight end, they can line up as a wing or as a fullback. It allows the offense to be fluid without having to put specific players, in, which tips off what you’re trying to do.

“So it allows you to have a personnel group that looks the same until you get lined up in a formation.”

The starting U tight end is given jersey number 86, a tradition that started 15 years ago with Jake Friederichs, whom Caruso described as an undersized center with good hands from Totino-Grace High School. Matt Allen, a converted offensive tackle, manned the position next, and Caruso considers him one of the best blockers he’s ever coached.

Four years later, it was Matt Christenson’s turn. “He was probably the most dynamic 86 we ever had,” Caruso said. “He was a converted running back and linebacker from nine-man football.”

More often that not, the U tight end comes in already having established himself as a special player. Not the most talented, but one who proved valuable nonetheless.

“When you go into a high school,’ Caruso said, “and the coach says, ‘Man, I don’t know what position this kid is going to play, but he’s a big athlete and can do a lot of things,’ I say, ‘We have a spot for that, coach.’

“I never wanted to go into recruiting and not have a spot for a guy who is, flat out, a football player.”

The Tommies’ current No. 86 fits that description. Fifth-year senior Max Zimmerman is a carryover from St. Thomas’ Division III days, and a throwback-type player. He lined up all over the field for Brainerd High School, which he said helped prepare him for his role as a U tight end.

“A tough, thoughtful football player,” Caruso said when asked to describe Zimmerman, who credits those who played the position before him for showing the way.

“There’s been a huge legacy of tight ends here,” Zimmerman said. “They’ve always been great team guys, great leaders. They kind of built the foundations for our teams. Jake Friederichs laid that foundation when he came.”

These days, many of the Tommies’ tight ends resemble Adonis in cleats: Aiden Carlson 6-foot-5, 241 pounds; Matthew Rink, 6-5, 257; John McBride, 6-5, 244. And then there’s Zimmerman, listed at 6-2, 238.

“I’m not chiseled,” Zimmerman said.

That’s not a problem.

“People say, ‘What do you look for in the position?’ ” Caruso said. “I say it’s like the wind; I don’t look for it, but I feel it when it comes. The guy doesn’t have to be blindingly fast or the most dominant blocker. But he has to be a true intuitive football guy.”

Things definitely have changed, Zimmerman said, from when he first joined the program.

“I am just about the shortest and smallest guy on the offense,” he said. “I can barely see the quarterback when all the offensive linemen are standing up.”

What hasn’t changed is the U tight end, and Caruso’s unique relationship with the position. Not surprisingly, Zimmerman’s response to how he has been able to hang onto his starting position sounds a lot like a description of the position itself.

“It comes back to our culture and what the people around me have done,” Zimmerman said. “Just working on technique every day, and contributing to the team the best way I can in any role I can.”

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Ian makes landfall again, this time in South Carolina

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Ian Makes Landfall Again, This Time In South Carolina
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By MEG KINNARD and ADRIANA GOMEZ LICON

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Hurricane Ian has made another landfall, this time in South Carolina, after carving a swath of destruction across Florida earlier this week.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Ian’s center came ashore Friday afternoon near Georgetown with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (140 kph).

Ian hit Florida’s Gulf Coast as a powerful Category 4 hurricane with 150 mph (240 kph) winds Wednesday, flooding homes and leaving nearly 2.7 million people without power.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below.

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — A revived Hurricane Ian threatened coastal South Carolina and the historic city of Charleston with severe flooding Friday after the deadly storm caused catastrophic damage in Florida and trapped thousands in their homes.

Sheets of rain whipped trees and power lines and left many areas on Charleston’s downtown peninsula under water by midday. A popular pier in the beach community of Pawleys Island collapsed and floated away. Ian’s anticipated landfall was expected to coincide with high tide, which would make flooding worse.

Ian left a broad swath of destruction after it came ashore on Florida’s Gulf Coast as one of the strongest storms ever to hit the U.S. The storm flooded areas on both of Florida’s coasts, tore homes from their slabs, demolished beachfront businesses and left more than 2 million people without power. At least nine people were confirmed dead in the U.S. — a number that was almost certain to increase as officials confirm more deaths and search for people.

With winds holding at 85 mph (140 kph), the National Hurricane Center’s update at 11 a.m. Friday placed Ian about 60 miles (95 km) southeast of Charleston.

The center’s hurricane warning stretched from the Savannah River to Cape Fear. The forecast predicted a storm surge of up to 7 feet (2.1 meters) into some Carolina coastal areas, and rainfall of up to 8 inches (20 centimeters).

In Florida, rescue crews piloted boats and waded through riverine streets Thursday to save thousands of people trapped amid flooded homes and buildings shattered by Hurricane Ian.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Friday that rescue crews had gone door-to-door to over 3,000 homes in the hardest-hit areas.

“There’s really been a Herculean effort,” he said during a news conference in Tallahassee.

Climate change added at least 10% more rain to Hurricane Ian, according to a study prepared immediately after the storm, said its co-author, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab climate scientist Michael Wehner.

Among those killed were an 80-year-old woman and a 94-year-old man who relied on oxygen machines that stopped working amid power outages, as well as a a 67-year-old man who was waiting to be rescued died after falling into rising water inside his home, authorities said.

Officials fear the death toll could rise substantially, given the wide territory swamped by the storm.

Florida Division of Emergency Management Director Kevin Guthrie said responders have focused so far on “hasty” searches, aimed at emergency rescues and initial assessments, which will be followed by two additional waves of searches. Initial responders who come across possible remains are leaving them without confirming, he said Friday, describing as an example the case of a submerged home.

“The water was up over the rooftop, right, but we had a Coast Guard rescue swimmer swim down into it and he could identify that it appeared to be human remains. We do not know exactly how many,” Guthrie said.

At least three people were reported killed in Cuba after the hurricane struck there on Tuesday.

In Florida, businesses near Fort Myers Beach were completely razed, leaving twisted debris. Broken docks floated at odd angles beside damaged boats. Fires smoldered on lots where houses once stood.

“I don’t know how anyone could have survived in there,” William Goodison said amid the wreckage of a mobile home park where he’d lived for 11 years. Goodison rode out the storm at his son’s house inland.

The hurricane tore through the park of about 60 homes, leaving many destroyed or mangled beyond repair, including Goodison’s. Wading through waist-deep water, Goodison and his son wheeled two trash cans containing what little he could salvage — a portable air conditioner, some tools and a baseball bat.

The road into Fort Myers Beach was littered with broken trees, boat trailers and other debris. Cars were abandoned in the road, having stalled when the storm surge flooded their engines.

Emergency crews sawed through toppled trees to reach stranded people. Many in the hardest-hit areas were unable to call for help because of electrical and cellular outages.

A chunk of the Sanibel Causeway fell into the sea, cutting off access to the barrier island where 6,300 people live.

Hours after weakening to a tropical storm while crossing the Florida peninsula, Ian regained strength Thursday evening over the Atlantic. The National Hurricane Center predicted it would hit South Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane Friday, still much weaker than the Category 4 hurricane it was on Wednesday.

National Guard troops were being positioned in South Carolina to help with the aftermath, including any water rescues. And in Washington, President Joe Biden approved an emergency declaration for the state, a needed step to speed federal assist for recovery once Ian passes.

In North Carolina, Gov. Roy Cooper urged residents to prepare for torrents of rain, high winds and potential power outages.

___

Gomez Licon reported from Punta Gorda, Florida; Associated Press contributors include Terry Spencer and Tim Reynolds in Fort Myers, Florida; Cody Jackson in Tampa, Florida; Freida Frisaro in Miami; Mike Schneider in Orlando, Florida; Seth Borenstein in Washington; and Bobby Caina Calvan in New York.

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Vikings have been NFL ‘pioneers’ in playing overseas. Next stop: Back in London

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Vikings Have Been Nfl ‘Pioneers’ In Playing Overseas. Next Stop: London
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After the announcement in May that the Vikings would play the New Orleans Saints on Sunday in London, the team quickly went to work making arrangements for the trip. Plans got underway to ship food overseas, fill out customs forms, consult sleep experts for advice on adjusting to the six-hour time difference, and much more.

As far as former Minnesota tight end Steve Jordan is concerned, let’s just say such a trip was much simpler four decades ago. Jordan was on the Vikings team that defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 28-10 in an Aug. 6, 1983 exhibition that was the first NFL game played in the United Kingdom.

“We got in at like 7 in the morning and went right to a practice, and I remember being so tired when we were stretching before the practice that I literally fell asleep when I was stretching,” Jordan said.

And the food back then in London?

“Very greasy,” Jordan said.

And the beer?

“It was not cold, almost like room temperature,” he said.

Things have changed since then. NFL teams have been coming regularly to London for regular-season games since 2007, and players apparently no longer fall asleep on the field. The food is better in the city, whether teams bring their own or not. Cold beer is plentiful.

And Jordan is back in London.

Jordan, who played for the Vikings from 1982-94 and made six Pro Bowls, is the father of Saints star defensive end Cameron Jordan. He arrived in London on Thursday and will attend Sunday’s game at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium along with his daughter-in-law Nikki and grandson Tank, 7.

This is actually Jordan’s second trip back in recent years to watch a game in London, having attended the Saints’ 20-0 win over Miami in 2017. So he has some additional perspective there. And when he’s sitting in the stands Sunday, Jordan figures he will reflect on how far the NFL has come in playing international games.

“We were pioneers back in 1983,” Jordan said. “I remember the first game we played there, they would put on the scoreboard, ‘A field goal is worth three points, an extra point is one point,’ and that kind of thing. Somebody might make a diving catch and the crowd would be silent but then if somebody was blown up going across the middle, the crowd would go wild. I kind of juxtapose that with what it’s like 30-some years later.”

Now, many Brits really know their football. NFL games are show regularly on television. The internet, with social media, has aided in the continued growth of the game.

And it’s not just in the United Kingdom where interest in the NFL has blossomed, it’s in many other parts of the world. And the Vikings deserve some credit in getting it all started.

Not only did the Vikings take the field for the first game in London, they also played the first game in continental Europe, a 1988 exhibition against Chicago in Gothenburg, Sweden. They went to Germany in 1993 for a preseason game in Berlin against Buffalo and in 1994 to Japan for an exhibition against Kansas City in Tokyo. Three decades after the Vikings were in Germany, the NFL will play its first regular-season game there when Tampa Bay faces Seattle on Nov. 13 in Munich.

The Vikings on Sunday will play their third-regular season game in London over the past decade. They previously defeated Pittsburgh 34-27 in 2013 at Wembley Stadium and Cleveland 33-16 at Twickenham Stadium.

Put it all together, and the Vikings have become a popular team overseas.

“It was exciting that we went and played a football game in a country that had not seen live American football,” said Carl Lee, a Vikings defensive back from 1983-93 who played in the London game as a rookie in 1983 and later suited up for the Sweden and Germany games. “When you look back on it, I’m happy to say that I was part of the start of that, and the Vikings organization has been kind of a pioneer in overseas games.”

Lee said it helped the franchise initially gain international fans because, from a historical perspective, there always has been “kind of a mystique about Vikings.” When running back Rickey Young played in the 1983 game, he said British fans “thought we were Norsemen, like we were real Vikings from the ship.”

That game was dubbed “The Global Cup” and played at the old Wembley Stadium, which closed in 2000. A crowd 32,847, which was about half capacity, showed up. Many of the fans were curiosity seekers.

Goalposts had to be shipped in for the game, and the Vikings were responsible for bringing in the first-down chains. Minnesota equipment manager Dennis Ryan, who has been with the team since 1975, remembers players dressing in a band room at the stadium and each player got a chair for gear.

“When the truck did arrive, (then head coach Bud Grant) had the players all help us get the gear to the band room, which was at the top of the first level of Wembley Stadium,” Ryan said.

Ryan’s favorite story from that game long has been about the miscommunication with game officials when Vikings officials said their coaches needed to go to the press box at halftime. Locals in England equate the word “coach” to a bus that provides public transportation.

“They said, ‘You want your coaches up in the press box? We have an elevator, but our lift isn’t being enough for your coaches,’ ” Ryan said. “We said, ‘Well, we can take them through the stands.”

Game officials soon suggested a crane could be brought in for the Vikings’ coaches. It was then that Ryan realized “they had thought we wanted our busses up in the press box.”

Five years later, the Vikings headed to Sweden and the NFL still was trying to get a foothold in Europe. Another half-capacity crowd of 33,115 was on hand when Minnesota defeated the Bears 28-21 at Ullevi Stadium.

The stadium was named after Ull, the Vikings’ god of games, so you better believe Minnesota players got their share of publicity in Sweden because of the team’s nickname.

“The Vikings, it was like going back to your origins,” said hall of fame guard Randall McDaniel, who played for Minnesota from 1988-99 and appeared in exhibition games in Sweden, Germany and Japan. “They even took us to this old castle and it was like it was back in the days. The brought us into this room with big, giant tables and there was food sitting in the middle, and I was sitting there with a big turkey leg in my hand.”

The Swedes didn’t know much about football, and McDaniel said during the game “all they seemed to really care about was when the ball was thrown in the air.”

By the time the Vikings played in Berlin in 1993, things were starting to change overseas. The fans, aided by the NFL Europe League starting up in 1991 and having a team in Germany, began to understand the game more. A sellout crowd of 67,132 showed up to see Minnesota defeat the Bills 20-6.

What actually happened on the field, though, isn’t what former Vikings players most remember about the trip. The game was played at Berlin’s Olympic Stadium, where the 1936 Olympics were held. At those Games, legendary Black athlete Jesse Owens won four gold medals in track and field and showed up Adolf Hilter and his racist beliefs of Aryanism.

“I was in awe going to the Olympic Stadium because I actually got to meet Jesse Owens when I was a kid growing in Phoenix and he came to our church once when I was about 10,” Jordan said. “I shook his hand and got his autograph on a church program, and here I am in the stadium where Hitler was and where the Olympics were and where Jesse lit it up and made such a statement to the world.”

Vikings players had a chance to tour the city. They visited remnants of the Berlin Wall, which had been torn down in 1989.

“I don’t remember anything about that football game but I remember going to see the sights,” said Sean Salisbury, a Vikings quarterback from 1990-94. “I’m a big history buff. It hadn’t been that long since the Wall had come down, and I remember seeing pieces of brick on the streets that had been broken from when the Wall came down. It was just eerie.”

The Vikings didn’t waste any time before their next trip overseas. The following year, they traveled 6,000 miles to Tokyo, which remains the farthest they ever have gone for a game.

The Vikings defeated the Chiefs 17-9 at the Tokyo Dome before a sellout crowd of 49,555. The most popular players on the trip for the Vikings were quarterback Warren Moon and wide receiver Cris Carter, both future hall of famers. They signed numerous autographs, and Japanese fans often expressed their gratitude when they got one with a bow.

“When we would go out to eat, the chefs would come out and honor us for eating their food,” McDaniel said. “They came out and bowed and asked if we enjoyed the food.”

McDaniel did. What he didn’t enjoy was trying to adjust to a time zone 14 hours ahead.

“It was brutal,” he said.

The international trips for the Vikings now are not that long, but they are held in the regular season. And that makes a big difference.

“When we went over, it was always preseason, and we stayed longer,” McDaniel said. “There was no rush to come back. But now you fly over and then you play and then you fly back, so I don’t know if I would have liked to have gone over there for a regular-season game. That would truly have thrown my routine off.”

Mindful of not wanting that to happen to players, the Vikings flew to London on Thursday night, arrived Friday morning, and will fly home immediately after the game. Executive director of health and performance Tyler Williams said the Vikings don’t want players to fully acclimate to the six-hour time difference because they then would need to fully acclimate back, a problem since they have a game Oct. 9 against Chicago at U.S. Bank Stadium. They are staying at a hotel an hour north of central London, so there hasn’t figured to be much sightseeing.

The Vikings had bye weeks following each of their two previous regular-season Sunday games in London, so they had longer trips and got some time to see the sights. In 2013, they left on Monday night and arrived Tuesday morning.

“We went and saw the Crown Jewels and stuff,” Vikings safety Harrison Smith said. “It was cool. We saw Parliament, Big Ben and all of that.”

On Sunday, Smith will become the first Vikings player to appear in three games in London. Wide receiver Adam Thielen is the only other Minnesota player remaining from the 2013 trip, but he was then a rookie on the practice squad.

Thielen shined in London in 2017, catching five passes for 98 yards and being named Man of the Match before an enthusiastic sellout crowd of 74,237. After an 18-yard touchdown reception in the second quarter from Case Keenum, he thrilled fans with a soccer slide to celebrate.

On that trip, the Vikings departed for London on Wednesday night and arrived Thursday morning. Thielen said that gave players time to check out some pubs and go to a Premier League soccer game between Arsenal and Swansea City.

Both Smith and Thielen said football fans in England were more knowledge in 2017 than in 2013, and they are expecting to see another jump in knowledge Sunday.

“They are becoming more aware of what American football is,” Thielen said. “You could tell just from the first time to the second time, just the celebrations, the cheering was more on point.”

On Sunday, one of the fans on hand will be Jordan, who said he’ll be rooting for both teams because he “can’t lose in that situation.” Since arriving in London, he already has been talking about how far the NFL has come on an international stage since he played in that 1983 game.

“I tell people I played in the first World Bowl in Europe, and I’m pretty proud of that fact,” he said. “It was great to experience that. The Vikings have been pioneers and now the Vikings are going back to Europe again. It’s exciting, and I’m certainly looking forward to the continued progression of American football in Europe.”

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Vikings’ third London game over past decade will be in a third different stadium

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Vikings’ Third London Game Over Past Decade Will Be In A Third Different Stadium
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VIKINGS (2-1) VS. SAINTS (1-2)

Kickoff: 8:30 a.m. Sunday

Where: Tottenham Hotspur Stadium

TV: KSTP-Channel 5, NFL Network; Kevin Kugler, Mark Sanchez, Laura Okmin, Jamie Erdahl.

Radio: KFXN-FM 100.3; Paul Allen, Pete Bercich, Ben Leber

Referee: Clete Blakeman

Series: Vikings lead 23-13

Line: Vikings by 3 1/2

The Vikings play their third game in London over the past decade at a third different stadium. They defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers 34-27 in 2013 at Wembley Stadium and the Cleveland Browns 33-16 in 2017 at Twickenham Stadium. This will be their first London game on artificial turf.

With quarterback Jameis Winston listed as doubtful due to back and ankle injuries, the Saints likely will start Andy Dalton. He was Cincinnati’s quarterback in a 2016 game in London when the Bengals tied Washington 27-27. Vikings quarterback Kirk Cousins was with Washington then, and threw for 458 yards in that game, still a London record.

The Vikings are expected to have running back Dalvin Cook available after he left last Sunday’s 28-24 win over Detroit in the third quarter with a shoulder injury. But edge rusher Za’Darius Smith is listed as questionable due to a knee injury suffered in that game.

The teams last played on Christmas Day in New Orleans in 2020, when Saints running back Alvin Kamara tied an NFL record by scoring six touchdowns in a game in a 52-33 rout. Minnesota’s last two playoff wins have been over New Orleans, 29-24 in the “Minneapolis Miracle” game in January 2018 and 26-20 in overtime in January 2020.

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Spoelstra says Heat preseason to feature a variety of lineups; Lowry stresses internal growth

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Spoelstra Says Heat Preseason To Feature A Variety Of Lineups; Lowry Stresses Internal Growth
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Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra warned Friday that what you see during the preseason from his team is not what you might get when the season starts.

So, yes, those who are curious about bigger lineups, perhaps ones that feature two out of Bam Adebayo, Dewayne Dedmon and Omer Yurtseven, there will be some of that over the course of the Heat’s five-game exhibition schedule. And those seeking a three-wing smaller-ball approach, that also could come into view with Kyle Lowry, Tyler Herro and Victor Oladipo.

Basically, the laboratory will be open for experimentation.

“There’ll probably be a decent amount of that,” Spoelstra said Friday, as his team continued training camp at the Baha Mar resort. “I mean, we do that every training camp and preseason, anyway. Our versatility is a really important part of our makeup, and you have to be able to take a look at different combinations just to see what they look like against competition.

“I like the fact that we’ve had these different kinds of lineups that we can get — the big lineup, the speed lineup, the shooting lineup. So you’ll see a decent amount of those.”

Bally Sports Sun announced Friday that it would carry all five of the Heat’s exhibitions, starting with Tuesday night’s game at FTX Arena against the Minnesota Timberwolves, the first of three exhibitions next week.

Taking note

Lowry said Friday he is using training camp to go to school on improvements from within on a roster that largely returned intact.

“I think we’ve just got guys that are individually trying to get better,” he said. “I think that’s where it’s something different.

“You figure out what they got better at.”

While Lowry, 36, said the team’s veterans “are just getting our legs under us,” he said the younger players are setting the tone at practice.

“It’s tough when you’ve got a lot of veterans,” he said, “but those guys are playing extremely hard and extremely well right now.”

Included in that group is first-round pick Nikola Jovic, the lithe 19-year-old forward out of Serbia.

“He’s young,” Lowry said with a laugh. “He’s got some passion. He wants to be good. But it’s going to take time.”

Asked what would change if he were to potentially start in the backcourt alongside Herro, Lowry said, “What changes is he’s still got to be him. I think nothing changes for him. I think everybody’s got to adapt and adjust.”

Comedic interlude

Practice ended with a spirited debate between Adebayo and 42-year-old captain Udonis Haslem about which Spoelstra would trust more to take a final shot with a game on the line.

As Haslem attempted to elicit the support of the team’s younger players, Adebayo noted that Haslem has “only one shot you take,” alluding to Haslem’s trademark midrange baseline jumper.

The chiding came after a post-practice 3-point drill featuring Haslem, Adebayo and Dedmon.

End game

With Haslem having addressed this being his final training camp as he closes out his 20-year Heat career, Spoelstra said he doesn’t want to get caught up too soon in such moments.

“I don’t want to think about that right now. I don’t want to get emotional,” he said. “I already had to go through that with Dwyane [Wade]. I’m just very grateful that he’s here in our locker room.

“And in all these moments in between, that’s where UD can express his influence and his mentorship. He’s a top mentor in this entire association. He really is selfless. He really cares about the guys, and he’ll do anything to help them be their best.”

Last call

The Heat will host a clinic for invited local youth Saturday ahead of their final camp practice on the makeshift ballroom courts at the resort’s convention center, before then flying back to South Florida.

The team then will be off until Monday’s 6:30 p.m. public scrimmage at FTX Arena, before opening their preseason the following night.

All 20 players participated in Friday’s session, with no injuries reported since Tuesday’s first day of camp.

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Vikings have been NFL ‘pioneers’ in playing overseas. Next stop: London

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Vikings Have Been Nfl ‘Pioneers’ In Playing Overseas. Next Stop: London
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After the announcement in May that the Vikings would play the New Orleans Saints on Sunday in London, the team quickly went to work making arrangements for the trip. They had to to ship food overseas. Fill out customs forms. Consult sleep experts for advice on adjusting to the six-hour time difference. And so much more.

As far as former Vikings tight end Steve Jordan is concerned, let’s just say such a trip was much simpler four decades ago. Jordan was on the Vikings team that defeated the St. Louis Cardinals 28-10 in an Aug. 6, 1983 exhibition that was the first NFL game played in the United Kingdom.

“We got in at like 7 in the morning and went right to a practice, and I remember being so tired when we were stretching before the practice that I literally fell asleep when I was stretching,” Jordan said.

And the food back then in London?

“Very greasy,” Jordan said.

And the beer?

“It was not cold, almost like room temperature,” he said.

Things have changed since then. NFL teams have been coming regularly to London for regular-season games since 2007, and players apparently no longer fall asleep on the field. The food is better in the city, whether teams bring their own or not. Cold beer is plentiful.

And Jordan is back in London.

Jordan, who played for the Vikings from 1982-94 and made six Pro Bowls, is the father of Saints star defensive end Cameron Jordan. He arrived in London on Thursday and will attend Sunday’s game at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium along with his daughter-in-law Nikki and grandson Tank, 7.

This is actually Jordan’s second trip back in recent years to watch a game in London, having attended the Saints’ 20-0 win over Miami in 2017. So he has some additional perspective there. And when he’s sitting in the stands Sunday, Jordan figures he will reflect on how far the NFL has come in playing international games.

“We were pioneers back in 1983,” Jordan said. “I remember the first game we played there, they would put on the scoreboard, ‘A field goal is worth three points, an extra point is one point,’ and that kind of thing. Somebody might make a diving catch and the crowd would be silent but then if somebody was blown up going across the middle, the crowd would go wild. I kind of juxtapose that with what it’s like 30-some years later.”

Now, many Brits really know their football. NFL games are show regularly on television. The internet, with social media, has aided in the continued growth of the game.

And it’s not just in the United Kingdom where interest in the NFL has blossomed, it’s in many other parts of the world. And the Vikings deserve some credit in getting it all started.

Not only did the Vikings take the field for the first game in London, they also played the first game in continental Europe, a 1988 exhibition against Chicago in Gothenburg, Sweden. They went to Germany in 1993 for a preseason game in Berlin against Buffalo and in 1994 to Japan for an exhibition against Kansas City in Tokyo. Three decades after the Vikings were in Germany, the NFL will play its first regular-season game there when Tampa Bay faces Seattle on Nov. 13 in Munich.

The Vikings on Sunday will play their third-regular season game in London over the past decade. They previously defeated Pittsburgh 34-27 in 2013 at Wembley Stadium and Cleveland 33-16 at Twickenham Stadium.

Put it all together, and the Vikings have become a popular team overseas.

“It was exciting that we went and played a football game in a country that had not seen live American football,” said Carl Lee, a Vikings defensive back from 1983-93 who played in the London game as a rookie in 1983 and later suited up for the Sweden and Germany games. “When you look back on it, I’m happy to say that I was part of the start of that, and the Vikings organization has been kind of a pioneer in overseas games.”

Lee said it helped the franchise initially gain international fans because, from a historical perspective, there always has been “kind of a mystique about Vikings.” When running back Rickey Young played in the 1983 game, he said British fans “thought we were Norsemen, like we were real Vikings from the ship.”

That game was dubbed “The Global Cup” and played at the old Wembley Stadium, which closed in 2000. A crowd 32,847, which was about half capacity, showed up. Many of the fans were curiosity seekers.

Goalposts had to be shipped in for the game, and the Vikings were responsible for bringing in the first-down chains. Minnesota equipment manager Dennis Ryan, who has been with the team since 1975, remembers players dressing in a band room at the stadium and each player got a chair for gear.

“When the truck did arrive, (then head coach Bud Grant) had the players all help us get the gear to the band room, which was at the top of the first level of Wembley Stadium,” Ryan said.

Ryan’s favorite story from that game long has been about the miscommunication with game officials when Vikings officials said their coaches needed to go to the press box at halftime. Locals in England equate the word “coach” to a bus that provides public transportation.

“They said, ‘You want your coaches up in the press box? We have an elevator, but our lift isn’t being enough for your coaches,’ ” Ryan said. “We said, ‘Well, we can take them through the stands.”

Game officials soon suggested a crane could be brought in for the Vikings’ coaches. It was then that Ryan realized “they had thought we wanted our busses up in the press box.”

Five years later, the Vikings headed to Sweden and the NFL still was trying to get a foothold in Europe. Another half-capacity crowd of 33,115 was on hand when Minnesota defeated the Bears 28-21 at Ullevi Stadium.

The stadium was named after Ull, the Vikings’ god of games, so you better believe Minnesota players got their share of publicity in Sweden because of the team’s nickname.

“The Vikings, it was like going back to your origins,” said hall of fame guard Randall McDaniel, who played for Minnesota from 1988-99 and appeared in exhibition games in Sweden, Germany and Japan. “They even took us to this old castle and it was like it was back in the days. The brought us into this room with big, giant tables and there was food sitting in the middle, and I was sitting there with a big turkey leg in my hand.”

The Swedes didn’t know much about football, and McDaniel said during the game “all they seemed to really care about was when the ball was thrown in the air.”

By the time the Vikings played in Berlin in 1993, things were starting to change overseas. The fans, aided by the NFL Europe League starting up in 1991 and having a team in Germany, began to understand the game more. A sellout crowd of 67,132 showed up to see Minnesota defeat the Bills 20-6.

What actually happened on the field, though, isn’t what former Vikings players most remember about the trip. The game was played at Berlin’s Olympic Stadium, where the 1936 Olympics were held. At those Games, legendary Black athlete Jesse Owens won four gold medals in track and field and showed up Adolf Hilter and his racist beliefs of Aryanism.

“I was in awe going to the Olympic Stadium because I actually got to meet Jesse Owens when I was a kid growing in Phoenix and he came to our church once when I was about 10,” Jordan said. “I shook his hand and got his autograph on a church program, and here I am in the stadium where Hitler was and where the Olympics were and where Jesse lit it up and made such a statement to the world.”

Vikings players had a chance to tour the city. They visited remnants of the Berlin Wall, which had been torn down in 1989.

“I don’t remember anything about that football game but I remember going to see the sights,” said Sean Salisbury, a Vikings quarterback from 1990-94. “I’m a big history buff. It hadn’t been that long since the Wall had come down, and I remember seeing pieces of brick on the streets that had been broken from when the Wall came down. It was just eerie.”

The Vikings didn’t waste any time before their next trip overseas. The following year, they traveled 6,000 miles to Tokyo, which remains the farthest they ever have gone for a game.

The Vikings defeated the Chiefs 17-9 at the Tokyo Dome before a sellout crowd of 49,555. The most popular players on the trip for the Vikings were quarterback Warren Moon and wide receiver Cris Carter, both future hall of famers. They signed numerous autographs, and Japanese fans often expressed their gratitude when they got one with a bow.

“When we would go out to eat, the chefs would come out and honor us for eating their food,” McDaniel said. “They came out and bowed and asked if we enjoyed the food.”

McDaniel did. What he didn’t enjoy was trying to adjust to a time zone 14 hours ahead.

“It was brutal,” he said.

The international trips for the Vikings now are not that long, but they are held in the regular season. And that makes a big difference.

“When we went over, it was always preseason, and we stayed longer,” McDaniel said. “There was no rush to come back. But now you fly over and then you play and then you fly back, so I don’t know if I would have liked to have gone over there for a regular-season game. That would truly have thrown my routine off.”

Mindful of not wanting that to happen to players, the Vikings flew to London on Thursday night, arrived Friday morning, and will fly home immediately after the game. Executive director of health and performance Tyler Williams said the Vikings don’t want players to fully acclimate to the six-hour time difference because they then would need to fully acclimate back, a problem since they have a game Oct. 9 against Chicago at U.S. Bank Stadium. They are staying at a hotel an hour north of central London, so there hasn’t figured to be much sightseeing.

The Vikings had bye weeks following each of their two previous regular-season Sunday games in London, so they had longer trips and got some time to see the sights. In 2013, they left on Monday night and arrived Tuesday morning.

“We went and saw the Crown Jewels and stuff,” Vikings safety Harrison Smith said. “It was cool. We saw Parliament, Big Ben and all of that.”

On Sunday, Smith will become the first Vikings player to appear in three games in London. Wide receiver Adam Thielen is the only other Minnesota player remaining from the 2013 trip, but he was then a rookie on the practice squad.

Thielen shined in London in 2017, catching five passes for 98 yards and being named Man of the Match before an enthusiastic sellout crowd of 74,237. After an 18-yard touchdown reception in the second quarter from Case Keenum, he thrilled fans with a soccer slide to celebrate.

On that trip, the Vikings departed for London on Wednesday night and arrived Thursday morning. Thielen said that gave players time to check out some pubs and go to a Premier League soccer game between Arsenal and Swansea City.

Both Smith and Thielen said football fans in England were more knowledge in 2017 than in 2013, and they are expecting to see another jump in knowledge Sunday.

“They are becoming more aware of what American football is,” Thielen said. “You could tell just from the first time to the second time, just the celebrations, the cheering was more on point.”

On Sunday, one of the fans on hand will be Jordan, who said he’ll be rooting for both teams because he “can’t lose in that situation.” Since arriving in London, he already has been talking about how far the NFL has come on an international stage since he played in that 1983 game.

“I tell people I played in the first World Bowl in Europe, and I’m pretty proud of that fact,” he said. “It was great to experience that. The Vikings have been pioneers and now the Vikings are going back to Europe again. It’s exciting, and I’m certainly looking forward to the continued progression of American football in Europe.”

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