Connect with us

News

Putin tells Modi he will ‘stop’ Ukraine invasion he ordered ‘as soon as possible’ after Indian leader slams Russia’s war opposite

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Putin Tells Modi He Will 'Stop' Ukraine Invasion He Ordered 'As Soon As Possible' After Indian Leader Slams Russia'S War Opposite
google news

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi attend a meeting on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization summit in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, September 16, 2022.Sergei Bobylev/Reuters

  • Modi explicitly criticized Russia’s war in Ukraine during his meeting with Putin on Friday.

  • “Today’s era is not an era of war, and I told you about it on the phone,” Modi said.

  • “I know your concerns. We want this all to end as soon as possible,” Putin told Modi.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi criticized Russia’s war in Ukraine on Friday during a face-to-face meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin while the two were in Uzbekistan for the Shanghai Cooperation Organization summit.

“I know that today’s era is not an era of war, and I told you about it on the phone,” Modi told Putin, according to Reuters.

Putin told the Indian leader: “I know your position on the conflict in Ukraine, and I know your concerns. We want this all to end as soon as possible.”

The Russian president’s remarks to his Indian counterpart echoed comments about Russia’s unprovoked war in Ukraine he had made to Chinese leader Xi Jinping the day before. “We highly appreciate the balanced position of our Chinese friends regarding the Ukrainian crisis,” Putin told Xi at the summit in Uzbekistan.

“We understand your questions and concerns in this regard,” Putin added. “During today’s meeting, of course, we will explain in detail our position on this issue, although we have already spoken about it before.”

China and India have close ties with Moscow – and have continued to buy its oil, gas and coal as Western countries moved to cut purchases – but foreign policy experts and Russia watchers claim that the war in Ukraine seems to cause a major discrepancy in reports.

“Having been beaten on the battlefield, Putin is also getting beaten up at the conference table. It doesn’t take much foresight to see that Xi, Modi and others are deeply annoyed by Russia’s war fallout in Ukraine Staggering Erosion of Russia—and Putin—Diplomatic Stance,” Hal Brands, Professor of Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, said in a tweet.

“Nobody likes losers, and now they’re losing in Ukraine,” Michael McFaul, the former US ambassador to Russia, said during an appearance on MSNBC on Thursday.

Putin’s phrase, “as soon as possible,” might just be rhetoric to appease a trading partner. Putin has tried to justify the invasion as a war of necessity and alluded to it as a conquest of territory that is rightfully Russian amid intermittent attempts at diplomatic resolution that Western diplomats have dismissed as window dressing. Inside Russia, authorities are tackling those who protest or even describe the effort as a war — Putin has made it illegal to spread “fake news” about the military — despite the number of casualties the U.S. estimated at 80,000 troops.

Russia has suffered devastating troop losses in Ukraine, and its forces have recently been forced into retreat following a blistering Ukrainian counter-offensive in the east of the country, and as a wider effort to retake the territory in the south is gaining momentum. Meanwhile, Russia has been widely accused of war crimes, as it faces crippling economic sanctions during the war. The war caused an energy crisis and contributed to rising inflation around the world.

“I think what you’re hearing from China, from India, reflects concerns around the world about the effects of Russia’s aggression on Ukraine, not just the Ukrainian people,” the official said on Friday. US Secretary of State Antony Blinken to reporters. by Al Jazeera, adding: “I think this increases the pressure on Russia to end the aggression.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

yahoo

google news
Advertisement

News

Vikings’ Kwesi Adofo-Mensah vs. Bears’ Ryan Poles: The divergent paths of two new GMs

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Vikings’ Kwesi Adofo-Mensah Vs. Bears’ Ryan Poles: The Divergent Paths Of Two New Gms
google news

For better or worse, for the rest of their NFL careers, general managers Kwesi Adofo-Mensah and Ryan Poles are going to be attached at the hip.

After making a name for themselves in NFL front offices over the past decade, both emerged as prime candidates last offseason. Ultimately, the Bears hired Poles on Jan. 25, and the Vikings chose Adofo-Mensah the very next day.

The similarities stop there. Over the past 10 months, Adofo-Mensah and Poles have taken completely different approaches to building their teams, the Vikings opting to stay competitive in their pursuit of a Super Bowl, and the Bears opting for what sure looks like a complete rebuild.

With kickoff set for noon Sunday at U.S. Bank Stadium, the Vikings (3-1) have more to lose than the Bears (2-2) this week. Let’s take a look at how each team got to this point.

WHAT THE VIKINGS DID

The fact that the Vikings are off to their best start since 2016 probably shouldn’t come as a surprise. Remember, co-owner Mark Wilf made it clear last offseason that he expects the team to be “super competitive” in 2022.

That was part of the job description when the Vikings started their search to find a new general manager.

Look at the moves Adofo-Mensah made after he got the job. He hired head coach Kevin O’Connell on Feb. 16, bringing on “a partner” that shared his vision for the franchise. With his head coach in place, Adofo-Mensah got to work on the roster itself, extending quarterback Kirk Cousins, then signing edge rusher Za’Darius Smith, defensive tackle Harrison Phillips, and linebacker Jordan Hicks in free agency.

“It didn’t matter who the Vikings hired as their general manager because this was going to be the plan no matter who they brought in,” said Marc Ross, an analyst at NFL Network, who previously served in the front offices of the Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants. “The ownership wanted to be competitive, and with Kirk Cousins in place, whoever got the job had to have a plan of how they were going to succeed with him.”

That’s exactly what Adofo-Mensah has managed to do so far. All of his decisions have been designed to help the Vikings contend right now, and a month into this season, the team is 3-1 and looking like it might actually have a chance with most of the NFC struggling so far. Of course, a soft opening schedule has helped, too. Games get tougher later in the season.

“I’m going to give Kwesi a ton of credit here because I don’t think I fully grasped how flat the league was going to be,” said Eric Eager, vice president of research and development at SumerSports, who previously worked in the same role at Pro Football Focus. “I think Kwesi did a good job of examining the league and saying, ‘OK, I could tear this thing down, or I could generate some good will by winning some games in Year 1.’ There were a lot of people, myself included, who thought they should’ve torn it down.”

No doubt the most polarizing decision Adofo-Mensah made last offseason was extending Cousins’ contract. He moved forward with the status quo, choosing not to trade for a quarterback or go for a project player in the 2022 NFL Draft.

That looks like another solid decision by Adofo-Mensah. Look at some of the quarterbacks who changed teams this season. Even those that aren’t fond of Cousins would agree he’s a much better option than Matt Ryan, Carson Wentz or Baker Mayfield, among others.

“It wasn’t the best year by all accounts to find a long-term quarterback,” said Dan Graziano, an NFL Insider at ESPN. “There were a lot of imperfect options on the open market, and the Vikings had someone in place that they knew was capable. Plus, Kevin O’Connell had a prior relationship with him. I think they decided to delay the long-term quarterback conversation and decided to go with a pretty good team and see what they could do with it.”

As the Vikings continue to bank wins, it’s also important to remember that Adofo-Mensah is a trailblazer in the industry as the only general manager in the NFL with an analytics background. That fact is not insignificant.

“The moment he doesn’t have success, people are going to be like, ‘See. It didn’t work. We should’ve got some footbally football guy in here,’ ” Eager said. “For him to build some good will in Year 1, whether it’s real or not, I can’t blame him one bit. He bet that the league was going to be bad and felt like they could at least be decent with a bad schedule. He’s absolutely hit on that.”

WHAT THE BEARS DID

After interviewing with the Vikings, and establishing himself as a finalist, Poles ultimately picked the Bears as his preferred landing spot.

“It does appear that Ryan Poles preferred a job where he could blank canvas the whole thing,” Eager said. “He is building that roster completely in his own image.”

Not long after being hired, Poles made a splash, trading star edge rusher Khalil Mack to the Los Angeles Chargers in exchange for a haul of draft picks. He followed that up by letting receiver Allen Robinson and defensive tackle Akiem Hicks walk in free agency.

It’s worth noting that Poles didn’t exactly step into the best situation. Not only did the previous regime trade the farm to acquire quarterback Justin Fields in the 2021 draft, they doled out a number of hefty contract that left the Bears with virtually no cap space last offseason.

“I’s almost like, ‘What’s another rebuild?’ ” Eager said. “The roster was always going to be pretty bad. It made sense for Ryan Poles to break it down and build it up because if they stink this year no one is firing him.”

Though the Bears have overachieved to this point, and head coach Matt Eberflus has them flying around on defense, the offense has been abysmal to this point. It’s left many to wonder if Fields is the answer at quarterback. The counterpoint is that the Bears haven’t exactly put him in a position to succeed.

“It definitely feels like they’re rebuilding and trying to figure out which areas to invest in,” said Cynthia Frelund, analytics expert at NFL Network. “They started in a space that was very difficult and now they are slowly digging out of that.”

FUTURE OF THE FRANCHISES

The divergent paths of the Vikings and the Bears over the past 10 months raises the question: Which franchise will have more success in the future?

There’s no doubt the Vikings were in a much better position than the Bears for immediate success. They had more talent in place, equipped with a number of weapons on offense, starting with running back Dalvin Cook, star receiver Justin Justin, and veteran receiver Adam Thielen. They also had some playmakers in place on defense in the form edge rusher Danielle Hunter, linebacker Eric Kendricks and safety Harrison Smith, among others.

On the flip side, the Bears have way more wiggle room than the Vikings down the the road. They are projected to have a whopping $115 million in cap space next offseason. That should give Poles the ability to put his stamp on the franchise.

“In some ways, it’s going to be more difficult for the Vikings to build a Super Bowl roster, than it will be for the Bears,” Eager said. “In the NFL, there’s a much easier path building from nothing than building from average, so it’ll be interesting to see a few years from now where the rosters are for both teams.”

It’s most likely going to come down to which quarterback Adofo-Mensah and Poles choose to ride moving forward.

Maybe the Vikings stick with Cousins. Maybe the Bears stick with Fields. Maybe a couple of years from now both teams have decided to move on.

“We can compare these guys as much as we want,” Frelund said. “The reality is neither guy has picked a quarterback. That will be the real test. Eventually both guys will have to make that decision, and they will ultimately be judged by that.”

google news
Continue Reading

News

Final designs revealed for proposed Mississippi Learning Center at St. Paul’s Crosby Farm Park

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Architectural Rendering Of The Proposed Mississippi River Learning Center To Be Built Near Crosby Farm Regional Park In St. Paul.
google news

To unveil the final designs for the Mississippi Learning Center planned for St. Paul’s Crosby Farm Park, the city of St. Paul and the Great River Passage Conservancy hosted a celebratory event this week at Watergate Marina.

Undated architectural rendering, circa October 2022, of the proposed Mississippi River Learning Center to be built near Crosby Farm Regional Park in St. Paul.  (Courtesy of W Architecture)

The goal of the project is to make the Mississippi River more accessible to visitors, providing the space to wade in the water, launch a boat, and from above, hike an elevated walkway that provides a variety of viewpoints of the waterway.

With the vision for the area complete, organizers plan to spend the next six months diving deeper into the details, such as establishing roles, developing ideas for community programming and requesting the funding from the state Legislature necessary to make it all happen.

“It really does get at being able to touch the water, creating a very, very safe space for people to adults and children who like to paddle in the summertime and to walk across in the wintertime,” said Mary deLaittre, executive director of the Great River Passage Conservancy. “Experiencing nature is very important for us.”

Architectural Rendering Of The Proposed Mississippi River Learning Center To Be Built Near Crosby Farm Regional Park In St. Paul.
Undated architectural rendering, circa October 2022, of the proposed Mississippi River Learning Center to be built near Crosby Farm Regional Park in St. Paul. (Courtesy of W Architecture)

The River Learning Center would be owned by the city, with the various tenants leasing space and covering operational expenses.

The overall project, whose cost hasn’t been finalized, is to be funded with public and private resources. The city unsuccessfully sought $20 million in state bonding money during the 2022 legislative session.

Along with the River Learning Center project, the Great River Passage Conservancy is planning for two more major projects along the St. Paul riverfront.

There are proposals for a quarter-mile promenade along the downtown bluffs called the River Balcony and a design to connect the East Side River District, including Pig’s Eye Lake, with the rest of the city.

Architectural Rendering Of The Proposed Mississippi River Learning Center To Be Built Near Crosby Farm Regional Park In St. Paul.
Undated architectural rendering, circa October 2022, of the proposed Mississippi River Learning Center to be built near Crosby Farm Regional Park in St. Paul.  (Courtesy of W Architecture)
google news
Continue Reading

News

Bears at Vikings picks: Expect an ugly game … and a Vikings victory

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Bears At Vikings Picks: Expect An Ugly Game … And A Vikings Victory
google news

Pioneer Press reporters who cover the Vikings forecast Sunday’s game against the Chicago Bears at U.S. Bank Stadium:

DANE MIZUTANI

Vikings 17, Bears 10: It won’t be pretty, but the Vikings are better than the Bears and they will prove it on Sunday.

JOHN SHIPLEY

Vikings 22, Bears 16: The Vikings are developing a knack for beating second-division NFL teams. Here’s another pelt for their belts.

CHRIS TOMASSON

Vikings 23, Bears 20: Once again, it might not be pretty for the Vikings against an outmanned foe. But they will manage to move to 3-0 in the NFC North for the first time since 2015. And they won the division that year

CHARLEY WALTERS

Vikings 24, Bears 10: Minnesota’s Dalvin Cook and Alexander Mattison could total 150 yards rushing against the NFL’s worst run defense.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Bears hope to continue U.S. Bank Stadium mastery of Vikings on Sunday

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Bears Hope To Continue U.s. Bank Stadium Mastery Of Vikings On Sunday
google news

BEARS (2-2) AT VIKINGS (3-1)

Kickoff: Noon Sunday

Where: U.S. Bank Stadium

TV: KMSP-Channel 9; Adam Amin, Mark Schlereth, Kristina Pink

Radio: KFXN-FM 100.3; Paul Allen, Pete Bercich, Ben Leber

Referee: Shawn Hochuli

Series: Vikings lead 62-57-2

Line: Vikings by 7 1/2

The Vikings will go for their third straight win and try to raise their record to 3-0 against NFC North opponents. Minnesota, which already defeated Green Bay and Detroit at home, has all its home division games early in the season and all its road games late.

The Bears have managed a 2-2 record despite being outscored by 13 points overall and having continued struggles on both offense and defense. On offense, quarterback Justin Fields has been effective at times using his legs but has thrown for just 471 yards. On defense, the Bears are giving up an average of 183.3 yards rushing per game.

The Vikings will try to take advantage of Chicago’s shaky run defense with Dalvin Cook, who carried 20 times for 76 yards in last Sunday’s 28-25 win over New Orleans in London after coming back from a shoulder injury suffered in the win over the Lions the week before. But the Vikings also have plenty of weapons through the air, with Kirk Cousins throwing for 273 yards against the Saints and Justin Jefferson making 10 catches for 147 yards.

The Bears have won three of the past four games over the Vikings at U.S. Bank Stadium. December home losses to Chicago in 2018 and 2020 were very damaging, and ended up keeping the Vikings out of the playoffs.

google news
Continue Reading

News

How will OPEC+ cuts affect gas prices, inflation?

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

How Will Opec+ Cuts Affect Gas Prices, Inflation?
google news

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Major oil-producing countries led by Saudi Arabia and Russia have decided to slash the amount of oil they deliver to the global economy.

And the law of supply and demand suggests that can only mean one thing: higher prices are on the way for crude, and for the diesel fuel, gasoline and heating oil that are produced from oil.

The decision by the OPEC+ alliance to cut 2 million barrels a day starting next month comes as the Western allies are trying to cap the oil money flowing into Moscow’s war chest after it invaded Ukraine.

Here is what to know about the OPEC+ decision and what it could mean for the economy and the oil price cap:

WHY IS OPEC+ CUTTING PRODUCTION?

Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Abdulaziz bin Salman says that the alliance is being proactive in adjusting supply ahead of a possible downturn in demand because a slowing global economy needs less fuel for travel and industry.

“We are going through a period of diverse uncertainties which could come our way, it’s a brewing cloud,” he said, and OPEC+ sought to remain “ahead of the curve.” He described the group’s role as “a moderating force, to bring about stability.”

Oil prices had fallen after a summer of highs. Now, after the OPEC+ decision, they are heading for their biggest weekly gain since March. Benchmark U.S. crude rose 3.2% on Friday, to $91.31 per barrel. Brent crude, the international standard, rose 2.8% to $97.09, though it’s still down 20% from mid-June, when it traded at over $123 per barrel.

One big reason for the slide is fears that large parts of the global economy are slipping into recession as high energy prices — for oil, natural gas and electricity — drive inflation and rob consumers of spending power.

Another reason: The summer highs came about because of fears that much of Russia’s oil production would be lost to the market over the war in Ukraine.

As Western traders shunned Russian oil even without sanctions, customers in India and China bought those barrels at a steep discount, so the hit to supply wasn’t as bad as expected.

Oil producers are wary of a sudden collapse in prices if the global economy goes downhill faster than expected. That’s what happened during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 and during the global financial crisis in 2008-2009.

HOW IS THE WEST TARGETING RUSSIAN OIL?

The U.S. and Britain imposed bans that were mostly symbolic because neither country imported much Russia oil. The White House held off pressing the European Union for an import ban because EU countries got a quarter of their oil from Russia.

In the end, the 27-nation bloc decided to cut off Russian oil that comes by ship on Dec. 5, while keeping a small amount of pipeline supplies that some Eastern European countries rely on.

Beyond that, the U.S. and other Group of Seven major democracies are working out the details on a price cap on Russian oil. It would target insurers and other service providers that facilitate oil shipments from Russia to other countries. The EU approved a measure along those lines this week.

Many of those providers are based in Europe and would be barred from dealing with Russian oil if the price is above the cap.

HOW WILL OIL CUTS, PRICE CAPS AND EMBARGOES CLASH?

The idea behind the price cap is to keep Russian oil flowing to the global market, just at lower prices. Russia, however, has threatened to simply stop deliveries to a country or companies that observe the cap. That could take more Russian oil off the market and push prices higher.

That could push costs at the pump higher, too.

U.S. gasoline prices that soared to record highs of $5.02 a gallon in mid-June had been falling recently, but they have been on the rise again, posing political problems for President Joe Biden a month before midterm elections.

Biden, facing inflation at near 40-year highs, had touted the falling pump prices. Over the past week, the national average price for a gallon rose 9 cents, to $3.87. That’s 65 cents more than Americans were paying a year ago.

“It’s a disappointment, and we’re looking at what alternatives we may have,” he told reporters about the OPEC+ decision.

WILL THE OPEC PRODUCTION CUT MAKE INFLATION WORSE?

Likely yes. Brent crude should reach $100 per barrel by December, says Jorge Leon, senior vice president at Rystad Energy. That is up from an earlier prediction of $89.

Part of the 2 million-barrel-per-day cut is only on paper as some OPEC+ countries aren’t able to produce their quota. So the group can deliver only about 1.2 million barrels a day in actual cuts.

That’s still going to have a “significant” effect on prices, Leon said.

“Higher oil prices will inevitably add to the inflation headache that global central banks are fighting, and higher oil prices will factor into the calculus of further increasing interest rates to cool down the economy,” he wrote in a note.

That would exacerbate an energy crisis in Europe largely tied to Russian cutbacks of natural gas supplies used for heating, electricity and in factories and would send gasoline prices up worldwide. As that fuels inflation, people have less money to spend on other things like food and rent.

Other factors also could affect oil prices, including the depth of any possible recession in the U.S. or Europe and the duration of China’s COVID-19 restrictions, which have sapped demand for fuel.

WHAT WILL THIS MEAN FOR RUSSIA?

Analysts say that Russia, the biggest producer among the non-OPEC members in the alliance, would benefit from higher oil prices ahead of a price cap. If Russia has to sell oil at a discount, at least the reduction starts at a higher price level.

High oil prices earlier this year offset much of Russia’s sales lost from Western buyers avoiding its supply. The country also has managed to reroute some two-thirds of its typical Western sales to customers in places like India.

But then Moscow saw its take from oil slip from $21 billion in June to $19 billion in July to $17.7 billion in August as prices and sales volumes fell, according to the International Energy Agency. A third of Russia’s state budget comes from oil and gas revenue, so the price caps would further erode a key source of revenue.

Meanwhile, the rest of Russia’s economy is shrinking due to sanctions and the withdrawal of foreign businesses and investors.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Another month of solid US hiring suggests more big Fed hikes

Avatar Of Rajesh Khanna

Published

on

Another Month Of Solid Us Hiring Suggests More Big Fed Hikes
google news

By PAUL WISEMAN

WASHINGTON (AP) — America’s employers slowed their hiring in September but still added 263,000 jobs, a solid figure that will likely keep the Federal Reserve on pace to keep raising interest rates aggressively to fight persistently high inflation.

Friday’s government report showed that hiring fell from 315,000 in August to the weakest monthly gain since April 2021. The unemployment rate fell from 3.7% to 3.5%, matching a half-century low.

The Fed is hoping that slower job growth would mean less pressure on employers to raise pay and pass those costs on to their customers through price increases — a recipe for high inflation. But September’s pace of hiring was likely too robust to satisfy the central bank’s inflation fighters.

In September, hourly wages rose 5% from a year earlier, the slowest year-over-year pace since December but still hotter than the Fed would want. The proportion of Americans who either have a job or are looking for one slipped slightly, a disappointment for those hoping that more people would enter the labor force and help ease worker shortages and upward pressure on wages.

The jobs report “was still likely too strong to allow (Fed) policymakers much breathing room,” said Matt Peron, director of research at Janus Henderson Investors.

Likewise, Rubeela Farooqi, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics, said she didn’t expect September’s softer jobs and wage numbers to stop the Fed from raising its benchmark short-term rate in November by an unusually large three-quarters of a point for a fourth consecutive time — and by an additional half-point in December.

Last month, restaurants and bars added 60,000 jobs, as did healthcare companies. State and local governments cut 27,000 jobs. Retailers, transportation and warehouse companies reduced employment modestly.

The public anxiety that has arisen over high prices and the prospect of a recession is carrying political consequences as President Joe Biden’s Democratic Party struggles to maintain control of Congress in November’s midterm elections.

In its epic battle to rein in inflation, the Fed has raised its benchmark interest rate five times this year. It is aiming to slow economic growth enough to reduce annual price increases back toward its 2% target.

It has a long way to go. In August, one key measure of year-over-year inflation, the consumer price index, amounted to 8.3%. And for now, consumer spending — the primary driver of the U.S. economy — is showing resilience. In August, consumers spent a bit more than in July, a sign that the economy was holding up despite rising borrowing rates, violent swings in the stock market and inflated prices for food, rent and other essentials.

Fed Chair Jerome Powell has warned bluntly that the inflation fight will “bring some pain,” notably in the form of layoffs and higher unemployment. Some economists remain hopeful that despite the persistent inflation pressures, the Fed will still manage to achieve a so-called soft landing: Slowing growth enough to tame inflation, without going so far as to tip the economy into recession.

It’s a notoriously difficult task. And the Fed is trying to accomplish it at a perilous time. The global economy, weakened by food shortages and surging energy prices resulting from Russia’s war against Ukraine, may be on the brink of recession. Kristalina Georgieva, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, warned Thursday that the IMF is downgrading its estimates for world economic growth by $4 trillion through 2026 and that “things are more likely to get worse before it gets better.’’

Powell and his colleagues on the Fed’s policymaking committee want to see signs that the abundance of available jobs — there’s currently an average of 1.7 openings for every unemployed American — will steadily decline. Some encouraging news came this week, when the Labor Department reported that job openings fell by 1.1 million in August to 10.1 million, the fewest since June 2021.

On the other hand, by any standard of history, openings remain extraordinarily high: In records dating to 2000, they had never topped 10 million in a month until last year.

Friday’s report underscored how resilient the job market remains.

“The U.S. labor market continues to decelerate, but there are no signs that it’s stalling out,’’ said Nick Bunker, head of economic research at the Indeed Hiring Lab. “Payroll growth is no longer at the jet speed we saw last year, but employment is still growing quickly.”

google news
Continue Reading

Trending