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Interim labor agreement averts threat of nationwide railroad strike – The Denver Post

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Interim Railroad Labor Deal Reached, Averting Strike – The Denver Post
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By JOSH FUNK, JOSH BOAK and ZEKE MILLER

WASHINGTON (AP) — Railroads and their workers reached a tentative agreement Thursday to avert a nationwide strike that could have shut down the nation’s freight trains and devastated the economy less than two months before the midterm elections .

President Joe Biden announced the deal, which emerged from a marathon 20-hour negotiating session at the Labor Department and came just a day before the walkout was threatened.

“This agreement is validation of what I have always believed – unions and management can work together … for the benefit of all,” Biden said at the White House Rose Garden.

The deal, which includes a 24% pay rise, will be put to a vote by union members after a several-week cooling-off period.

The threat of a shutdown carried political risks for Biden, a Democrat who believes unions have built the middle class. But he also knew that a strike by railway workers could hurt the economy before midterm, when majorities in both houses of Congress, key governorates and dozens of important state offices will be up for grabs.

Biden made a key phone call Wednesday night to Labor Secretary Marty Walsh as negotiators spoke and were offered Italian food for dinner, according to White House officials who insisted on anonymity to discuss the conversations. .

On loudspeaker, the president urged both sides to reach an agreement and consider the harm a shutdown would inflict on families, farmers and businesses, officials said.

A union had to wake up its board to push through the deal, which involved 50 calls from White House officials to union officials.

Joined in the Oval Office by business and labor leaders, a beaming Biden joked that he was surprised everyone was “still up” after the night was over and that they should be “home.” them in their bed”.

A strike would also have disrupted passenger traffic as well as freight, as Amtrak and many commuter railroads operate on tracks owned by freight railroads. Amtrak canceled all of its long-distance trains before the strike deadline and was working to restore full service.

The five-year deal, retroactive to 2020, also includes $5,000 in bonuses. The railways have agreed to relax their strict attendance policies to address union concerns over working conditions.

Railway workers will now be able to take unpaid leave for doctor’s appointments without being penalized. Previously, workers lost points under the BNSF and Union Pacific railroad attendance systems, and they could be penalized if they lost all of their points.

The talks also included Norfolk Southern, CSX, Kansas City Southern and Canadian National’s US operations.

Unions that represent conductors and engineers who run the trains have been pushing for attendance rules to be changed, and they said the deal sets a precedent that ensures they will be able to negotiate such rules at the future.

Victor Chen, a sociologist at Virginia Commonwealth University who studies labor, said concerns about working conditions have increasingly become a priority for unions and the workers they represent.

“At a certain point, good wages are no longer enough to offset the cost that these working conditions impose on workers,” Chen said. “Companies should treat workers as human beings, rather than just inputs into a business process.”

Railway unions have highlighted workload and attendance rules after major railways cut nearly a third of their workforce – some 45,000 jobs – in the past six years.

The rail industry has dramatically cut costs everywhere and refocused its operations to rely more on fewer and longer trains, which use fewer locomotives and fewer employees. Unions said the remaining workers, especially engineers and drivers, were on 24/7 duty due to job cuts and could hardly take time off under strict attendance rules .

Unions had an advantage at the bargaining table due to the tight labor market and ongoing service issues on the railroads, Chen said.

Shippers have complained loudly this year of delays and poor service as railroads struggled to quickly hire enough to cope with increased demand as the economy emerged from the pandemic. Shipping problems gave railroad workers additional leverage.

Newly hired CSX CEO Joe Hinrichs said he hopes the new deal will help the railroad hire and retain more employees to address service issues.

“Now we can move our conversation to how we work together to grow the business and better serve our customers,” he said.

Union activism has increased under Biden, as evidenced by a 56% increase in petitions for union representation to the National Labor Relations Board so far this fiscal year, including significant organizing efforts at Starbucks, Amazon and other companies. A number of unions have gone on strike over the past two years to win better terms.

Todd Vachon, a Rutgers University professor who teaches labor relations, said working conditions were increasingly a key part of labor disputes – sometimes rivaling wages and benefits. Railway workers were particularly aware of work-life balance and the possibility of being absent for health reasons.

This has led to a “genuine resurgence of the labor movement that goes beyond simply reacting to inflation,” Vachon said.

Before the deal was struck, business groups including the Business Roundtable and the American Chamber of Commerce predicted that a railroad strike would be an “economic disaster.”

The Association of American Railroads trade group estimated that a railroad strike would cost the economy more than $2 billion a day and force many companies to reduce or cease production and consider layoffs.

“We appreciate the Biden administration’s intervention on behalf of businesses and consumers who would have been impacted at a time when high inflation and economic uncertainty are challenging consumer budgets and jeopardizing business resilience. “, said Matthew Shay, managing director of National Retail. Federation.

The deal also has broad implications for congressional control and the health of the shipping network that keeps factories running, stocking store shelves and assembling the United States as an economic powerhouse.

American Trucking Associations President and CEO Chris Spear said the rail deal “allows our supply chain to continue to emerge from this COVID-induced rut.”

With the economy still recovering from the supply chain disruptions of the pandemic, the president’s goal was to get all parties talking so that a deal could be reached.

Biden also knew a shutdown could worsen the momentum that has contributed to soaring inflation and created a political headache for the ruling party.

Biden faced the same kind of predicament as Theodore Roosevelt in 1902 with coal and Harry Truman in 1952 with steel – how does a president balance the needs of labor and business while doing what is best for the nation?

The railroads were so important during World War I that Woodrow Wilson temporarily nationalized the industry to keep goods moving and prevent strikes.

So the administration jumped in the middle of talks with Biden and cabinet officials calling both sides and the Labor Secretary directly involved in the negotiations.

At 5:05 a.m. Thursday, it was clear the effort had paid off when Biden announced the deal, calling it “an important victory for our economy and the American people.”

___

Funk reported from Omaha, Nebraska.

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China seeks to ‘normalize’ military drills near island: Taiwan

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China Seeks To 'Normalize' Military Drills Near Island: Taiwan
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China says its armed forces have the right to operate around Taiwan. (Case)

Taipei:

China is seeking to “normalize” its military activities near Taiwan, including crossing the center line of the Taiwan Strait, which poses an unprecedented challenge, Taiwan’s Defense Ministry said on Tuesday.

China, which considers the democratically-ruled island its own territory, waged war games including missile fire over Taipei in early August in response to a visit to Taiwan by the US House Speaker. United, Nancy Pelosi.

China’s military activities near Taiwan have continued at a much reduced level, although Chinese military aircraft still regularly cross the middle line of the Taiwan Strait, which previously served as an unofficial barrier between the two.

“In the future, the activities of Chinese Communist military aircraft and ships entering our air defense identification zone, crossing the median line and approaching sea areas near the island will gradually become more normalized,” he said. said the ministry.

“The national army faces an unprecedented challenge,” the ministry said in a report to parliament before Defense Minister Chiu Kuo-cheng answered lawmaker questions on Wednesday, a copy of which was reviewed by Reuters. .

China says its armed forces have the right to operate around Taiwan because it is Chinese territory.

The Taiwanese government has denounced Beijing’s threats and rejected China’s sovereignty claims, saying only the island’s 23 million people have the right to decide their future.

Taiwan will respond to China’s military threats by “appropriately” increasing its level of combat readiness and remaining on high alert, the ministry said.

As the world is distracted by the war in Ukraine, China is upgrading its armed forces and increasing pressure on Taiwan, the ministry said.

In its report seeking parliamentary approval for next year’s defense budget, the ministry also said it hoped to prioritize spending on ammunition and arms parts to respond to “the state of urgent combat readiness”.

The government has proposed $19 billion in defense spending for next year, a double-digit increase from 2022 that includes funds for new fighter jets.

(Except for the title, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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Chicago Bears QB rewind: Is Luke Getsy doing enough to turn Justin Fields loose in the passing attack?

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Chicago Bears Qb Rewind: Is Luke Getsy Doing Enough To Turn Justin Fields Loose In The Passing Attack?
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Chicago Bears offensive coordinator Luke Getsy isn’t scheduled to speak with reporters until Thursday at Halas Hall.

That leaves a couple more days for Getsy’s harshest critics — and Justin Fields’ staunchest defenders — to continue catapulting tomatoes at will, firing on Getsy’s play-calling and an offensive approach that some have deemed too conservative to unlock the Bears’ bottom-tier attack.

But the knee-jerk outrage in the wake of Sunday’s 20-12 road loss to the New York Giants might not have ample supporting evidence, even after the Bears settled for four field goals in 12 possessions.

The truth is accountability must be spread all around as the Bears seek stimulants to enliven their 32nd-ranked passing offense. Fields isn’t playing well by any stretch of the imagination. His ordinary and depleted receiving corps hasn’t stepped up. The offensive line has been inconsistent at best in pass protection and now figures to be without guard Cody Whitehair for the rest of October.

And, yes, Getsy also should be held responsible for his role in overseeing an offense that has an NFL-low five touchdowns through four games and ranks 26th in third-down efficiency (34%).

A deeper dive into Sunday’s video, however, revealed an overwhelming number of execution errors that proved far more detrimental to the Bears’ stumbles than play-calling.

On 60 offensive snaps, the Bears ran 34 pass plays. Eleven resulted in completions. Eleven were incomplete. Six went down as quarterback scrambles for positive yards. Another six resulted in sacks, including a poorly blocked second-quarter play that ended with Fields losing a fumble.

Folded into the game video is evidence that the Bears had plenty of opportunities to make plays in the passing game and had shrewd calls to help that cause. They just faltered. Then they lost, touching a city’s raw nerve.

You can bet the upbeat rhetoric from inside Halas Hall won’t land quite right this week.

“I love the way (Justin) was throwing the ball down the field,” Bears coach Matt Eberflus said immediately after the game. “That’s going to open up more things for us.”

Fields did finish with season highs in completions and passing yards. It’s all relative, but statistically, that’s progress, right? Eberflus saw it as such.

Still, when an 11-completion, 174-yard performance without a touchdown pass registers as a step forward worthy of a fist pump, the problems remain sizable.

Here’s your comprehensive Week 4 QB rewind.

Defining moment

On third-and-10 from the Giants 35-yard line late in the first half, Fields missed his biggest opportunity to break his three-week slump without a touchdown pass. Getsy sent in a “four verticals” concept against a Cover-2 look, giving Fields a well-timed chance to take a shot.

“That’s a very basic play,” Eberflus said.

Yet the Bears couldn’t pull it off.

Receiver Darnell Mooney made a mental error in the huddle, confusing the call with a like-named play from Matt Nagy’s 2021 library and mixing up the details of his route. Even so, the way things developed, Fields had a grooved fastball hanging over the plate and a chance to swing for the fences like he did on the team field trip to Wrigley Field over the summer.

A bit of a coverage bust by the Giants left Mooney streaking uncovered up the seam toward the end zone. And while, by his own admission, Mooney was supposed to bend his route toward the right hash instead of running straight upfield, there’s no excuse for Fields not seeing that big play waiting or pulling the trigger to capitalize.

“He certainly had time on that,” Eberflus said. “He certainly had time and could’ve rode the pocket a little bit more.”

Against a four-man rush, the Bears protection held up. It was the cleanest pocket Fields had all day. Yet for some reason, the moment he hit the top of his five-step drop, he tucked the football, dropped his eyes and scrambled forward through the pocket.

Eberflus theorized Monday that Fields was responding to a coaching point to either look for his check-down or run on that play against that coverage. Thus he gained 12 yards to convert on third-and-long and move the Bears inside the Giants 25.

But here’s why, at this stage of Fields’ development, it’s critical to separate play results from processes and decision-making.

Fields did too much wrong during that sequence, perhaps indicating that bad habits are starting to form amid the offense’s struggles. Or at the very least, good habits haven’t solidified. For one thing, while Fields might not have seen what he expected to see, he had to recognize the big break that presented itself.

“There’s no doubt,” Eberflus said Monday. “Get your eyes downfield and see what you see and take what they give you. You certainly have to do that. For sure.”

While Mooney acknowledged running the wrong route, he was reminded that the route he did run would have gone for a touchdown had Fields shown proper recognition.

“True,” he said. “True. And then we’re not talking about this as well. But I just have to be in the right spot.”

Fields’ lack of pocket awareness combined with his eagerness to take off running proved disappointing. To top it all off, his run was far from careful as he missed an opportunity to bounce outside and get out of bounds after picking up the first down and instead ran into a significant hit from linebacker Tae Crowder.

Again, the Bears picked up a first down on the play. But they left a potential game-changing touchdown on the table.

Uh-oh

The second quarter was full of examples where the Bears had chances to produce in the passing game but failed during an ugly four-possession stretch in which the offense again made even the basics of football look difficult.

A sampling from that menu:

  • On a first-down play-action pass near midfield, Fields rolled right for a seemingly easy completion to rookie running back Trestan Ebner. Yet confronted with moderate pressure from outside linebacker Tomon Fox, Fields threw high and missed Ebner badly. Incomplete.
  • Five plays later, after converting on third-and-20 with a beautifully executed screen pass to Khalil Herbert for 24 yards, the Bears were in field-goal range with a first down at the Giants 27. Getsy sent in a pick play in which tight end Cole Kmet helped to free Equanimeous St. Brown coming across the middle, right to left, for what Fields was certain would be a big gain. But center Sam Mustipher was beaten up the middle by defensive tackle Dexter Lawrence, and left tackle Braxton Jones was beaten worse by defensive end Azeez Olujari. Ojulari’s helmet hit Fields’ right triceps as he threw, and the ball popped up for an unorthodox fumble the Giants recovered.
  • On the next possession, Fields bit off a big chunk with a play-action completion to Mooney: 21 yards up the left sideline on an out route. The pocket wasn’t entirely clean on that play, but it was more than friendly enough and Fields didn’t get enough mustard on his pass. It was about a foot and a half short and short-hopped the turf as Mooney dived to grab it. The big gain was overturned on a Giants challenge. Instead of a first down at midfield, the Bears had third-and-6 at their 29 and Fields took a 9-yard sack on the next snap when Lawrence pushed Lucas Patrick backward.
  • The Bears forced a turnover on the subsequent punt. But a second-down slant pass to Dante Pettis was knocked down when defensive lineman Nick Williams detached from Mustipher’s block to get his left hand in the passing lane. Then came the missed home run pitch with Mooney all alone deep.
  • Finally, with an aggressive attempt to squeeze points out of their final first-half possession, the Bears ran three pass plays in the final 36 seconds before halftime. But that resulted in a pair of 2-yard Fields scrambles and a half-ending sack.

And that was just a one-quarter sampling of the constant malfunctioning.

Four games into the season, Bears fans find themselves in a familiar place. Their starting quarterback is struggling. His supporting cast isn’t doing much supporting. The offensive coordinator is under fire. And the defense and special teams are making enough mistakes to get them beat.

With 13 games remaining, the debate is intensifying as to who deserves how much blame for all that’s going wrong, particularly with the passing offense.

Fields’ surface-level diagnosis?

“We’ve just got to be more consistent,” he said. “Whether it’s me, whether it’s O-line, whether it’s the receivers. On some plays we’re all on the same page and we’re all executing great. And then (on) some plays we aren’t.”

Back to the grind.

On the bright side

Fields’ deep ball to Mooney on the first play of the Bears’ second possession was a thing of a beauty, a 56-yard connection that required a strong throw on a gusty New Jersey afternoon and a pretty catch by Fields’ favorite receiver.

In all, Mooney had a season-high 94 yards and was on the receiving end of Fields’ best three throws. In addition to that first-quarter deep ball, he added a pair of 18-yard receptions.

The first, on the Bears’ second offensive snap, came on play action with Fields’ footwork and timing crisp. In the third quarter, Mooney worked out of the left slot and settled into a window in the Giants zone. Fields calmly dropped a pretty touch pass into his hands for a big gain.

The only other shot the Bears hit down the field was a play-action rollout dart to tight end Trevon Wesco for a gain of 23.

Yet Eberflus seemed almost giddy that a passing attack that averaged 78.3 net yards in September showed even the smallest signs of life.

“We got the ball down the field in the passing game,” Eberflus emphasized Monday. “So that was a good thing to see. That’s a good start for us. (There’s) some good confidence to be built from that.”

It was the latest evidence that the Bears still are making — and celebrating — baby steps in the evolution of their passing game.

Odds and ends

  • Eberflus said Sunday he would have to look at the game video to see what went wrong with the Bears’ lackluster effort in trying to recover Fields’ second-quarter fumble. By Monday afternoon, he had a full report. St. Brown, Cody Whitehair, Teven Jenkins and Larry Borom were docked for “loafs” for their lack of urgency in getting after the football. Eberflus made it clear he wouldn’t condone that kind of focus lapse. He did, though, offer some sympathy because the loose ball came from behind those players and outside their vision when it popped free. “It’s like, ‘Hey, I’m in pass pro and then all of a sudden this thing drops from the sky over my head and then it’s (right) there,’” Eberflus said. “So I think Cody was caught off guard. As all the linemen were. You’ve got to be ready for it and jump on it and have some reaction there.”
  • The Bears’ ability to convert on third-and-20 and beat a blitz with a well-timed and sharply executed screen pass to Herbert was impressive. The Giants sent a five-man rush, but the Bears were synced up nicely and, with key blocking out in front from Mustipher, Whitehair and Jenkins, Herbert took Fields’ pass 2 yards behind the line of scrimmage and rumbled 4 yards beyond the line to gain. For those who sat through four seasons of clunky screen attempts in the Nagy era, that 24-yard pickup was refreshing.
  • The Bears went 0-for-3 inside the red zone and have converted only 50% of their red-zone trips into touchdowns this season. That’s tied for 24th in the league. With nine plays inside the red zone against the Giants, the Bears called four pass plays and five runs. Ultimately they settled for three Michael Badgley field goals. Getsy is taking heat from fans for not being more aggressive and calling a higher volume of passing plays inside the red zone, particularly on third-and-3 from the Giants 5 in the first quarter. But the running game has been the Bears’ offensive strength through four games. Leaning on a strength in a scoring opportunity seemed logical, especially given the consistent execution breakdowns on passing plays.
  • On the Bears’ second red-zone trip, Fields took a sack on first down from the Giants 12 when it appeared he had Kmet open in his line of vision for what would have been a short gain to the left. Fields instead scurried into a loss and was taken down by defensive end Jihad Ward. Fields indicated after the game he had anticipated Ward would follow Kmet. Given a chance for a redo, he insinuated he would have thrown to Kmet. Mooney expanded on that sequence Monday, noting he contributed to the play’s sloppiness with a misinterpretation of his responsibilities based on the formation he heard called for in the huddle. Mooney said he was supposed to run a corner route but mistakenly stayed in to chip in pass protection based on the huddle call. That eliminated one of Fields’ primary targets. “I thought I heard something else (called) and some guys heard something else as well,” Mooney said.
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GM adds former Lyft and Tesla executive Jon McNeill to board

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Gm Adds Former Lyft And Tesla Executive Jon Mcneill To Board
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A General Motors sign is seen during an event on January 25, 2022 in Lansing, Michigan. – General Motors will create 4,000 new jobs and retain 1,000, and significantly increase manufacturing capacity for battery cells and electric trucks.

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DETROIT — General Motors announced Tuesday that it is adding Jon McNeill, a former Lyft and Tesla executive, to its board of directors.

McNeill, 55, is currently CEO of DVx Ventures, a venture capital firm he co-founded in 2020 that focuses on investing and growing start-up companies. Prior to that, he was chief operating officer at Lyft and president of global sales, delivery and service at Tesla.

GM CEO and President Mary Barra in a statement cited McNeill’s experiences as “a tremendous asset to GM as we accelerate toward an all-electric future.”

McNeill’s appointment is notable, as the Detroit automaker has set a goal to outsell Tesla in electric vehicles by the middle of the decade and then offer electric vehicles exclusively by 2035.

Jon McNeill, poses for a photo as Tesla opens a service center at Kong Nam Industrial Building, 603 – 609 Castle Peak Road, Tsuen Wan.

Felix Wang | South China Morning Message | Getty Images

“GM is rapidly evolving to meet global needs for cleaner, safer transportation and is discovering new growth opportunities with every hardware and software innovation it introduces,” McNeill said.

GM’s board, which has been hailed for its gender neutrality in recent years, now has 13 directors, including six women. Twelve of the directors are independent.

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4 things to watch for as the Chicago Bulls open preseason play tonight, including who will start at point guard

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4 Things To Watch For As The Chicago Bulls Open Preseason Play Tonight, Including Who Will Start At Point Guard
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The Chicago Bulls return to the court to gear up for the 2022-23 season with Tuesday’s preseason opener against the New Orleans Pelicans at the United Center (8:30 p.m., TNT, NBCSCH+).

Four exhibition games will offer an early glimpse at this season’s team, which features 13 returning players from last season’s roster.

Here are four key questions for the Bulls heading into preseason action.

1. Who will start at point guard?

Coach Billy Donovan said Lonzo Ball continues to progress after Wednesday’s knee procedure, his second since a meniscus injury sidelined him in January. But Ball is months away from returning to the starting lineup.

In the meantime, the Bulls need to use the preseason to solidify their point guard rotation. They could play around with different rotations — for instance, starting veteran Goran Dragić and closing with Alex Caruso to balance experience and defensive acumen.

Preseason games might not provide a completely clear answer. Dragić still is practicing under restricted minutes after participating in the Eurobasket tournament last month, which could result in a lighter preseason workload than he will play in the regular season. But Dragić said the Bulls will begin to solidify their rotations during the preseason games, which could give hints at the starting point guard.

2. How does a healthy Zach LaVine factor into the offense?

After a season marred by a knee injury, LaVine voiced eagerness about returning at full health in 2022-23.

The Bulls need more availability from their All-Star shooting guard this season after LaVine signed a maximum contract extension in the offseason. The preseason offers the first look at LaVine’s style of play after arthroscopic knee surgery over the summer.

Donovan said he will speak with veterans such as LaVine, Dragić and DeMar DeRozan to determine how many preseason minutes they need to prepare for the regular season without risking fatigue or injury. Although key starters are unlikely to play full rotations, the Bulls would benefit from giving LaVine and DeRozan ample time on the court together.

3. Has Patrick Williams upped his aggression?

Bulls teammates and coaches have been frank about needing more from the power forward in his third season. Williams also was deterred by injury last season, spending most of it on the bench healing torn ligaments in his left wrist.

Williams was notably hesitant after returning late in the season, a trait that also stuck out during his rookie season.

The Bulls have urged Williams to increase his volume of shots as well as his downhill aggression when driving to the basket. If he doesn’t display more confidence during preseason competition, the Bulls might have cause for concern as Williams continues to find his place in the rotation.

4. Is rookie Dalen Terry ready for action?

The Bulls added to their backcourt depth by using the No. 18 pick in the NBA draft on Terry, a defensive-minded guard from Arizona who still is working on his jump shot as he enters his first season.

The Bulls voiced optimism about Terry’s performance in the NBA Summer League, in which he averaged 11.8 points. But is he ready for real NBA minutes?

Donovan said the Bulls plan to bring Terry along slowly, utilizing the G League’s Windy City Bulls as a platform to build up to first-team minutes. But the Bulls said the same of Ayo Dosunmu ahead of his rookie season, which ended with the first-year guard helming the offense in Ball’s absence.

The Bulls already are operating with a diminished depth chart at guard because of Ball’s injury. Terry’s performance the next two weeks will set a gauge for his readiness to begin seeing minutes in the secondary rotation.

Bulls preseason schedule

  • Tuesday, Oct. 4: vs. New Orleans Pelicans, 8:30 p.m., United Center, TNT, NBCSCH+
  • Friday, Oct. 7: vs. Denver Nuggets, 7 p.m., United Center, NBCSCH
  • Sunday, Oct. 9: at Toronto Raptors, 5 p.m., Scotiabank Arena, NBCSCH
  • Tuesday, Oct. 11: vs. Milwaukee Bucks, 7 p.m., United Center, NBCSCH

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4 things to watch as the Chicago Bulls open preseason tonight, including who will start at point guard – The Denver Post

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4 Things To Watch As The Chicago Bulls Open Preseason Tonight, Including Who Will Start At Point Guard – The Denver Post
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The Chicago Bulls return to the field to prepare for the 2022-23 season with Tuesday’s preseason opener against the New Orleans Pelicans at the United Center (8:30 p.m., TNT, NBCSCH+).

Four exhibition games will offer a first look at this season’s squad, which includes 13 players returning from last season’s roster.

Here are four key questions for the Bulls ahead of preseason action.

1. Who will start at point guard?

Coach Billy Donovan said Lonzo Ball continues to improve after Wednesday’s knee surgery, his second since a meniscus injury sidelined him in January. But Ball is months away from returning to the starting lineup.

In the meantime, the Bulls need to use the preseason to solidify their point guard rotation. They could play with different rotations – for example, starting veteran Goran Dragić and concluding with Alex Caruso to balance experience and defensive acumen.

Pre-season games might not provide a completely clear answer. Dragić is still training under restricted minutes after taking part in the Eurobasket tournament last month, which could result in a lighter pre-season workload than he will play in the regular season. But Dragić said the Bulls will begin to solidify their rotations during preseason games, which could give clues to the starting point guard.

2. How does a healthy Zach LaVine contribute to the offense?

After a season marred by a knee injury, LaVine has expressed his desire to return to full health in 2022-23.

The Bulls need more availability from their All-Star shooting guard this season after LaVine signed a max contract extension in the offseason. The preseason offers a first look at LaVine’s style of play after arthroscopic knee surgery over the summer.

Donovan said he will speak with veterans such as LaVine, Dragić and DeMar DeRozan to determine how many preseason minutes they need to prepare for the regular season without risking fatigue or injury. While key starters are unlikely to play full rotations, the Bulls would benefit from giving LaVine and DeRozan enough time on the court together.

3. Did Patrick Williams increase his aggression?

Bulls teammates and coaches have been candid that they need more from the power forward in his third season. Williams was also deterred by injury last season, spending most of it on the bench tending to torn ligaments in his left wrist.

Williams was particularly hesitant after returning late in the season, a trait that also stood out in his rookie season.

The Bulls urged Williams to increase his shot volume as well as his downhill aggression when driving to the basket. If he doesn’t show more confidence in preseason competition, the Bulls could have cause for concern as Williams continues to find his place in the rotation.

4. Is rookie Dalen Terry ready for action?

The Bulls added to their backcourt depth by using the No. 18 NBA draft pick on Terry, an Arizona defensive mind guard who is still working on his jump shot as he starts his first season.

The Bulls expressed optimism about Terry’s performance in the NBA Summer League, in which he averaged 11.8 points. But is he ready for real NBA minutes?

Donovan said the Bulls plan to bring Terry in slowly, using the G League’s Windy City Bulls as a platform to rack up first-team minutes. But the Bulls said the same of Ayo Dosunmu ahead of his rookie season, which ended with the freshman guard leading the offense in Ball’s absence.

The Bulls are already operating with a diminished depth chart at guard due to Ball’s injury. Terry’s performance over the next two weeks will set a gauge for his readiness to start seeing minutes in the secondary rotation.

Bulls preseason schedule

  • Tuesday, October 4: vs. New Orleans Pelicans, 8:30 p.m., United Center, TNT, NBCSCH+
  • Friday, October 7: vs. Denver Nuggets, 7 p.m., United Center, NBCSCH
  • Sunday, October 9: at the Toronto Raptors, 5 p.m., Scotiabank Arena, NBCSCH
  • Tuesday, October 11: vs. Milwaukee Bucks, 7 p.m., United Center, NBCSCH

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ASK IRA: Will Tyler Herro’s extension impact future Heat spending?

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Ask Ira: Will Tyler Herro’s Extension Impact Future Heat Spending?
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Q: If Victor Oladipo gets back to the player level he was at Indiana, how would the Heat be able to keep him? – Bob, Davie.

A: I always find this interesting, that no sooner does a player on a team get a maximum contract or extension then the concern becomes about keeping it all together. First, while the NBA has a salary cap, it is not necessarily a hard cap. So if Victor Oladipo has a big season and opts out of the second year on the deal he signed this summer, the Heat retain his Bird Rights and can sign him up to the NBA maximum. Plus, keep in mind that while Tyler Herro now likely cannot be traded this season, due to the “poison pill” element created by his extension, he again can be dealt without such restriction on July 1. So, in the end, the money has a way of working itself out when it comes to preserving talent.

Q: So no Kevin Durant this year then? Hooray for Tyler, it’s a lot of money but that is or will be (next year) the going rate at least for someone at his level, so as usual Andy Elisburg is looking ahead of the curve. Since KD seems to be staying put, is this also the long game for Pat Riley (wouldn’t be the first time he’s had a long-term plan for a major player)? In 12 months’ time, Tyler’s $30 million a year and Duncan Robinson’s $17 million would equal a whale like Durant. And if the Nets have another disappointing year then maybe they might be more inclined to trade their star in 2023. So is this a win-win? Tyler’s locked up, hopefully set to keep upping his game, and if not, then he could play an important part in a fishing expedition.– Phillip, San Francisco.

A: So you’re saying the Heat are playing chess instead of checkers? And you might be right, the contracts of Tyler Herro and Duncan Robinson next summer would have the Heat in that sweet spot of a package equaling a max salary on the trade market. But sometimes you also can be burdened by such deals. I’ll believe Duncan’s deal can be dealt when I see it. And if Tyler cannot upgrade his defense, or is unable to crack the starting lineup, then his deal might also come to be viewed as overvalued. In other words, we’re just getting started on this process.

Q: Ira, looks like the Heat are looking at a much smaller deadline day, and are going to rely on the buyout market, at best. – Gabriel, Miami.

A: Which tends to be the case when you don’t have many trade assets to put into play. Then again, the Heat turned Kelly Olynyk and Avery Bradley into Victor Oladipo, so you never know.

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