Fungi in carpets attract city of Milwaukee violations

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Fungi in carpets attract city of Milwaukee violations
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The City of Milwaukee is taking action after a 12 News investigation into fungi growing in the carpet of a Milwaukee apartment. The fungus grew for months with no response from the landlord, until the tenant contacted WISN 12 News. “She kept saying, ‘Mom, my socks are wet,’” tenant Ranisha Jackson said Tuesday, telling WISN 12 News that she discovered the problem this fall when her young daughter was playing behind the couch. “I’m like ‘why are your socks wet?’ And I went back there and there was a fungus.” There was a humidity problem, so serious fungus is growing in the living room carpet. After trying for weeks to get help from her landlord at the Lindsay Commons Apartments, she contacted WISN 12 News. The morning after the story aired, the city of Milwaukee building inspector had come out to take a look. The inspector also saw the mushrooms growing in the basement ceiling, telling Jackson’s mother that the water appeared to be coming from the next door. “So if there’s a leak on the neighbor’s property that’s causing the growth. We would fix that and have that whole area replaced,” said the inspector who asked not to be named. He confirmed what WISN 12 News discovered on Tuesday, that the neighbor’s bathtub was broken and there was a water leak under the wall. This tenant also said the landlord ignored several repair requests. The building inspector informed management of numerous violations observed in the two units. Management would only tell WISN 12 News that they were “resolving the situation.” Lindsay Commons is owned by Stonebridge Global Partners, based in Beverly Hills, California. WISN 12 News discovered that the company also owns the Windsor Court Apartments at 18th and Highland. According to their website, Stonebridge “aspires to provide quality affordable housing to enhance the lives and well-being of our residents.” When WISN 12 News called to comment on the mushroom situation, the CEO told us that we had the wrong number and hung up. Ranisha, meanwhile, is just happy that something is finally being done, even though it’s too late for her to want to stay. “Yes, I’m happy with the role of the building inspector,” Jackson said. She said she would stay with relatives until she figured out where to go next. “I’m going to pray about it. God is going to lead me in the right direction,” she said. Milwaukee residents experiencing safety issues in their rentals can call the Milwaukee Neighborhood Services Department at 414-286-2268 or file complaints at

The City of Milwaukee is taking action after a 12 News investigation into fungi growing in the carpet of a Milwaukee apartment.

The fungus grew for months with no response from the landlord, until the tenant contacted WISN 12 News.

“She kept saying, ‘Mom, my socks are wet,’” tenant Ranisha Jackson said Tuesday, telling WISN 12 News that she discovered the problem this fall when her young daughter was playing behind the couch. “I’m like ‘why are your socks wet?’ And I went back there and there was a mushroom.”

There was a humidity problem, so serious fungus was growing in the living room carpet. After trying for weeks to get help from her landlord at the Lindsay Commons Apartments, she contacted WISN 12 News.

The morning after the story aired, the city of Milwaukee building inspector had come out to take a look. The inspector also saw the mushrooms growing in the basement ceiling, telling Jackson’s mother that the water appeared to be coming from the next door.

“So if there’s a leak on the neighbor’s property that’s causing the growth. We would fix that and have that whole area replaced,” said the inspector who asked not to be named.

He confirmed what WISN 12 News discovered on Tuesday, that the neighbor’s bathtub was broken and there was a water leak under the wall. This tenant also said the landlord ignored several repair requests.

The building inspector informed management of numerous violations observed in the two units. Management would only tell WISN 12 News that they are “resolving the situation.”

The inspector said there will be a re-inspection scheduled, and if corrections are not made, owners will face fines until they are.

Lindsay Commons is owned by Stonebridge Global Partners, based in Beverly Hills, California.

WISN 12 News discovered that the company also owns the Windsor Court apartments at 18th and Highland.

According to their website, Stonebridge “aspires to provide quality affordable housing to enhance the lives and well-being of our residents”.

When WISN 12 News called to comment on the mushroom situation, the CEO told us we had the wrong number and hung up.

Ranisha, meanwhile, is just happy that something is finally being done, even though it’s too late for her to want to stay.

“Yes, I’m happy with the role of the building inspector,” Jackson said.

She said she would stay with relatives until she figured out where to go next.

“I’m going to pray about it. God is going to lead me in the right direction,” she said.

Milwaukee residents experiencing safety issues in their rentals can call the Milwaukee Neighborhood Services Department at 414-286-2268 or file complaints at

Cnn

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