Hopkins researchers are working on a blood test to detect cancer

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Hopkins researchers are working on a blood test to detect cancer
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Johns Hopkins University researchers are working to make cancer detection as simple as drawing blood. Hopkins scientists have developed a blood test called DELFI, which stands for Fragment DNA Evaluation for Early Interception. It detects DNA from cancer cells floating around in the blood. Victor Velculescu and his team at Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed breakthrough technology. “It’s almost like space-age technology,” Velculescu said. to detect 88% of cases of liver cancer – even in its early stages – with a simple blood test. “It’s an approach that looks into the blood and detects bits of DNA that come from cancer,” Velculescu said. , one of the study’s authors, said it was not just about extracting DNA. “Once it’s sequenced, that’s where the magic happens,” Foda said. “This is one of the data streams that we’ve created from the sequencing data. “Ultimately, all the data is translated using the technology.” to do this, and this is at a time when we can bring these technologies together in the lab with artificial intelligence to develop something that has never been done before,” Velculescu said. Early detection of liver cancer is essential to save lives. Liver cancer is the third leading cause of death worldwide with 800,000 people dying from it every year. “Very quickly this disease becomes metastatic and very difficult to treat,” Velculescu said. ne of the advantages of the approach we have developed is that it is very cost effective and inexpensive. We believe this means that ultimately it will be able to reach everyone in society, and even benefit those around the world.” “I think it is very important that we now have another tool at our cancer detection arsenal for patients with liver disease who are at risk for these liver cancers. Less than 20% of them get the proper screening — that’s because of the cost of ultrasound as well as accessibility,” Foda said. Hopkins researchers used the same type of technology to detect lung cancer in a study last year, and they hope DELFI will be the wave of the future for all types of cancers.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University are working to make detecting cancer as easy as drawing blood.

Hopkins scientists have developed a blood test called DELFI, which stands for Fragment DNA Evaluation for Early Interception. It detects DNA from cancer cells floating around in the blood.

Dr. Victor Velculescu and his team at Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center developed this breakthrough technology.

“It’s almost like space-age technology,” Velculescu said.

In a study of 724 people at high risk for liver cancer, researchers were able to detect 88% of cases of liver cancer – even in its early stages – with a simple blood test.

“It’s an approach that looks in the blood and detects bits of DNA from the cancer,” Velculescu said.

Zachariah Foda, one of the study’s authors, said it was not just about extracting DNA.

“Once it’s sequenced, that’s where the magic happens,” Foda said. “This is one of the data streams that we created from the sequencing data.”

Ultimately, all data is translated using technology.

“We’re very excited to do this, and it’s at a time when we can combine these technologies in the lab with artificial intelligence to develop something that’s never been done before,” Velculescu said. .

Early detection of liver cancer is key to saving lives. Liver cancer is the third leading cause of death worldwide with 800,000 people dying from it each year.

“Very quickly this disease becomes metastatic and very difficult to treat,” Velculescu said. “One of the benefits of the approach we have developed is that it is very cost effective and inexpensive. We believe this means that ultimately it can be disseminated to all members of society, and even benefit those around the world.”

“I think it’s very important that we now have another tool in our cancer detection arsenal for patients with liver disease who are at risk for these liver cancers. Less than 20% of they get the proper screening – it’s because of the cost of the ultrasound as well as the accessibility,” Foda said.

Hopkins researchers used the same kind of technology to detect lung cancer in a study last year, and they hope DELFI will be the wave of the future for all kinds of cancers.

Cnn

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